Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
ChrisL

Looking for a guide up Mt Rainier

Recommended Posts

A friend and I were planning on going up Mt rainier with RMI, and doing their expedition style seminar. We've heard a lot of mixed opinions on them though. All the other companies I have found are completely booked for this year, so I thought this may be the next best thing.

 

Were possibly looking for a local to take us up the mountain. Both of us have limited summer rock climbing experience, but no kind of winter experience whatsoever. We would be looking for someone to do something similiar to the rmi expedition seminar for us. Spend a few days teaching us as much as possible, and then spend a few days going up the mountain. We are both mature college students, no drinking or drugs (believe it or not) both in good condition, and plan to do nothing but get in even better condition in the mean time.

 

If anyone has any opinions on RMI, I'd like to hear them if possible. Or if you'd like to offer your services to us, pm me some details about your climbing experience and a cost of course.

 

Thanks!

Chris.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was unaware of that.

So I guess we are only looking for a guide with a permit!

 

Which ultimately means RMI or one of the other guide services that work on the Emmons like American Alpine Institute, Alpine Ascents International, Cascade Alpine Guides, or Rainier Alpine Guides.

 

Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gas grass or ass: nobody rides for free.

 

i suggest walking up a better mountain. rainier is just an advertisng icon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are no laws prohibiting you from going up with a new friend and paying for the gas, the permit fees, the food, maybe some new gear and then buying said new friend dinner afterward. I'm always looking for new friends, catch my drift? Wink, wink.

 

I have a buddy who guides for RMI, and I would recommend him to anybody. He is a great guy and takes his job very seriously. If the other RMI guides are anything like him, RMI would be a fine choice.

 

Jason, Your dad is giving a talk where I work in a couple of weeks. One of my colleagues has known him since the 70's. I am looking forward to it.

Edited by danielpatricksmith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do the south ridge of Adams without a guide. No crevasses or big dangers except falling climbers. It will give you a chance to use crampons,ice axe, camp in snow etc. Then post on this board in the partner's forum or the Rainier forum. I might be going up in late June or mid July. I already have three trips planned this spring and no room on any of them for another climber.

I am not a guide and do not charge. Just get some basic mountaineering experience and there are a few people who would go with you.

Otherwise, I have always heard good things about RMI. All guide services have problems. RMI is no exception but seems to do all right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do the Emmons with American Alpine Institute

Stay away from the cleaver, unless you can go early and do the Ingraham Direct. .02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) Do what Bug says.

2) Take Crevasse Resque class by RMI thumbs_up.gif This would be few times cheaper and will give you the exact skills you want (but hopefully will not need on the summit day).

3) Go Emmons. No rockfall. Fri/Sat. There will be crowd but it will be less than Sat/Sun.

 

This plan brought me to the summit year ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only 2 so so far, and no real responses back yet frown.gif

If someone wants to take us up for free, I'm more than willing to pay for all costs, gas, and some new equipment for you like many have suggested smile.gif

 

I'm also open to other mountain suggestions, it dosen't have to be rainier. We would like to try some ice climbing before we leave too if at all possible.

Edited by ChrisL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young Master Chris:

I would encourage you and your friend to think about what you want. If your goals are simply to summit Rainier, then a guided climb (either professional or some other arrangement) will get you there. A lot of people do this. The photos look good on their desks when there are interviewing their next Personal Injury case or Psoriasis patient, and then these people move on to something else (maybe a marathon, maybe a trip to Costa Rica- “its all good”). Be warned, however, that this path comes from the dark side. If you choose it, most people on this board will probably treat you like a used blue bag.

If, on the other hand, your goals are to become climbers, you will probably find many people willing to share their experience and knowledge. If this is what you want, I suggest these steps to get started.

1. Knowledge. You are going to need some basic knowledge in a variety of disciplines; weather, avalanche, glacier formation, hypothermia, etc. If you haven’t already done so, read Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills, cover-to-cover. Some of the stuff you will already know from rock climbing, some will be obvious, but some of it will be useful, and you won’t find a better general introduction. Lots of places to go for more knowledge after that, but start with this book. If you really learn it you will know more than most people who buy climbing helmets.

2. Skills. You will need practice to translate the book knowledge into useable skills, as well as to start picking up a lot of the little things that books can’t teach. Many of the skills you will want to practice can be figured out by the two of you without assistance. Map reading, compass work, freezing your ass in a bivy sack in howling wind (but surviving), etc., you can do on your own. Posting on this board, requesting assistance with specific skills, will probably be fruitful. (e.g.: “want help with ice axe arrest and setting running belays”, or “can someone show us how to dig a snow cave?”)

3. Partners. A lot of climbing, and skills practice, can be done solo. But much of it takes a team of two or three. Finding a group of people with similar interests and abilities, and who you want to hang out with, can be one of the hardest parts of climbing. Finding people with more experience, who will take the time to teach you instead of actually having fun climbing, can be even harder.

Local mountaineering clubs can help you in all three of areas. Look for one at your, or a nearby, university, or community. (You may find the smaller clubs easier to take, unless your current status as a college student has built up your tolerance level for bureaucracy.) Most clubs offer mountaineering classes in addition to opportunities to meet other people with varied experience levels.

Let me know if you are interested in doing some skills practice sessions on Mt Hood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All great points Ovr40 but I think this guy already went to IKEA and bought his nice tasteful wooden frame for his 8x10 glossy... rolleyes.gif

 

ChrisL... anyone who takes you,a total newbie, up Rainier for some free waffles ISN'T someone you want guiding you up that mtn. thumbs_down.gif Anyone with the skills and judgement to guide Rainier will be running away from you so god damn fast your head will spin until you've got the skills. Sooo...Get or buy some real experience and then ,maybe, you'll understand what I mean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
All great points Ovr40 but I think this guy already went to IKEA and bought his nice tasteful wooden frame for his 8x10 glossy... rolleyes.gif

 

ChrisL... anyone who takes you,a total newbie, up Rainier for some free waffles ISN'T someone you want guiding you up that mtn. thumbs_down.gif Anyone with the skills and judgement to guide Rainier will be running away from you so god damn fast your head will spin until you've got the skills. Sooo...Get or buy some real experience and then ,maybe, you'll understand what I mean.

 

I call bullshit. Many of those with the skills and judgement to guide Rainier would be able to guide someone who has never stepped foot on snow up to the top given a day or two of snow skills training beforehand. Guide services do it all the time. Do you think those prerequisites that guide services list on their websites are set in stone? I used to work for a [reputable] NW guiding service and it was common practice to guide fat guys with a lot of money to the top of Cascade Volcanoes. I guided more than one person up Baker who had never even seen snow before or held an ice axe in hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, go for it, dude. Take him up. When you take a plunge into crevasse and your shitbrick newbie partners can't remember how to get you out then you'll be thinking different.

 

When you were guiding ,I would imagine there were other guides on these climbs, as well? That makes a big difference...that's plain reckless otherwise. But then Mountain Madness was pretty reputable too til they got a bunch of people killed on some big famous peak in the Hima. rolleyes.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I was with other guides. And I agree it wouldn't be smart for one experienced climber to guide an inexperienced climber up anything that requires glacier travel. But your post made it sound like ChrisL was asking for the impossible, and I was just stating that there are options even in this case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not asking for the impossible, and this is definatly not going to be a 1 time thing. Also like I said, I am open to other mountains to learn things on.

 

Oh and that book is allready on order from amazon smile.gif

Edited by ChrisL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey, i am getting in shape for a trip to denali this june and will be heading up rainier many times, havent actually climbed it before but could take you and your friend up it and show you the ropes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right on man. If youa re willing to put in the time, you will be able to climb ranier with relative safety. I would just suggest you do practice various rescue techniques both at home and on a glacier before venturing up to 14,000 to see if you can do it. wink.gif Good luck and post any questions you have. thumbs_up.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, go for it, dude. Take him up. When you take a plunge into crevasse and your shitbrick newbie partners can't remember how to get you out then you'll be thinking different.

 

When you were guiding ,I would imagine there were other guides on these climbs, as well? That makes a big difference...that's plain reckless otherwise. But then Mountain Madness was pretty reputable too til they got a bunch of people killed on some big famous peak in the Hima. rolleyes.gif

 

Hmmm. Why not be a bit more brash? He's simply asking for opinions on guides. The key word here is GUIDE, which implicates the fact that you'll have to show this "shitbrick newbie" a thing or two, which there's nothing wrong with. Everyone had to start somewhere, even you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No doubt. If I am with a competent partner, I have no quams taking a newbie up. I would obviously (and have) conducted a day's crevasse rescue/ glacier travel workshop prior/during, but if the student is motivated, it is a real gas to see them stoked and hooked after seeing the top of a big peak. Cut the dood some slack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Advertising icon? I like Mt. R. I don't care who climbs it either, and I understand wanting to climb it. If I had not grown up looking at the Brothers I probably would have climbed Rainier first. Some people don't care about how they are viewed upon from snob climbers-they just want the individual goal!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×