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  1. A friend and I did a four day traverse of Baranof Island last August--starting just south of Sitka at the Medvejie Fish Hatchery dock, and finishing the route on the east side of the island at Warm Springs four days later where we were picked up by float plane. Plenty of Brown Bears, bushwhacking, meadows, glaciers & icefields, alpine lakes, and spectacular ridge-walking. Pure joy.
    6 points
  2. “The horse is made ready for the day of battle, but victory rests with the Lord.” Proverbs‬ ‭21‬:‭31‬ After packing gear on Sunday and making final preparations, Ian and I left my house Monday afternoon 5/20 and drove over to Seattle for our flight to Juneau. We hired an Uber from the Juneau airport to the ferry terminal, and took the midnight boat arriving to Haines at 4:30am. From there, we caught a taxi to the Haines airport and organized/packed gear. The famous “Fly Drake” arrived around 7am and we took off around 8am with “Bad to The Bone” playing over the headsets. I had been coordinating with Drake for several months, and have found him to be very experienced, and a well-known figure in the climbing community. I tried to eek out what advice I could regarding weather, gear, and strategies without coming across as a completely inexperienced noob. At one point I suggested going fast-and-light up the Carpe Ridge and down the other side to Grand Plateau Glacier, which Drake seemed to think was a reasonable idea although he did not know of anyone who had done it before. At the time I liked this approach. It has two huge advantages: much shorter non-technical descent, and potential better conditions for Drake to pick us up. Its disadvantages included not being able to set up a base camp with extra fuel, or any sort of luxury items. Even the bare essentials for a climb of this magnitude added up to 55lb packs each, and we are always trying to improve on that number. No base camp means less supplies, and less supplies puts Drake in a tough situation. I have heard several stories of Drake taking a risk to pick up climbers who are out of fuel, food, or just scared in a difficult situation (often due to their own unpreparedness) even though he shouldn’t be obligated to. The guy certainly takes a lot of personal responsibility for the people he flies into the range, and I’m sure that is mentally taxing considering the inexperience and risk involved with some of his client’s activities. I did not want to be one of those clients, and we took in enough food for 5+ fat days. That might seem on the very slim side, but I am very confident in Ian and I’s ability to climb fast when we need to, and also stretch food out if needed. On Tuesday 5/21, weather was perfect for the glacier flight. That is a rarity in the Fairweather range. I had booked everything months in advance, but kept the door open to change flights at the last second if needed to take advantage of changing weather windows. Luckily, things worked out on the exact days we had planned them. The flight to Fairweather Glacier was spectacular. The surrounding peaks are huge, due to the fact that they rise from a very low base elevation. Our views from the air revealed the Carpe to be in excellent climbing condition. Mostly snow travel with a few easy looking rock steps. We landed at 4,700’ and evaluated snow conditions. We decided to leave skis in the plane to save weight. This turned out to be the right choice, as skis would add another 6lbs to our 55lb packs. We immediately started walking across the glacier to the base of the ridge, roping up and avoiding a few very large crevasses. We accessed the ridge via a snow ramp on the right. This lead up around 1,000’ until we reached a low 5th class rock gully. We climbed this (in ski boots, not our forte) for a few hundred feet until it dumped us onto the snowfield below the first of four sarac hazards. It is important to mention that this route is massive. Over 11k' long, I found it helpful to mentally divide the route between 4,500’-11,000’ into four sections. Each section has a serac at the top that we would have to bypass. A lot of our route decisions were based on avoiding the fall line of these seracs as much as possible. Especially considering how clear and sunny it was on our way to camp 1. The first serac we bypassed on the right, then we continued up just outside the fall line of the second serac, passing it on the right as well. There was a rock band that was about even with the second serac that had some 4th class rock scrambling, which we solo’d. We then ascended another steep snow field to the base of the cliffs that make up the ridge crest between 9-10,000’. This takes you to a lower angle snowfield just on top of the 3rd serac wall. We made our first camp at 10,500’ at the base of some formidable looking cliffs that blocked our route up the ridge. This was a flat and somewhat sheltered camp spot, but it was in between two shallow crevasses which made for limited space. We went to bed around 9pm just after it started snowing. It snowed/slushed all night and the next morning through very warm temps. While we were stuck in the tent, we studied some of Ian’s excellent arial photographs and determined our best chance of getting around the cliffs would be to traverse horizontally about 1/2 mile to the right, and climb a steep snow gully past the 4th and final serac wall. My brother Noah sent us a forecast showing a clear weather window for a few hours in the afternoon/evening, so we used that time to push up to another great camp site at 12,200’. On day 3, it again snowed lightly all night and the next morning/afternoon. Around 4pm, the snowfall slowed and we decided to make another short push. We ascended the seemingly endless steep snow up toward the false summit, with Ian breaking trail much of the way. We were both starting to feel the altitude, and were moving much slower than we usually do. The combined vertical gain of the route over slushy snow conditions, high altitude, with heavy packs really had a cumulative effect and we felt very fatigued. Just before reaching the false summit, we started the long leftward traverse and descended down to the col at 13,600’. The ridge here was wide, but had massive cornices. Some of them starting to break away from the ridge leaving huge cracks for us to avoid. From the col we got our first glimpse of the “ice nose”, and realized it would certainly be the crux of the route. In the interest of saving time on Friday, we pushed up a bit further to 13,800’ and camped at the saddle just below the ice nose before that night’s high winds set in. The next morning, we were up at 3am and on our way towards steep ice at 5am. We went back and forth trying to decide whether the ice nose was better passed on the left or right, but eventually decided to follow the 50 Classics guidebook advice and go left. I would not say it was bypassed easily however. We swapped leads for 3 pitches of 70 degree blue ice, then popped out on the upper snow fields. Finally success was assured, and the summit was in sight. We weaved our way through the crevasse maze of the upper mountain and popped out on its rounded summit just before 10am. Unfortunately, there was an undercast around 3000’ hiding the iconic ocean views, but we could see Mount Logan and St. Elias to the North. Weather was windy, and I would estimate ambient was around -10 degrees. I was cold even in my big parka. After taking photos, we started back down the standard route towards the Grand Plateau. The descent route was less steep than the Carpe, but is also covered in crevasses forcing us to zig-zag quite a bit. We punched through a few crevasses up to our knees or waist, but they all seemed to be mostly filled with snow and ice still this early in the year. Once we reached the col at 13k, I messaged drake via inReach and let him know we were only a couple hours from the landing zone. Unfortunately, the snow below the col was consistently shin to knee deep all the way down, and was slow going. By the time we reached 11k we were very tired. I sent drake some more conditions information and he said he was on his way. It was at this point I realized that we never set up coordinates for an exact pick up location. I messaged him asking if the flat area at 10,500’ was sufficient, but it was too late. We waited just below 10,500’ and as Drake was arriving, wind was picking up and the undercast clouds were quickly rising. Drake managed to land nearby, but he was not pleased with our pick-up location choice. Lesson learned, I should have been more thorough with my questions prior to getting on the glacier. We quickly threw everything in the plane, and Drake really seemed to put his pilot expertise to the test getting off the ground. It took a long time, especially with a direct tail wind, to get airborne. We finally lifted off just as we passed over a massive crevasse that could have easily swallowed the plane. Once we were back up in the air, we were incredibly relieved. We all agreed that is not a situation that we would like to repeat. We landed back in Haines around 2:15pm and quickly packed gear, called a taxi, and made it back to the dock for the 3:15 ferry. We then reversed the rest of our travel itinerary and arrived back in Wenatchee at 3pm on Saturday. In summary, I think Carpe Ridge is a desirable climb due in most part to its sheer size and position. There are some other huge ridge climbs in the Fairweather range that look quite appealing, but none of them can compete with the Carpe for sheer size. I’m glad with the general ease with which this trip worked out, and thankful for the positive conditions we experienced. We learned a lot, and certainly affirmed a lot of our gear decisions and tactics that we can now put to the test on bigger objectives. On this climb even more than others, I had the persisting feeling that God provided for us a beautiful setting and orchestrated the weather for us to witness his creation. I am also starting to realize that God has given Ian and I a narrow skill-set that is uniquely applied to alpine climbing. There is just something about putting all the tools in my toolbox to use in a high consequence environment that leaves me with an incredible sense of accomplishment. Of course, in the end God will always have control over our successes and failures, but he has certainly granted Ian and I a great success on this trip. AllTrails: https://www.alltrails.com/explore/recording/afternoon-hike-a3ec6dd-353?u=i&sh=emzgdu Pack Wizard https://www.packwizard.com/s/7x5UAWS Wondering if I should retro-actively post a few of our other trip reports here on CC? Or would that be bad form? I have been struggling to create an account for a while now and finally got it to work.
    5 points
  3. Ian and I left Chelan at 3:30pm on Thursday before Labor day with Ian and drove North towards Kelowna. We were intending to climb something on Mount Robson, but the the afternoon update on Mountain Forecast just did not leave us the window we were hoping for. At the last possible turn-off, we switched to our backup objective. Total drive time was around 12 hours since we took the Orville border crossing and there we’re some detours due to the ongoing Forrest fires. We stopped in a state park boat launch parking area to sleep from 10pm-5am, then resumed driving until we reached the pullout on Icefeilds Parkway at 11:30am MTN. We re-packed for our new objective and started out wading across the braided Sunwapta river. The deepest section was only around thigh-deep this time of year and the water was icy cold. We ditched our wet shoes and a few excess items, then started up the steep forested trail next to Woolley Creek. The trail was very obvious, and we had downloaded a gpx track I found from Steven Song. The trail followed the creek up above the treeline, then across a series of steep rocky inclines and rocky plateaus. All of this was well marked with cairns. Once we reached around 8,000’ at the head of the valley, we filled up water and took in the incredible views of Woolley & Diadem peak and the glaciers clinging to their steep cliffs. From 8000’ up to 9,400’, the trail gets steep and loose, which is indicative of the rest of the route. We slogged up the inconsistent loose/solid scree and reached the top of the pass around 4pm. As soon as we crested the pass, we were smacked in the face by 40mph winds and our first view of the intimidating East face of Mount Alberta. The Lloyd Mackay hut was 800’ below as well, and we had plenty of daylight to get there. We descended scree, then traversed water and gravel covered slabs, and finally ascended 100’ up to the hut and outhouse. The hut is small with similar amenities to the hut on Mount Assiniboine. Since it was only 5pm, we decided to descend the 800’ additional into the valley below and find a bivy site. After reaching the valley floor, we decided to filter water and build a small new bivy site on a few flat-ish boulders. We were in our sleeping bags by 8pm, and up at 6:30am the next morning (sunrise was 7am). We left our bivy gear and started up the lower scree slope. After 700’ or so, we followed a ledge due South until we reached a short 4th class gully that lead to another 1000’ of scree or so. From this, we ascended another 4th class gully, and traversed NE and up across increasingly loose scree. At around 9,500’, we entered a long 4th class gully which we climbed inside of and on the adjacent rock bands. At the top of the gully around 10,000’, we traversed on a ledge marked by cairns around several rock ribs until we could go no further, and started heading upward towards a rap anchor. This was where we found the first 5.6 pitch which was not difficult, but worth bringing out ropes/helmets for. I belayed Ian as he lead up on our 42m rope, and we started swapping leads from here. There is a ton of loose but easy 5th class climbing, and we essentially tried to move from rap anchor to rap anchor until reaching the ridge crest at 11,400’. It took us around 7 hours to reach the ridge from camp. There had to be 10+ (short) pitches of us simuling and swapping leads with our short rope and it was far more time consuming than I had hoped. The ridge traverse is also very long, and very exposed. There is rappel around 3/4 of the way to the summit. We left our rope hanging there for the way back. The exposure is very intimidating all along. We reached the summit at 3pm, took some drone footage, then reversed the ridge. From there, it was a mix of careful rappelling and tedious downclimbing due to our rope not being full length. We finally reached the base of our 15 rappels or so at 7:30, and made the loose descent to our bivy site just before dark at 9:15pm. The mental relief of getting back to camp was immense. We quickly filtered water, ate food, and went straight to bed. We awoke around 4:30am being pelted by rain, and scrambled to pack up our belongings and make a charge for the hut, which we reached at 5:30. We ate breakfast and power napped until 9:30. From there we hiked up and over the pass in the wind and howling rain, and made the horrible descent from there back down to 8000’. This was the most miserable part of the trip due to the inconsistency of the rock quality. I snapped both trekking poles descending the pass. From there, we donned our shells and made the final soaking wet slog down to the Sunwapta river. The crossing was higher than last time, about waist deep but we managed just fine. We reached the truck at 2pm on Sunday and started the long drive back. Overall, this climb’s location is incredible, and the views of Mount Columbia and its massive icefeild were unforgettable. The massive avalanches spilling over the cliffs in the background make for a wild and intimidating setting that none of the icefeild parkway motorists will ever experience. The climbing itself mostly sucked, and even though the grade is low, it is mentally taxing for a full day with a tedious approach/deproach. Our lesson learned from this climb: bring a full length rope for the big objectives. A video of our climb: Our gear list: https://www.packwizard.com/s/NUcioL6 GPX: https://www.alltrails.com/explore/recording/mount-alberta-japanese-route-cd61a58
    5 points
  4. Historical note: Circa 1980 Wayne Kamara and I did a route 'Big Orange' to the right of Boving-Christensen with the goal of climbing the spectacular orange dihedral seen below with Wayne in it. The corner turned out to suitable for protection but was not itself 'climbable' and we traversed left, to where the Boving-Christensen meets Big Orange. A few days ago Wayne's brother Scott scanned Wayne's slides, and now the world can know. I think the arrow in my topo below saying "possible variant" is the B-C.
    3 points
  5. Jason and his AAI crew continue to support this site, providing the financial backing that pays our monthly hosting bill that keeps the lights on. We have continued gratitude for that! I also added a second advertisement to the site for NW Alpine. It's not in its final landing spot, as I've got to figure out a better way to host the advertisement. We are hosting this ad for free for a while, with Jason's blessing (AAI continues to be our sole sponsor, aside from donations from you which help pay the other costs like software licensing, etc). If you know NW Alpine, they are a local, Northwest company making great outdoor apparel.... manufacturing in the United States. In the past NW Alpine has supported Cascadeclimbers.com, so we are returning the favor as Bill Amos and company continue the battle to maintain domestic manufacturing. The ethos we see for Cascadeclimbers.com is as a local, non-corporate alternative, a community of people who share the same passion. Oh yes, we have our differences! But we are here because we love to climb, hike, ski, accumulate closets full of gear, photograph, and spray about all of it. And I think the story telling format of our TRs are the crown jewel.
    2 points
  6. What a nice and mellow chat RE drones in the wilderness.... thanks for keeping it civil everyone and thanks for listening @eeelip!
    2 points
  7. Nice trip! Thanks for the recent bunch of TRs, they have been a great distraction in the office. Just a heads up but using drones are banned in wilderness areas.
    2 points
  8. Nice work guys! I however thought Lincoln was a fine alpine route. And the views? C’mon! Baker, Assassin Spire, Colfax, Seward and the Sisters range! Hard to please ya all. good luck on getting the other 8 summits.
    2 points
  9. Trip: Mt. Worthington - JGAP Directo Trip Date: 05/11/2024 Trip Report: Worthington? Had I heard of this peak before a few days ago? Uhhh, no. I'll admit that it was Plan B after some car trouble scuttled @Trent and my's plan to bug out for a Friday car camp and early Saturday climb. Which meant that I missed most of the aurora that every raved about while I was casting about the recent aerials and maps, looking for a modestly high summit that wouldn't have much snow. Somehow Worthington caught my eye because maybe it could be worthy? To the NE side of the Olympics we would go and find out! But we couldn't just follow a gpx track and some beta, That is no fun at all. And so we went up Worthington a different way (from the east and south) than you'll find on the typical peakbagger sites. Mostly it was reasonable, but sometimes it wasn't all that pleasant. Where we left the trail it was pleasant, open forest. But then there was this was this section of softball scree, which was right after some scorest and before some steep dirt and gullies that I think the remaining fugitive goats maintain (good thing too, this was a key weakness that made this side go reasonably). Somewhere in there a couple of large rocks shot past at an alarmingly high rate of speed (fugitive goats?), which was sort of exciting. But after that it was all alpine nectar, I promise. However, I know you don't come to my TRs for beta, which would ruin all the fun. Everybody's here for the photos.... and so without further ado... 4am wakeup: First boat to Kingston: Big Quilcene pleasantness: Let the fun begin: Alpine nectar! Napping under the true summit (class 3): Constance: Tahoma: Flowers, if you're into that sort of thing: @Trent heading down with Constance and Inner Constance looking on: Gear Notes: helmet, whatever you might need for snow, if there is snow. Approach Notes: Big Quilcene Trail to Shelter Rock Camp and then up!
    2 points
  10. Hey Bill, seeing this made me take a look back through my emails to see when I bought my set of Fast/Light pants from you. It looks like I got them in January of 2011 and for whatever reason you had mailed the pants to me to try out before I paid you for them. Thanks for the great customer service back then. If there is anything that I can fault about those pants it is that they are too damn durable and they are still my go to pants for nordic skiing.
    2 points
  11. Thanks so much for the support Porter, I really appreciate it! It's hard to believe fourteen years has gone by since I started NWA. Cascadeclimbers.com was where our first customers came from, and it's been a completely wild ride since then. Though I always lurked way more than I posted, this site was a big inspiration to me when I was climbing a lot. I think it's a shame that social media has largely stolen attention from forums/communities like cc.com. It's hard to build a real community when it is mediated by a mega-corporation thats sole focus is the bottom line. Unfortunately over the last decade+, just as giant social media companies have drowned out smaller independent sites like this one, the same thing has happened in the outdoor industry generally. A handful of large corporations dominate the market and essentially form an oligopoly. Most of these brands are now publicly traded, owned by large conglomerates, or both. Even the one owned by the planet sells a billion and a half dollars worth of apparel and makes hundreds of millions in profits annually. As a small independent and self-funded brand focused on technical apparel, it's REALLY difficult to have companies with unlimited resources as your competition. And then to try to make everything in the US where the apparel manufacturing supply chain has all but disappeared...crazy. But we're doing it anyway because we think it's the right thing to do for the people and the earth. I know a lot of you care about the same things we do and if you're not familiar with NWA, please check us out. To conclude this novel, I'm super grateful for the support from Cascadeclimbers.com. It is an invaluable, independent, resource for Northwest climbers that deserves our attention now more than ever!
    2 points
  12. Asking for a friend 😉 Looking for anyone's experience with pet harnesses, especially strength rated ones for climbing. Ruffwear has their Doubleback harness that's rated to 8.9kN which seems like it would check a lot of boxes. Other thoughts were to get crafty with some Bluewater 1" tube webbing. I know a cat that's interested in sending some of the local classics. He's built like a stacked ferret, very long and medium girth so he usually fits a small dog harness. He's a shit belayer (no belay loop needed) but MAN can he run it out on some of the local slab boulder problems.
    2 points
  13. Yeah shits been like that for a while my man. Sorry. Right now focused on keeping the site around, many sites have died, good ones. We are still going. I was working on getting a better TR system in place and made progress. But then that fell apart as the developer kind of went his own direction. You can still find stuff. And yes it could be better. I'm the only one running the site from the technical side. @JasonG and a few other mods keep things clean. Honestly I'd like to eventually hand the site over to a new guard of younger folks who will not commercialize the site and keep the community aspect alive...but also can make it better. Life has been taking me personally in a lot of different directions, but I still love this site and am committed to keeping it going. Also invite new energy and drive, but it has to be selfless, and directed towards keeping this going like a non-profit entity. Thankfully we have a great sponsor in the American Alpine Insitute, and we have had generous donations from the users of the site. There is a TON of great stories here, and they continue to grow. We will find a way to keep that alive.
    2 points
  14. Yocum Ridge was on our objective list for this winter. Initially, I was thinking sometime in March or late Feb would be optimal conditions. On Thurs 2/1, I was perusing Mountain Forecast and noticed that the temperatures on Hood were still quite cold, despite the unseasonable warmth in the rest of the PNW. Wind/visibility for Sat looked excellent. I also found some photos from a couple days prior of the South side, and the rime ice coverage looked quite good. I texted Ian, and he responded right away with a “lets do it”. On Fri he met me at work in Cashmere at 3:45pm and we left for Oregon. At 8:45pm we were skinning up the cat track towards the top of the Palmer chair lift. With Ian carrying our 70m rope, we were able to sustain around 2,600’ of gain to the top of Palmer in around 90min. From there we left the cat track and traversed another 800’ up to Illumination Saddle, arriving at 11pm sharp. We set up the tent, made dinner, and were sleeping by midnight. We awoke at 6am to start the morning routine. I got breakfast and water started while Ian prepped gear. We were on the move by 7:20am, just behind three pairs of climbers on the Leuthold Couloir route. We quickly descended and crossed the Reid Glacier and gained the ridge at 8,800’. The first 700’ of ridge climbing was very fast, and conditions were perfect. Firm snow made for one-swing sticks. At the base of the first gendarme, we set up belay and I lead two short pitches to the top. The rime was still quite solid and easy to climb. Protection was with pickets. We ended up using pickets, a couple cams, and a couple ice screws on route, but mostly pickets. From there, we slung the top of the gendarme and with no way to ease into the rappel, I jumped off the top. The rappel was very awkward and mostly sideways along the ridge. Ian followed, and we traversed a longer section of moderate simul-climbing terrain on the serrated ridge crest. I made it to a ledge shortly after and in the rising sun, I changed into my t-shirt and belayed Ian up. The terrain on this part of the climb is amazing. The rime ice formations are sharp and huge. Coupled with the blue skies and views of the other Cascade volcanoes it makes for a very unique and beautiful setting for the technical climbing. We simul-climbed the ridge crest past the less-remarkable 2nd gendarme on the South side, and up the 3rd gendarme. We then made a similarly awkward traversing rappel from the top. This time I had to take out an ice tool while on rappel to get around an awkward tower and back to the ridge crest. The rope reached just far enough to get past the scary terrain. From there, I called out “off belay”. Ian pulled his backup picket and came down as well. From here, we solo’d up the ridge to the base of the massive upper buttress. I entered a forking gully at the base, and decided to go left. This lead to a nice flat bench, where I re-organized my pack a bit and called my wife. Meanwhile Ian pulled the rope, packed it up, and carried it through the moderate terrain up to the bench. I often like to joke that Ian is basically the guide and I am just a privileged client. He is often willing to do 90% of the work on a route without a single complaint, which sometimes makes me feel guilty. At the bench, we switched the rope to my pack and Ian took a turn leading us up to a very intimidating looking rime-ice headwall. From what I have read, not many people, if any, actually go to the top of this thing. It’s much bigger than the gendarmes, and we attempted two vertical routes to get up it. Ian tried both unsuccessfully. I was feeling good and gave it a shot, only to have the rime beneath my feet, then knees, then ice picks all give out and I took a good 15’ fall. Up until this point, we were making very good time, but we burned over an hour trying to scrape up the headwall. We decided to try the right branch of the gully, and ended up rappelling a full 35m down into a 60 degree gully. I would have liked to try and find a way up the upper buttress, but we were starting to run out of time, and I believe most other parties (if not all) also made the 3rd rap down into the gully like we did. This rappel was the only place that we deviated from the ridge crest on the climb. Once in the gully, we crawled upward until reaching a 15’ vertical step. Ian managed to lead up, build an anchor using a picket, and belay me. From there, we were able to follow the rest of the gully up to the ridge crest again. By then it was 3pm. We could see the top of the Leuthold route, and the last of the groups we left with was just heading up to the false summit. We solo’d around lots of unstable rime formations on the South side of the ridge, and finally reached the end of the technical difficulties. We stopped there at around 10,600’ to melt water and we were both exhausted. That is not the easiest 1,800’ of climbing one can do. We haggardly slogged our way up to summit and reached it at 4:20pm in warm, windless conditions. The views were amazing, and I sat there on my knees for around 10min just resting and enjoying the scenery. After taking photos, we followed the bootpack down the South-side route, past the sulfur vents and back to our tent at Illumination Saddle. We packed up in around an hour as darkness was setting in. Not wanting to ski down in the dark, we forwent dinner and skied decent powder down toward Timberline Lodge as the last rays of sun disappeared. We made it back to the truck in the dark at 6:15pm. We then proceeded to crank the heat up and beeline for the Hood River McDonalds. 4 hours and 4 cheeseburgers later, I made it home to my wife and one-month old baby girl, Navy. GPX Track: https://www.alltrails.com/explore/recording/mount-hood-yocum-ridge-2c8ed85 Gear List: https://www.packwizard.com/packs Video:
    1 point
  15. Ian and I left at 1am from Wenatchee to bag our 2nd peak on the “WA Difficult 10” list with Ian. We were initially thinking of attempting the index traverse, but there is too much snow and we only had Sunday 5/12/24 available. At around 5pm on Sat, I suggested switching objectives and Ian immediately texted back that he was in. Spontaneity is one of the many reasons he is an excellent climbing partner. The drive took over 5hrs due to McDonalds stop in Burlington waiting for a Burger (no breakfast before 4am ). We arrived at the top of the last switchback on NF-38 and started hiking around 5:45am after a prolonged decision making process whether we should take skis or not. We finally decided to take them since it would save time on the descent. We moved slowly but surely up the overgrown trail, moving alder branches out of the way and ducking our skis underneath. We reached the open plateau at 5,000’ around 7am. From there it was a quick skin up to 6,000’ where we stopped for breakfast. The summit looked so close from our break-spot that I was convinced we’d be home by 6pm or so. Conditions looked optimal, with hardly any crevasses exposed. We ditched skis at camp after briefly debating whether we could ski the route from the summit. At 8:45 we started the short traverse over to the bowl that funnels into the couloir system leading to the summit. The snow was knee deep and we took turns breaking trail, but still expended a ton of energy in the first part of the ascent. This route is South-West facing, and didn’t see sun until around 11:30. This helped negate most of the rockfall risk, but it was still warm enough that the snow remained mostly slushy except in the runnels. Another thing that didn’t help was our underestimating the length of the route from camp. 3,000’ of steep snow is a solid day’s work, and it took us until 1pm to reach the summit. The top is in view for most of the route, and just seemed to keep getting farther and farther away as we got higher. The route, however, kept looking easier and easier as we got closer. At around 7,000’ we ditched trekking poles, the rope, and our pro as we were confident we could solo the gullies all the way to the top. After another few hundred feet, we crossed a bergshrund (barely visible to us) and continued slogging up the first gully. At around 7,800’ we stopped and took a lunch break and melted a liter of water each. This is when I realized I had accidentally grabbed a nearly empty fuel canister, and had used it all the fuel that remained in one sitting. Bummer. We continued up from our lunch spot traversing over to the second gully. Same slushy snow. The sun finally crested the ridge above us and immediately started beating down. We moved slowly due to the snow conditions and heat, but kept moving until we topped out the second gully and traversed left into the final gully. Ian and I parted ways, as he took the standard gully on the left, while I took a shaded gully on the right that was a bit steeper but seemed more solid. We met up 20min or so later just under the summit, where I had to scoot across a snow ridge with thousands of feet of exposure on each side. Lesson learned: stick to the gpx track. We arrived on top, took photos and some drone footage, then started the backwards down-climbing/postholing. The descent was quite miserable. It was so hot that I was getting sunburned despite 70 spf sunscreen. The snow was so wet and slushy that we got completely soaked. It took only two hours to get back to our skis, but it was not enjoyable. From there, we plowed through the slush down into the trees, where we eventually decided it was faster to just posthole since the trees were so close together. We reached the old forest road/trail around 4pm, then skinned and walked back the way we had come up back to Ian’s car. We started the drive home around 5:30pm and arrived home just before 10pm. Overall, we were not terribly impressed with this climb. It is not very technical, nor aesthetic, and the views were nothing spectacular. I’m glad we got it checked off, but this one really is just a check mark. GPX Track: https://www.alltrails.com/explore/recording/lincoln-peak-x-couloir-040d45c Gear List: https://www.packwizard.com/s/Vjgacgh Video:
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  16. What a prime adventure. I absolutely love wandering the muskegs and ridge tops in that area of the world. The alpine environment is so close to sea level. I need to retire and go do more of that.
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  17. I've thought about this one for years, but I can't remember how I got the idea. It's done occasionally by Sitka locals. I'd be happy to share my track via PM. Next up: a packraft traverse of Admiralty Island, or maybe a climb of Peak 5390--Baranof Island's highest point in photo #3.
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  18. Epic in the truest sense of the word! Is that just super lucky with the weather or were you lying in wait for a window? And how did you ever get the idea for this trip in particular, of all the Alaskan adventures to be had? Can you post a map of the rough route or would that spoil the fun?
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  19. Hey Eli, thanks for the write up on Carpe...hoping we can fly in tomorrow. I just noticed this report you have for Lincoln, and was wondering if you, or anyone else here knows if Tom S is still the only person who has completed the Difficult 10? I'm trying to finish them myself...hmu if you're interested. Cheers!
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  20. Totally agree! What a great adventure....to read about.
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  21. Quality trip report! Reminds me of the days of yore on this website. Chossdawgs have my full respect, that climb looks nerve wracking.
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  22. My dream climb! I wondered if it was even doable nowadays after The Smiley Project showed it deteriorating severely some ten or fifteen years ago. Thanks for sharing your trip with a now-62 year old guy who will likely miss this one in person. 🙂
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  23. Trip: Mt. Hood - Eliot Glacier/Sunshine Route Trip Date: 05/31/2024 Trip Report: We set out on Friday afternoon from the Tilly Jane Trailhead with Mt. Hood as our objective via the northside Sunshine Route. We had cool temps and blue skies which made for a great approach, but the forecast was calling for weather to move in Saturday afternoon with a significant amount of precipitation Saturday night into Sunday. The goal was to camp high on route Friday, summit Saturday morning, then descend the same route and get out before weather hit. Mt. Hood on the drive in from the north: Sunshine Route (Anderson Rock & Horseshoe Rock): We met two climbers at the trailhead who just finished a car-to-car of the Sunshine Route that morning so they were able to provide beta on the route. Conditions sounded great. They chose to descend the south side of Hood to their second car at Timberline and drive back to the trailhead, but said descending the route would be fine. This inspired confidence because while descending the route isn't unheard of, most parties will carry-over to avoid the downclimb. We considered a carry-over, but preferred to keep pack weights low on summit day. After leaving the trailhead we made our way up the dry ski trail to the Tilly Jane A-Frame where we first encountered snow. From there we followed the footprints in the direction of the Cooper Spur Trail and soon we were at the Cooper Spur shelter for a quick break before making our way towards the Eliot Glacier. A large cairn marked the start of the climbers trail down the moraine which we followed to begin the glacier crossing. The snow was quite warm by then which made for some deep steps while crossing the glacier, but at least we weren't postholing. No glacier gear was needed here. A short time later we were ascending the ramp on the climber's right of the glacier which put us on the main approach to the Sunshine Route. We climbed further to 8,450' where we decided to set up camp for the night. After making some water for the following day and having a bite, we tried to get some sleep. We were the only party on the Sunshine Route. Eliot Glacier: The morning came fast and the temp dropped into the mid-30s with an increasing breeze. We reluctantly got up and were back on the move at 6:30a, but this time with lighter packs and donning crampons. There was still a view of the upper mountain and summit, but the clouds were moving in quickly. We continued upwards towards the first steep feature of the route: Anderson Rock. Base of Anderson Rock with Horseshoe Rock above: Typically one would skirt Anderson Rock to the climber's right but as we were informed by the other climbers, there was already an established boot pack directly up the center because of the nice snow coverage. We took advantage of the steps from the previous parties and started up Anderson Rock. I had a single axe ready while my partner had one tool. The lower portion was steep snow which made climbing easy and secure, but higher up where the slope steepened (50+ deg) and had thinner snow coverage it turned into ice. I retrieved my tool for more security while my partner managed the icy section with his single. The ice had good purchase so after a bit of front pointing we were through it and on the more gradual slope leading up to Horseshoe Rock. Just finishing Anderson Rock: The bergschrund below Horseshoe Rock was filled in and looked to be passable at several locations which opened up many options for the ascent. Once again, the previous parties went straight up the middle and we could see the boot pack. We considered following, but were unsure if we would encounter similar icy conditions at some point. We opted to take the route to the climber's right of Horseshoe Rock thinking that would avoid any icy slopes. We remained unroped and after crossing the 'schrund we had a short traverse to gain the slopes to the right. The snow was just right and allowed for easy steps and axe plunging as we continued up the steep slopes (45+ deg). I used my axe and tool and my partner had two tools. With the snow conditions we had one could get by with a single axe, but I didn't mind the extra point of contact with both of us soloing. Fortunately we did not encounter any ice. The upper section did have a light crust, but it did not impact our climbing. With one step and axe plunge at a time, we cruised up the slope towards Cathedral Ridge. We did take a more direct route which put us on 55+ degree snow just below the ridge, but this could have been avoided by meandering climber's right slightly. Nevertheless, we were soon on the ridge and had nothing but easy climbing to the summit. By now the clouds were moved in but we still caught the occasional glimpse of the upper slopes. Soon we were on the main summit ridge where we encountered a couple parties that were climbing the main south side route and after a quick traverse we reached the summit in the clouds. We took a short break for pictures and food and water before making our way back down. Summit Ridge: Summit: By this time the upper mountain was fully in the clouds so we had poor visibility and had to rely on following our tracks back to where we gained Cathedral Ridge. We started the downclimb, facing into the slope and retracing our steps one at a time. Foot. Foot. Axe. Axe. Repeat. In short order we were crossing the bergschrund again and at the top of Anderson Rock. By this time the snow/ice had softened up so the upper section downclimbed fairly easily. After that it was off to the races and we plunge-stepped back to camp. Downclimbing Anderson Rock: Under the occasional light rain shower we packed up camp and started our descent out of the weather and back to the trailhead to complete a successful Mt. Hood trip! The Sunshine Route was great. Not super technical but the steep snow kept it interesting. And the views (when we had them) we're amazing. This was my first time on Mt. Hood and am wondering why it took me so long to get down there. I'll be back! Weather moving in: Approximate route up Anderson Rock and Horseshoe Rock: Day 1 2:00pm Start Tilly Jane Trailhead (3,820') to Camp (8,450'), 5hr20m, +4,630' Day 2 6:30am Start Camp (8,450') to Summit (11,249'), 4hr30m, +2,800' Summit (11,249') to Camp (8,450'), 2hr00m, -2,800' Camp (8,450') to Tilly Jane Trailhead (3,820'), 2hr45m, -4,630' Gear Notes: We brought 4 pickets and a few screws. We each had two axes. If we pitched it out the pickets would have come in handy. Screw(s) would have been useful for protecting the icy section we encountered on Anderson Rock, but the ice could have been avoided by going climber's right around Anderson Rock. If you manage to stay only on steep snow, a single axe could be enough but it wouldn't hurt to have a second just in case. Approach Notes: Approach via Tilly Jane and Cooper Spur Trail, then turn right at the Cooper Spur Shelter to cross the Eliot Glacier (moraine crossing marked large cairn). Cross Eliot Glacier and ascend snow ramp on right side at ~7,500' to gain the slope to the main route.
    1 point
  24. thanks for sharing ... great photos and write up
    1 point
  25. Cool climb and write up. I love these Canadian TRs popping up recently.
    1 point
  26. Wow - congrats that is a massive route! Way to nail the weather window!!
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  27. Keep them coming eeelip! Thanks for the TR, it looked like quite the adventure.
    1 point
  28. Not bad form to share old TRs at all! This place is for sharing stories new and old. Thank you, great pictures and everything. If you ever have issues with the site again, there is a Contact Us form at the bottom of the page and I will help you. Thanks for sharing!
    1 point
  29. No. But here is another option similar in all specs. Due to the yen vs the dollar makes it bargain a compared to that tent. Looks like there is another order window in July. https://locusgear.com/products/djedi-dcf-b I have a Locus Gear tent (not this one), and the quality is top notch.
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  30. Not in the least! We love it all, past or present. Well done on a major objective!
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  31. Way to (Allen) Carpe diem on a beautiful line.
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  32. aww, i miss me too - the world went and got Awful Silent
    1 point
  33. "Well, this is gonna be interesting.... The website is https://statisticalclimbingguideforfredbeckey.webador.com/articles and was also posted then deleted on NWHikers.net. The links to the articles don't work for me now. Prior to the abrupt about-face, I skimmed through Chapter 18 regarding his Army service & discharge. It painted a less than flattering portrait but seemed to have plenty of documentation. Mr. Creeden has also posted other interesting historical info on NWHikers. AI spoof (seems unlikely but wtf knows these days), the heavy hand of moderation, legal threats, and/or just second thoughts and wanting to save it all for the definitely "not published by the Mountaineers" book? Inquiring minds want to know." Fred Beckey(TM) https://www.fredbeckeyllc.com/ UBI: 604-172-710. "Governing people": Megan Bond. Just so it's all in one place for posterity and such...
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  34. i never left. the footprints are when i carried you
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  35. Appreciate it guys! We are still taking funds for the site, there is a button to donate. AAI, our sponsor, pays our monthly server hosting bill, which is huge. Without that, I would be continuously bugging you guys for money or be faced with turning things off. Think a never-ending public radio fund drive. That would suck. But Cascadeclimbers.com also has its own fund that you all contribute to, and the money is used to pay for software licensing, domain name costs, things like that. We also *could* use funds for paying a developer, but for now there just isn't enough to do that. What would be awesome is if we could find a climber who is also a developer and good with PHP/MSQL who has the time and energy to help solve a few problems for the site. But also understand that we need this developer(s) to have bought in to how we are running the site. Myself and all the moderators who participate are doing this without pay. We do it to keep the community/site going. Any developer working with use has to be ok with that and do it for the love of the site and community. Regarding the site, there are a few things I would like to at least consider changing, and obviously recreating the search function would be nice. We also have image issues that may be fixed in bulk with code. We may also want to consider moving from Invision forums at some point as I'm not super enamored with the support and direction the software is going, but given the current landscape of the products in this space it may be the best option.
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  36. Sam - I pretty much have everything. Send me an email to remind me and I can send you some stuff.
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  37. Also interested in lending a hand where I can. Always happy to throw some pennies towards the @olyclimber coffee/beer fund. I'll nudge some of the LTown posters that I know to get back to work on trip reports here. Raising kids and being busy with life is temporary; shitposting on CC.com is forever.
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  38. Hi! I stumbled upon this site recently. It’s amazing! I mainly use it to view trip reports. I have no tech skills or experience, but I am interested in keeping this site alive and non-profit. Let me know if there is any way I can volunteer
    1 point
  39. https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/video-captures-cougar-chasing-pets-coming-within-feet-of-family-in-wa-backyard/ar-BB1mopOr dang I can’t seem to escape these dang cats!
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  40. Trip: Choral Peak - North Face Trip Date: 05/05/2024 Trip Report: Choral Peak First Ascent of North Face (WI3 M3 Steep Snow, 300m) May 5, 2024, 12:30am – 6pm 18 miles, 5kft gain Nick and Eric Starting up the first pitch In late April 2020 I was skiing Choral and Gopher, two top 200 peaks in the Entiat River drainage, and I noticed a big ice line on the north face of Choral. I was going solo and didn’t have climbing equipment, but I vowed to return again and try to climb it. The route Access to the area is a bit difficult when the ice is in season. The road is generally either snowed over or gated during ice season, adding many miles to the approach. On that trip patchy snow had started on the road 10 miles before the trailhead. I’d skied in partway then road walked the rest in my ski boots, then hiked farther in to get to snow line to start skiing. Usually between December and early April the entiat river road is a snowmobile route for the last 10 miles to the trailhead. Then sometime in April when the snow partially melts the road is gated 6 miles before the trailhead until sometime in May. I have a snowmobile now, but I’ve been prioritizing Bulger peaks in the winter and never got around to the climb. Finally in November 2023 I decided to give it a try. The road was still snow-free to the trailhead but I was hopeful maybe enough ice had formed for the route to be climbable. Francis and I were able to drive to the trailhead and skin from there. We got to the base of the route, but the ice was extremely thin and sketchy looking. So we bailed and instead skied Gopher. Closeup of route I again prioritized Bulgers this winter, and by early May I thought I’d give Choral another try. I suspected this would be the time of year with the thickest ice. The ice is between 7,000ft – 7,500ft on a shaded gully on a north face with a snow bowl above feeding it. That likely won’t start melting down until mid May in a normal year. Based on recent satellite images the road was snow-free to the trailhead, but I expected it to be gated 6 miles before the trailhead (as it has been in previous years in early May). So we planned to bring bikes for the road section. The satellite image showed the trail mostly snow-free. I’ve previously biked that trail, and it could save a lot of time. It’s popular with dirt bikers to access Myrtle Lake, so gets cleared semi regularly. So the plan was to bike as far as possible, maybe to the wilderness boundary near Myrtle Lake, then bushwhack straight up to Choral. This was the route I’d taken in November and it had worked well. The route viewed from Gopher Peak Because less than half of the approach was snow we decided to leave the skis at home and snowshoe. We would do a car to car trip to avoid carrying the extra weight of overnight gear. Sunday looked like perfect weather for the trip – cloudy and cool, with just a slight chance of afternoon snow showers. Biking up the trail Saturday evening we drove to Entiat River Road, and were surprised to find the gate open! We drove the whole way to the trailhead, and it looked like the road had recently been logged out. We got a few hours of sleep then were up and moving by 12:30am Sunday. Amazingly, the trail was completely logged out too! The area is in a recent burn zone so every year many trees fall over the trail. But it appeared some dirt bikers had just gone in and cleared it out. We had fun biking up the low-angle trail. I was occasionally stopped by my chain getting stuck in the front derailleur (I had forgotten to lube it before). But we soon made it to patchy snow at the Myrtle Lake turnoff. Bushwhacking to Choral The dirtbike tracks turned off, and bikes no longer made sense in the snow with blowdowns likely. So we locked them to a tree and continued on foot. We hiked another mile to the wilderness boundary, then cut up right into the woods. I found an easy open route and we made fast progress up the slope. Around 3am near snowline we stopped to rest and I noticed my headlamp light reflecting off two eyes about 50 ft away. We both turned our headlamps to full power and it was a cougar sitting there looking at us! I wasn’t too thrilled to have it following us, so I chucked a snowball at it and it bolted back away. Luckily we never saw it again. Approaching the climb Around 5,500ft we hit continuous snow and switched to snowshoes. Skis would have been nice, but I appreciated not having to carry the extra weight on the approach. We made fast time to a flat bowl at 5800ft, then topped off water in Choral Creek. We then continued to the north face of Choral Peak by sunrise. This time the ice was nice and fat, even better than the time I had first seen it in April 2020! Maybe a few extra weeks of spring melt-freeze cycles got more ice forming. We ditched snowshoes and one pack at the base then cramponed up the snow to the base of the ice. Nick on the first pitch We built a rock anchor on the wall on the right and I took the first lead. I climbed up over a fun ice bulge, then followed a snow ramp to the base of the main flow. From there I had several options. Straight up the middle or up the left looked steepest, probably WI4. The right side was lower angle and went through an interesting constriction/chimney between the ice and rock. That looked fun, so I continued that way. Following the second pitch I got a few rock pieces on the wall then the ice steepend. I ran out of gear and rope at the base of the chimney and built an anchor there. As I was belaying there was occasional spindrift flying down the face and covering me in powder. I guess it had snowed a few inches of fresh powder on Saturday and that was now blowing down. Luckily it wasn’t enough to be conerning. Nick followed up then took the next lead. He wriggled up through the chimney and found a nice ice ledge shortly above for a two-screw anchor. I followed, and the chimeny was pretty fun. I could lean my butt against the rock and kick my crampons in the snow. It was easy to take breaks. The rock made swinging the tools a bit trickier though. The third pitch After reaching Nick I continued on the next pitch. I followed the line of least resistance, which was traversing left to the middle of the face, then climbing up over another bulge. I then traversed to the left side of the face and got in a nut in a crack. I had three screws left and it looked like just enough to reach the top of the ice. From there I expected I would reach trees or have cracks in the rock on the side. I put my last screw on near the top of the final ice bulge, then found good rock pro on the side. I ran the rope out to its end and found a nice tree to build an anchor. Nick followed, and from there we unroped and continued up the steep snow. The snow was surprisingly powdery for May, and trail breaking was challenging. We definitely should have brought our ascent plates. We took turns, and when I was in front I had to clear snow with my hands, then with my knee, then pack down with my foot, then step up. It took a while. Climbing up the steep snow Finally I reached the rocky headwall and traversed up and left on a good ledge. The ledge ended at some small trees and the terrain above us steepened. We decided to rope back up there. Pitch 4 Nick took over and led up, climbing what turned out to be the crux of the route, an M3 mixed pitch. I followed up and there were a few interested rocky sections partially covered in snow. I had fun hooking ledges, torquing some cracks, and balancing my frontpoints on small rock features. Mixed Pitch I met Nick at a rock anchor then I led the final short pitch. I climbed snow and rock and managed to get a hex in a good crack. Finally I topped out just left of the summit cornice and slung a tree. Nick soon arrived and we unroped there and made the short snow scramble over to the summit by 1pm. On the summit We were treated to amazing views of snowy peaks in all directions, and it looked very wintery. The afternoon snow showers were still holding off, but it was nice and cloudy so the sun wasn’t warming things up to much. We soon returned to the rope, packed up, and headed down. I kind of wished I had skis then, but they would have been challenging to carry up the climb. We plunge stepped down the east ridge to Choral Lake, then wrapped around the north face back to our stashed gear. We made quick progress back down to the trail and soon reached our bikes. Biking out The bike ride out was amazing, and I got some practice with taking gopro footage through some stream crossings. By 6pm we were back to the truck, just as a light rain started, and we were soon driving home. Gear Notes: 60m rope, ice screws, hexes, double rack of cams to 2", ice tools Approach Notes: Bike to Myrtle Lake turnoff, bushwhack to base of route
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  41. wow. that was a near miss for sure! I admire your offer to eat the TR though. I hope it stands an FA, but if not, I recommend some good hot sauce as a condiment.
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  42. maybe they should focus on reintroducing glaciers.
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  43. Thanks for the fun trip Sean. Such a beautiful setting, relaxing first day at camp, engaging route, and wild summit. Yeah snow routes in the cascades are sketchy these days. When do you think was the last time that couloir got a good freeze this year? But though the snow was sketchy the rock was better than expected. Definitely some looseness but a lot of compact chunky greenschist reminiscent of the Fisher Chimneys. Fun scrambling. We greatly benefited from all the mistakes and mishaps of others over the years--I fully believe there is some terrible rock on this peak and I'm glad we got to avoid it. Very surprised to be the only names in the register since 2018. Let's see some ascents! The north face/ridge route looks cool too and then you don't have to climb over the bergschrund!
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  44. Climbing Ranger Blog from here: https://mountrainierclimbing.blogspot.com/2022/06/upper-mountain-skiing-and-snowboarding.html?fbclid=IwAR0oypputNf8ec71zX-XZTzJnz-3NImMlJJvIGXT2eXatgfSddz9IFwlsw4 While it's not in the forecast yet, there will be an end to the persistent series of 'wet season-like' storms that have been pasting the mountain with snow. When the weather does stabilize we expect to see an influx of skiers looking to take advantage of what could be very good conditions. Please keep the following things in mind, though, before rushing to the mountain. 1) Give the snowpack time to stabilize 2) Just because you're on skis it doesn't make you safer. 3) Climbing with ski/snowboard gear takes more effort and is slower. 4) Timing is everything. A ski/snowboard descent of Mt Rainier can be a wonderful and exhilarating experience. It can also be terrifying and extremely dangerous. It should never be taken lightly and for mountaineers with very little climbing and skiing/snowboarding experience it may not be at all appropriate in many conditions.
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  45. I've heard a number of reports of new routes up there in recent years. In every case it sounded like this: "I got permission to put up a new route, which I did. It's great. But the land managers made me agree to not tell anyone where it is." Maybe someone should ride their snowmobile up the west side of Si...
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  46. Yep, best viewed from afar.... crappy rock, even on the steep stuff. Reminded me of "Jenga".... dont pull out the wrong piece! Found a way to access the face that seemed to avoid private property. Lots of snow up top still....
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  47. Erik, As a guide I get this question often, and would like to answer your question in a more constructive way (rather than telling horror stories and spreading common misconceptions). The first thing you should understand about glaciers is the difference between a “wet” and a “dry” glacier. A wet glacier is a glacier (or section of a glacier) that still has seasonal snow on it. A dry glacier is a glacier (or section of a glacier) that has no seasonal snow on it (i.e., bare ice). The rules on when to rope up are purely a personal choice, but the following are generally agreed to by most professional climbers and/or guides: · If you are traveling on a “wet” glacier there is still a chance of hidden crevasses as well as the possibility to self arrest (in seasonal snow). There fore we rope up approximately 25-35 feet between climbers (this measurement applies to the cascades and may be different in other ranges depending on the size of crevasses). While traveling roped you should maintain a comfortably snug line between you and your partners (the rope should make a smiley face between you and your partner) · If you are traveling on “dry” glacier it is ok and often times more desirable and safer to travel un-roped. The reason being is that you can clearly see all the dangers, and you should for the most part be able to rely upon proper technique (i.e., French/German technique, and proper ice axe use) to avoid falling into a hole. The reason traveling roped can be dangerous on a dry glacier is that if one person falls, and there is no form of ice protection or a proper belay it is very unlikely that you will be able to self-arrest and hold the fall in ice. Often times you want the security or a rope on dry glacier (such as when you climb through a steep ice fall) but then it is best to use ice pro (screws, thread through, bollard, natural features) and proper belay techniques which will hold the max anticipated load. Last but not least, if you are unsure about how to properly rope up, rescue, use crampons and ice axe properly, and judge objective and subjective danger, I would highly recommend obtaining proper instruction from a trained professional. Reading books is a great start, but as you have learned from this dialogue leave many unanswered questions. Regards, and be safe. Tom Dancs
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