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Dru

Lib Ridge Accident Statistics

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classic snaffle accident snaf.gif

 

but a classic can be hard too dp.

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About accidents on Liberty Ridge....

 

For some reason I have the perception that a lot of accidents come from people who do not live in the northwest.

 

It's as if they take vacation, go to climb Liberty Ridge, and becuase of the limited time off, cannot wait for a weather window.

 

Just a perception.

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Agreed, but nw clibmers probably have the same shit happen to them when they climb in alaska, nepal, bolivia, etc., etc.

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I disagree Ivan. Those destinations often require a time committment that allows for greater flexibility. For example, you can summit Denali in less than two weeks if you are lucky with weather etc but most climbers budget a month or so. Same for Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia.

 

Liberty Ridge, because of its proximity to a major metropolitan area, can be climbed in a long weekend if the weather cooperates. Which also explains why Hood and Fuji are climbed in such droves.

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most dangerous activities in ref of percentage of accidents are from greatest to least.

EOD (explosive ordnance disposal although not recreational just thought I would thought that in there)

SCUBA diving when diving below 151 FT

Para gliding

Hang gliding

Navy Pilot (landing on carriers)

Bungee jumping (for competition why that makes a difference I have no idea)

Student pilot then fighter followed by helicopter

Sky diving (HALO or HAHO) not static line

I realize that a navy pilot is not a rec activity considered by some but other would (please no spray)

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but Hood is the most climbed mountain in the US and one of the most climbed mountains in the world (behind Mt. Fuji which has concession stands all the way to the top).

Elaborate! hellno3d.gif

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but Hood is the most climbed mountain in the US and one of the most climbed mountains in the world (behind Mt. Fuji which has concession stands all the way to the top).

Elaborate! hellno3d.gif

Bloody hell! hellno3d.gif Look at what I found on Google! I thought Rainier was crowded!

 

fuji-021.jpg

 

You got 10 year olds and 60 year olds summiting this 12000ft mountain!

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but a classic can be hard too dp.

 

But a hard route isn't neccessarily "classic" either. I think some routes in "classic" books are more dangling carrots!

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I disagree Ivan. Those destinations often require a time committment that allows for greater flexibility. For example, you can summit Denali in less than two weeks if you are lucky with weather etc but most climbers budget a month or so. Same for Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia.

 

even then there is still the temptation to get something in return for the time and money invested even if conditions are not quite right.

 

the canadian rockies are a place where nw climbers tend to get in trouble because of time constraint. which when combined with the fact that alpine climbing in the rockies is also more hazardous than cascade climbing, makes it a very significant hazard.

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Skyclimb: For a sport to be a sport the possibility of death is considerable if not imminent tongue.gif.

So, baseball, football, etc, aren't sports? Hmm. Better e-mail "Sports Illustrated."

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leaning in on a randy johnson fastball would def be ill advised...standing up in front of emmitt smith about the same

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Take a look at Mount Washington in NH. It has a dangerous label attached to it solely because it is in such close proximity to a pool of 100 million accidents waiting to happen. How many times have we heard stories about a couple of Bubbas who drive up from Jersey for an outdoor weekend and then find themselves in way over their heads (once the cell phone batteries run out). Sure, they get some cold, windy and snowy days with an avalanche hazard, but in no way is it more dangerous than any of the cascades.

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Uhm...You ever been on that thing? Do you what kinda winds they get on that thing? Usually has stronger winds than on Everest. You bet taht will complicate matters.

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I think Hummingbird Ridge is in 50 Crowded because Allen Steck was on the first ascent, same reason guidebook author's routes sometimes get more stars than they deserve. It's not that they're out for shameless self promotion, its just that their personal emotional attachment can make the route more notable or enjoyable than someone else might find it.

 

The crowd photo of Fuji reminded me of Popo in Mexico. You could (back when it wasn't erupting) be slogging along the dog route at 15,000' and have little kids in sandals trying to sell you gum. Locals would do the route in soccer cleats instead of crampons, and I saw one guy with home made crampons welded up out of rebar. Yeah, they had a lot of accidents there too.

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Uhm...You ever been on that thing? Do you what kinda winds they get on that thing? Usually has stronger winds than on Everest. You bet taht will complicate matters.

 

Bull, have you been on Everest? The worst winds on Mt Washington are not even comparable to those on an 8000 meter peak. No body climbs, or can climb, a big mountain off season with bad weather. Hell nobody knows how high the winds can get at their worst, at the worst time of year. But we are certainly talking well over a thousand miles per hour. Can you say jet stream? the_finger.gif

 

Just because a bump like Mt Washington is easily accessable anytime of year and has a weather station on top; it doesn't mean shit when you get reading above 200 mph. Don't stroke your ego in public by implying that Mt. washington is an accomplishment; especially on a thread talking about experienced climbers dieing. wazzup.gif

 

I agree with RBW above. I think though that the crux of the subject here is this... I can't site references; but I am sure that the standard (dog) routes on almost all mountains, not only have a higher fatality rate but a higher PERCENTAGE fatality rate. That is simply because those routes attract the climbers with the least experience. I expect a corrolary statistic could be found with wildly popular simi-technical routes like Lib Ridge.

 

I think that any climb outside of ones own area has the potential to affect one's judgment. There is often more goal orientation, and therfore more potential to push harder than might be prudent.

 

IMO

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Whoa there TG, the jet stream only averages around 50 knots, or around 60mph, and can go up to 230 knots or around 250 mph.

 

that's still pretty strong though, and does not ever reach "thousands" of miles per hour...

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Hey Terminal,did I say it was more dangerous? No.I said it wasn't an objective free climb. The current world record holder for wind speed at 231 MPH is washington. Actually the winds are stronger on washington than on everest. At least that is what I learned in my Geography class. Look it up if you don't believe me.

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Uhm...You ever been on that thing? Do you what kinda winds they get on that thing? Usually has stronger winds than on Everest. You bet that will complicate matters.

 

Mt Washington has the highest ever "measured" wind speed. That is because they have a weather station on top, and yes, I have been there. I bet there are much higher wind speeds where there aren't weather stations. We don't make a big deal about our cars making it to Timberline Lodge, even though it is similar to driving up Mount washington. Mount Washington also has warning signs about dangerous weather conditions. Ranier had a similar sign until it was destroyed by the weather.

 

That being said, I still believe the danger of Mount Washington is overrated because of its proximity to large crowds of city people who have no understanding or appreciation of the danger of the outdoors. Poor preparation and training have more to do with accidents there than the objective hazards.

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Skyclimb: For a sport to be a sport the possibility of death is considerable if not imminent tongue.gif.

So, baseball, football, etc, aren't sports? Hmm. Better e-mail "Sports Illustrated."

 

Insert Hemmingway quote here:

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Whoa there TG, the jet stream only averages around 50 knots, or around 60mph, and can go up to 230 knots or around 250 mph.

 

that's still pretty strong though, and does not ever reach "thousands" of miles per hour...

 

My bad, sorry.

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Skyclimb: For a sport to be a sport the possibility of death is considerable if not imminent tongue.gif.

So, baseball, football, etc, aren't sports? Hmm. Better e-mail "Sports Illustrated."

 

Insert Hemmingway quote here:

 

Tee Hee... fruit.gif

 

"There are only three sports: bullfighting, motor-racing and mountaineering; all the rest are merely games." - Ernest Hemingway wazzup.gif

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I don't think one mountain is necessarily any more "dangerous" than another. What is dangerous is how PEOPLE act on them. Mt Washington could possibly have more deaths than Rainier; I'll bet it is close. Therefore statistically it is more dangerous. What makes it more dangerous is that so many people underestimate it's conditions. It looks like a mere bump, but it has all the conditions of much larger mountains. People head up on sunny august days never thinking it can be severe weather(high winds, freezing temps, whiteout) above timberline at a mere 4200 ft. Ironically, Mt. Washington has more posted warning signs than most mountains. People just don't take them seriously. Most deaths are not to climbers, but to hikers. Climber deaths are probably mostly in avalanches. On the east coast, avalanche awareness is not as prevalent.

 

Many deaths in the mountains are more from of a calvacade of bad decisions than a single incident. Those kinds of deaths can not be attributed to the mountain being dangerous, but people being dangerous.

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Mountains don't kill people. People kill people.

Sorry. Couldn't resist.

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What if they are having the most fun and therefore are the best climbers?

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