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RuMR

Has anyone ever take a significant

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I took a year off to travel, but that was after grad school so it was a natural break that may be rather different from your situation.

 

Before going, I talked to several of my advisors/colleagues. I got two responses:

 

1 - I never took time off and really wish I had.

2 - I took time off and it was the best thing I ever did and I wish I had taken more.

 

At the time, I had no wife, kids, mortgage, significant other responsibilities. Now I do have all of those things, and I am doubly glad to have gone when I did.

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I can echo those sentiments. I've taken two extended "sabbaticals" in my life. First one was after I quit college the first time. Rode a motorcycle from northern VA to Daytona Beach, then to LA/Huntington Beach, then halfway back across the country. It took something like 6 months. That was 1980. I didn't yet climb.

 

Eight years later, after finally matriculating from VA Tech (second try), I drove my dirtbag Volvo from northern VA to Walla Walla. That took something like 5 months. But at least I climbed along the way!

 

At neither time was I encumbered by wife, kids, mortgage, significant other responsibilities. Now I do have all of those things, and I am doubly glad to have gone both times when I did (apologies to Rad for borrowing the phrase).

 

Crikey! My last "sabbatical" was 20 years ago this month! I'm sooooooooo due for another...

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I have to share this link... a friend of mine and his wife and kid quit the jobs, loaded up the boat and sailed away. I find it very inspirational!

 

http://sailboatpelagic.blogspot.com/

 

I've taken a few summers off - but I work for myself so it doesn't really count.

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Everything I've read says statistics show that taking a maternity leave for that long does indeed harm your overall career. I guess it would be hard to prove to yourself though b/c you really don't know what opportunities may have opened up for you while you were gone. Nor do you know the long-term impact until you get there.

But maybe all that is changing now. I doubt it though.

 

This was not maternity leave. She took the minimum when her kids were born and was bored out of her mind with the first one. With the second she started working again when her baby was four days old. When she decided to do the sabbatical her kids were 10 and 8. It was supposed to be a year. She was enjoying it so much she asked for a second year and they said yes. But they cannot wait to get her back and she's pretty much getting whatever she wants when she goes back! So it did not hurt her at all. Though she's very smart and has worked for them since graduation and really made a name for herself there so that's all in her favor.

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Are you afraid they won't notice that you're gone?

No...not at all...

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Right now is not the time to jeopardize your job. When you are ready to come back, the market may not be very welcoming.

Funny you should say that A...that is one of the things keeping me from squeezing the trigger...the other one is this damn "guilt" shit...everytime i get serious about it, i read about food shortages, talk to a bum, blah blah blah...

 

seriously, my company would take me back...its an awesome company, my fellow staff absolutely rock, my boss is really solid and respectable, the projects are world class...i'm just siiiiiick of it...i feel so bad about not liking it anymore...

 

this is why i haven't bothered to look at other firms...i don't think i can beat this one...or my job...i just don't want do it anymore...

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Brian-

Was it a job she really wanted back?

 

Rudy-

If you don't really care if you get this job back, go ahead and go. If you do want it back, perhaps you should get something in writing. Maybe even have it reviewed by/consult with an attorney that specializes in employment law... I'm just sayin', look what happened to Dryad...

Sobo, as i responded to Arch, this is my dream job...that's why i haven't said "FUCK THIS"...i'm just burnt out, and the worst part is i don't want to feel that way...

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sounds like you need a break to recharge and find the passion again. continuing in the status quo is likely to breed resentment and result in an unhappy ending.

 

Dr. Ruth signing out.

 

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I went through a period of hating my job a couple years ago.

I just didn't care about all the stuff I used to. I would sit in meetings and just zone out. That is not my style.

 

Eventually, I was found out and just told my boss, my heart just isn't in it anymore. I was laid off and took a long vacation. When I came back, it was on my terms, at a different company, and I was ready to get back into it.

I am still gaining in terms of enjoying my job. It was just the right thing to do at the right time.

My situation was kind of bad and I did not really care about the position and the company was on the chopping block anyway.

 

In your position, I would advise total honesty and open communications. Leave them liking you so you can come back easily. If you do not like your job, or just need a solid break, it will show in many ways.

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Yup, I took 6 months off to travel in 2004. My job offered me a leave of absence but couldn't promise to hold my position for when I got back, and sure enough, they didn't. But since I was technically still employed while on leave, and got laid off when I got back, I didn't have a huge gap in my resume and collected unemployment when I got back. Better deal than if I had just quit, which I was willing to do anyway. I can't say I was heartbroken about losing that job. After a somewhat depressingly long period of unemployment, I went on to get a much better job in Boston at almost 2x the salary, way more time off (5 weeks/yr when you add up vacation, personal days, and company Xmas closure), better job security, less stress, and all that good stuff. And to top it off, after moving I was able to reconnect with an old friend who has since moved in with me and last night baked me a pie. I can't promise that you too will meet a wonderful pie-baking man upon your return, but taking time off to travel was a great experience and I have absolutely no regrets. Go do it!

Edited by dryad

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Yeb, Took a month and went to Kona. Spent my time living in a tent on the hill side. Had just split with the Ex wife of 22 years and needed some space and time to ponder by place in the world and future goals. The company I work for was understanding knowing that I would come back better then when I left. Its good to Clear Your head of everyday things, like computers, cell phones, customer pressure.

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Lotta good advice here, and it really sounds like you need a break Rudy. You'll be worth more to the company if you enjoy being there again when you return, and if they don't want you back, then maybe it's not really your dream job anyway.

 

I've never heard anyone wish they'd worked more before they died, so if you can work it financially and your family is behind you, you should give it a shot. Maybe this will be the year you get into skiing.

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Lotta good advice here, and it really sounds like you need a break Rudy.

 

Why dont you just take a break from spray? You will feel better after a couple months.....

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My company provides a paid 8 week sabbatical every 7 years of employment for US based employees... the year you take it you also receive your vacation so for that year you get a total of 11-12 weeks off paid.

 

I'm fairly certain most global companies do something similar to even out the # of days worked as international employees get many many more days off per year than US based workers.

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well they have to make it fair for the euros who are used to taking a month off or more a year ;)

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I took a couple of years off (not a sabbatical though) when my second was born after the wife went back to work (she had a better job than me at the time). However, I'd been squirreling money away and could easily pay my 1/2 of the bills- which is what we have always done. I found that doing rentals with the kids was easy, as you could plop a bassinett in a corner and paint the walls with the 5 year old helping by painting the lower part with a brush and then me rolling over it, that kind of thing.

 

I tried to start a sign company as well, but during an install I realized that it clashed with having kids so I stopped it.

 

Not only do I have no regrets, it was an amazing time. When the lil one was old enough to get into a local program that had an amazingly great "teacher", he went in and I went looking for a job. The wife and I balanced duties from there out. I'm handing around the house right now as I type this waiting for my sons driving test. He graduated early from HS few months back, but didn't care if he had a car till now as he's trying to keep his costs down.

 

I think a lot of it is dependent on your own financial profile and skill set. We had low costs and saved our scratch, never spent much on anything, except for the house never borrowed a dime from others, don't eat out and drink Mochas every day,....still kind of live that way, my wife bought her car 12 years ago and is still using it, she walks to work every day as well.

 

I believe that a happy life is a balancing act. Relationships, health (climbing), and money (job/savings) all need to be cautiously looked at and always balanced.

 

Good luck with it Rudy!

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Yup, I took 6 months off to travel in 2004...

So you're turing in your lurker status now? :laf:

You've been "quiet" for almost two years now, and this thread brings you out of "retirement." Boston, eh?

Nice to hear from you again!

 

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Right now is not the time to jeopardize your job. When you are ready to come back, the market may not be very welcoming.

Funny you should say that A...that is one of the things keeping me from squeezing the trigger...the other one is this damn "guilt" shit...everytime i get serious about it, i read about food shortages, talk to a bum, blah blah blah...

 

seriously, my company would take me back...its an awesome company, my fellow staff absolutely rock, my boss is really solid and respectable, the projects are world class...i'm just siiiiiick of it...i feel so bad about not liking it anymore...

 

this is why i haven't bothered to look at other firms...i don't think i can beat this one...or my job...i just don't want do it anymore...

From the bold text, I'd say your decision is pretty clear, and mentally you've already made it. Good luck in your travels! Let us know what you're doing.

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CBS brought this thread to my attention and suggested I weigh in.

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Ah! Well, welcome back. Do stay around awhile, eh? We miss you.

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This hasn't been brought up yet, probably because it's not feasible...but just in case.

 

It sounds like your job is very demanding and you go more by "getting it done" instead of putting in the hours, but is there any way that you could work out some way to contract taking off just like one day a week? That would give you an extra day to hang with your kids and family and just generally destress. Anyway, probably is not feasible because I remember posts lately where you are even being forced to work on weekends. But maybe at least worth typing this out.

 

And what about just scheduling a two-week vacation? Can they keep you from doing that? That might remove you from your current stress box and let you more carefully contemplate this big move.

 

 

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I took six months off in 1995 to backpack around Europe, was laid off upon my return and got a better job in a better location for more pay. Worked there for five years, then quit and took an 18-month road trip to climb, came back and they hired me back. I made slightly less money at first but they let me work four days a week, gave me my seniority back so I get four weeks of vacation, and let me take ridiculous amounts of time off without pay, which I care about a lot more than I care about money. I have no debt or dependents though.

 

 

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This hasn't been brought up yet, probably because it's not feasible...but just in case.

 

It sounds like your job is very demanding and you go more by "getting it done" instead of putting in the hours, but is there any way that you could work out some way to contract taking off just like one day a week? That would give you an extra day to hang with your kids and family and just generally destress. Anyway, probably is not feasible because I remember posts lately where you are even being forced to work on weekends. But maybe at least worth typing this out.

 

And what about just scheduling a two-week vacation? Can they keep you from doing that? That might remove you from your current stress box and let you more carefully contemplate this big move.

 

 

Another option: talk to your boss and tell him/her that the overtime is killing you and you are burning out. Arrange a deal where you will absolutely not work more than 45 hours a week until you are feeling back on an even keel, and then only work more on *rare* occasions (preferably with comp time afterwards).

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