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Explorer

best of cc.com I made an amazing geologic discovery!

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a small cave with petrified logs hanging from the ceiling, etc.

 

I DROPPED SOME LOGS OFF WITH YOUR MOM THIS MORNING

NOT PETRIFIED YET THOUGH

 

G-spotter, Here are two photos that I took of petrified logs hanging from the roof of a cave here in the Oregon Cascades less than two hours from Portland. I took these photos with a film camera, long before digital cameras were on the market. I still have the original 35mm slides, but today I used a digital camera to take photos of the 8”x10” prints that I have of the petrified cave logs.

 

The first photo shows a petrified log hanging from the roof of the cave. It is approximately 14” diameter and 18” long.

 

Petrified_log_1.JPG

This photo shows a smaller and shorter petrified log (in the same cave). A Townsends big eared bat is hanging off the end of this petrified log.

 

Petrified_log_2.JPG[/url

 

]

 

Petrified logs hanging from the roof a cave is a rare thing. A geologist co-worker studied the cave. Her explanation was that thousands of years ago, a mud flow buried some standing trees, leaving them in their upright position. Then many years later molten basalt flowed over the earlier mud flow. Eventually the old mud flow under the basalt eroded out, forming the cave. The exposed petrified logs now hanging from the ceiling of the cave were in the old mud flow that eroded away.

 

As I said before, I understand the skepticism about my new discovery, and I expected some flaming. But I am beginning to think that posting anything about my find on this site was a mistake. My best approach might be to contact Oregon Field Guide, or some outdoor related magazines, one at a time until I find one that will be interested in covering the story. The only reason that I posted this story in the first place was that I was hoping that someone could recommend a good regional outdoor related, or climbing related magazine that would be a good place to share the discovery with the public.

 

Edited by Explorer

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But I am beginning to think that posting anything about my find on this site was a mistake.

 

No kidding, with the recalcitrant hive mind around this place, it is a wonder anyone posts anything.

Sad.

Best of luck and glad you have stoke......maybe that is the cause of all the hating? Lack of passion and stoke by the others? Who knows but yeah, flee this cesspool.

 

:noway:

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Well as much as you're excited about your discovery, if it is truly amazing then it will stand out on its own merits.

 

This is pretty much the key serious point. If it's a great discovery folks will be knocking on your door no matter where you post or print your findings.

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:lmao:

 

So now Mr. Explorer is the victim?

 

We were supposed to provide constructive feedback with zero details on this "amazing geologic discovery"?

 

Contact National Geographic, go back to fighting fires, and wake us all up when you've gone live with something substantive.

 

 

 

 

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OFG would be a good sounding board for you. I wouldn't wait until November. If you have pics then give them to them now and forget about it for the summer. Let them look them over and if they're interested they'll get on it and do a first class job of presenting it, as they did the ice caves on the Sandy Glacier. If they aren't interested then next November you can prepare a presentation yourself for another venue.

 

Also, I wouldn't abandon this board as there are many helpful folks and lots of useful information here. Just ignore the noise that seems to rise to the top.

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i am ted turner and rupert murdoch's love child. PM me the details right now and it will be on the AM news shows coast to coast tomorrow morning.

 

seriously amigo, you apparently already know of Oregon Field Guide, Backpacker Magazine, and the Mazamas. http://mazamas.org/about-us/contact-us/

 

http://www.opb.org/about/contactus/newsroom/

 

<--here is your starting point. They'd be a great org to get in touch with. You're hoping one of us on a lark has Gary E. Knell on speed dial? Sorry but the number of cranks who've popped on here for a minute, a day, a week.. to talk about their epic e-mountaineering plans or epic experience and then are never heard from again.

 

The cave is cool. I'm sure you found something cool out there. No need for all the backstory and buts/coulds/whens, if it is as impressive as you say, it will get a feature like the sandy glacier ice caves or more. it doesn't matter one iota if it is first revealed in a forum like this or the cover of nat geo--if it is worthy on its own it'll get all the attention it needs.

 

good luck, you're highly unlikely to get anything more than the same loop of suggestion. Unless you're going to post more actual info you'll probably feel antagonized if you keep coming here and replying, not to discourage you from enjoying this fine website.. (but it sounds like you have a very busy summer ahead of you). I'll be stoked when I actually learn about what it is you found. I'm stoked when someone posts a TR, not when someone asks for beta or tells of how they plan to do something impressive.

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i make an amazing geologic discovery every morning upon awakening :)

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i am ted turner and rupert murdoch's love child. PM me the details right now and it will be on the AM news shows coast to coast tomorrow morning.

 

seriously amigo, you apparently already know of Oregon Field Guide, Backpacker Magazine, and the Mazamas. http://mazamas.org/about-us/contact-us/

 

http://www.opb.org/about/contactus/newsroom/

 

<--here is your starting point. They'd be a great org to get in touch with. You're hoping one of us on a lark has Gary E. Knell on speed dial? Sorry but the number of cranks who've popped on here for a minute, a day, a week.. to talk about their epic e-mountaineering plans or epic experience and then are never heard from again.

 

The cave is cool. I'm sure you found something cool out there. No need for all the backstory and buts/coulds/whens, if it is as impressive as you say, it will get a feature like the sandy glacier ice caves or more. it doesn't matter one iota if it is first revealed in a forum like this or the cover of nat geo--if it is worthy on its own it'll get all the attention it needs.

 

good luck, you're highly unlikely to get anything more than the same loop of suggestion. Unless you're going to post more actual info you'll probably feel antagonized if you keep coming here and replying, not to discourage you from enjoying this fine website.. (but it sounds like you have a very busy summer ahead of you). I'll be stoked when I actually learn about what it is you found. I'm stoked when someone posts a TR, not when someone asks for beta or tells of how they plan to do something impressive.

 

Exactly what I was trying to say. +1

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That read like a Nigerian email. Are they doing Mad-Libs now where you can customize the topic?

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http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=45503

 

I'm guessing he was on the Scott mountain fire and the "discovery" was in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area.

 

There's lots of volcanic activity in that area and a bunch of pot farms....So i'm not sure what he found...

 

However, the stunning site that I discovered is not only rare in the northwest; it is also more spectacular than the other similar known geologic features in Oregon.

 

Without giving up the location why don't you say what type of feature you found? Sounds like it's guarded by a grueling 7 mile hike.

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Fun mystery.

 

Since it was spotted from the air while flying down a drainage yet exploration was stopped by cliffs i'm guessing slot canyon/rift. Maybe another crack-in-the-ground, oregon hell hole or a cool slot in the Owyhee Canyonlands/lesley gulch or Hells Canyon area?

 

I guess a cave seems less likely to be spottable from the air, the description doesn't match a spire or summit. It could be a painted desert/bad lands like in the John Day area but that seems less exciting and you said you were forest service not BLM.

 

Be aware that some spots are known but kept off maps for public safety or because the locals never felt they were overly significant or didn't' want to attract tourists, rock hounds etc. Since you're FS i'd reach out to the local rangers and see what they know.

 

Honestly publishing a great trip report on a blog or forum like this is probably the best way to build interest, loads of stories start out viral and jump to the mainstream media. Any major show or publication is going to require a repeat visit for video and/or higher quality photos.

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Explorer-

What's your motivation for sharing your discovery and what sort of feature are we talking about?

 

Do you want fame fortune and women? I doubt you'll get it but if that's what you're after then you'll probably want to find a lawyer and a publicist. Maybe an editor to help with a book deal.

 

If you want to establish some sort of protection for this newly discovered feature then you should probably contact someone like the Access Fund or the conservation committee of the Mountaineers.

 

If you just want to share your discovery with other people that will appreciate it then there isn't really a need to wait, just put up some pictures and lat/long and someone will go look at it.

 

What are we talking about? Is it some 4000 foot vertical wall that's never been climbed or is there a mineral of economic value?

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Explorer - I actually think you have gotten some fun and interesting advice so far. But you really need to contact FS, BLM, USGS and see who's in charge of that area ( especially if you are already involved with the FS) - also chat with some Oregon Mountaineer's that understand the local rules regarding new trails forming in a wilderness area, as well as the NO bolts issue. Others on this site have been down that path before and rather than a hero, you will end up a bum if you don't follow such bureaucracy rules. If you have made a cool discovery in an unknown area, then good for you and good luck.

 

:tup:

 

 

 

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I bet he saw Stein's pillar.

 

Doesn't match his description of the difficult access etc.

 

I'm guessing the poster was just a troll with too much time on his hands.

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