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Allenkoe

Looking for private guide for rainier

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Hello my name is Allen I'm looking for a private guide that either has great résumé or is amga cert. I need to fine tune a few skills and doing these big group climbs with rmi dosnt seem that appealing. Email ASAP as I would like to try and do this sometime after my AIARE 1 class in February.

 

Allenkoe911@gmail.com

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you will need to go through a licensed outfit for rainier. There are very good companies that have a license for rainier. alpine ascents and IMG have very good guides but may not be amga cert.

your timing is going to be hard though. Most outfits do their trips in the summer so staffing a winter trip may be difficult. Seem to remember that the AMGA had a limited number of days for certified guides not in a licensed company. Check out their website if the regular companies won't fulfill your needs.

 

A guide needs a guiding permit to work in rainier. Without it, is illegal, does guiding a disservice and looks poorly in the eyes of the NPS.

 

I doubt that my rant will change anyones opinions though. You sound like you are determined to do it no matter the cost. (mostly from the ASAP comment) Maybe i am wrong. hard to really read people in the internet. :)

Edited by genepires

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I may have worded that wrong I can wait alittle till prime climbing season is in swing. I just returned from a trip jan 6th a winter expedition seminar. It was more like a tourist attraction there was like 13 others on the trip all of witch were at least in there forties and most likely going through a mid life crises. I was amazed that out of everyone NO ONE besides myself and the guides knew how to tie in to a rope. Not a vary good experience, my five year old daughter is more educated in the mountains then these guys were, so I'm looking for someone that has a good bit of experience on rainier and maby I could make a donation do some new equipment .

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Sounds like you had a terrible time on that trip...

 

The only operations that have permits to guide on Rainier are:

Rainier mountaineering Inc.,

international Mountain Guides,

Alpine Ascents International

 

Your best option is to contact them and explain what you're looking for, as well as the terrible experience you had on the previous trip. They should have some options for you.

 

It's unlikely you'll find a guide who has a relationship with any of these companies (so they can guide on the companies' permits) and the experience you want without contacting the companies directly.

 

Good luck!

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The authorized guides for Rainier have likely summitted dozens or maybe hundreds of times and can tie knots in their sleep and will keep you safe. You have been around the wrong people.

Edited by matt_warfield

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The authorized guides for Rainier have likely summitted dozens or maybe hundreds of times and can tie knots in their sleep and will keep you safe. You have been around the wrong people.

 

Guided climbers have died on Rainier and I've had poor experiences with guides on the mountain. These are not, perhaps, likely things, but they are not out of the question, either.

 

For my first Rainier climb in 1995 we used a non-sanctioned guide. For us it was the best choice for reasons of cost and personalized experience.

 

The situation has changed in the intervening years, as the park now nets a huge amount of cash from the guide contracts (the park Sup. solely sets the fee and the percentage that the park keeps) and uses this cash to subsidize other things all over the park (the new visitor center at Paradise and the park radio network to name two). Park management has become much more protective of the sanctioned companies in order to protect their money pile. When massive floods closed the park for months a few years back, they let the guide services use the back entrance to Longmire to get paying clients onto the mountain, while the park remained closed to the public. They went out of their way to keep this information from the public as well.

 

I'm not saying the arrangement is all bad, just that it isn't altruistically setup to provide the best possible situation for guided climbers.

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I agree with almost everything you said. It is not a free market system at all and other Parks are similar. Ironic that National Parks are there to mostly provide free access to fantastic places and then set up a closed up guide system.

 

But if you can afford it, most guides will get you up and down more safely than your friends will.

Edited by matt_warfield

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I think your best bet would be to just find the right people on here that know what they're doing that will take the time to help you learn and be a better climber.

 

Guides are great but they are a huge crutch as well because they do everything for you such as break step, boil water and tuck you into bed in a way!

 

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I know the perfect person for your request. I have contacted him to check if he´s available, and if he minds me giving you his details. I´ll get back to you asap if he has an opening.

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Check out www.mountaingurus.com Dennis is a great guy and has permit to guide on Ranier. Sadly only 5% of remaining permits goes to the little guys.

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Have given him your contact details so he can contact you directly. Hope it works out.

Ralph

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I didn't know that about the guides. I know RMI has left people on the mountain in a sleeping bag while the healthy climbers went to the summit. I'm not using a guide service. IMG may be the only one I'd use on a big expedition. RMI says its a "4 day summit climb" when really it's just a two day

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I didn't know that about the guides. I know RMI has left people on the mountain in a sleeping bag while the healthy climbers went to the summit. I'm not using a guide service. IMG may be the only one I'd use on a big expedition. RMI says its a "4 day summit climb" when really it's just a two day

 

Ok, lets keep some of the disinformation to a minimum.

 

RMI no longer bivies clients who can't make it on a sleeping bag. This process stopped years ago. I'm not condoning the activity but I have climbed on some of these climbs and a client who could not make it sure enjoyed the sunrise in their sleeping bag. Warm and a great view of the east usually.

 

That being said, its a practice they had to stop once the 3 concessionaires were announced.

 

The guide services on Rainier have no idea what they are getting when people throw money at them. They have stretched out the climb into multiple days in order to confirm that the clients have the skills and good acclimatization to get up the mountain. They are hauling clients and not really teaching. 4 day = 1 day to muir, 1 day of snow school, acclimatization, 1 day to summit, 1 day down. Considering they get all kinds of people, this is very reasonable for a beginner in my opinion.

 

Finally, I hope you have an idea of what kind of risk you're putting this "independent guide" in.... If they are caught guiding without a concession or permit in MRNP (and you can bet your ass that MRNP personnel read this forum), they will be banned from the park permanently. That's pretty damn harsh. I wouldn't want to be the "client" who screwed a potential young guide out of an opportunity to guide for a concessionaire because I got him kicked out of the park.

 

Why don't you get some basic skills, find a partner and just have a go at it?

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I'm not using a guide service.

 

If you're not using a guide service, then you are asking to be guided illegally.

 

Although many of us (both guides and the guided public) would love to see the guiding regulations amended in our National Parks to allow for independent access for AMGA and IFMGA certified guides, that is no reason to circumvent the system. Any illegal guiding in the park is just that--illegal. Not to mention the probable lack of insurance and formal guide education of the illegal guide.

 

My recommendation would be to hire a legally permitted guide to teach you the skills you want/need to climb Mount Rainier, but do so on another mountain (such as Baker, Adams, etc). There are many more legal options for this type climbing instruction. Afterwards, you could attempt to climb with friends you meet on CC.com independently and legally.

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Seems like if many would love the see the current system changed, there might be at least one reason to circumvent it.

 

Just sayin.

 

 

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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There are three guide service concessionaires and 12 (I believe) annual single-trip permit holders. The single trip companies, such as Pro Guiding Service, typically operate at smaller ratios and can offer you the personalized trip you want. Start looking now - the Park Service should be able to tell you who those companies are.

 

Another possibility is to join one of a number of climbing clubs, many of whom finish their basic climbing class with an ascent of Rainier.

 

Its hard not to be insulted when asked to pirate guide, since money is usually the first reason people look outside of the concession guide services. I understand, but I also am trying to make a living here, and as an AMGA certified and IFMGA licensed guide, I can't afford the consequences of being caught operating without proper permitting. It would destroy my reputation with land managers and give guide services good reason not to hire me as well, since what guide service would want to admit to land managers that they employ a known pirate guide?

 

That's the risk the OP is asking an AMGA certified guide to take by pirate guiding.

 

Tvash, believe me, we're working on it. Its a whole other topic and I don't want to hijack the thread. Feel free to PM me with follow-ups.

Edited by chris

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Oh, I have no problem with the current system or any other - just takin the piss.

 

Guide on!

 

Every 3 years or so I take a fresh crop of noobs up - friends, family, neighbors, 1st Ave bums, etc. Our number one nemesis: REI's Blue Boots of Pain.

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...IMG may be the only one I'd use on a big expedition....

 

I used them last summer, and can't say enough good about all 4 guides, and the service. It was apparent to me early on that they knew what they were doing, and they conveyed it to a bunch of "unknown" noobs quite well, so that we (at least I) knew what we were expected to do, and how, and why.

 

If you want to make it right at least for the first time, spend the $1300 and go with them. They make it into a 3 day trip (vs RMIs 2 days), and your odds of coming back alive are greatly increased by going with someone that knows what they're doing, and has ready access to emergency communications (two-way radio and sat-phone if needed) instead of someone who really would prefer to NOT have anyone know they were up there.

 

That was money WELL spent for my first trip up the mountain. And, I wouldn't hesitate to use them again.

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I think your best bet would be to just find the right people on here that know what they're doing that will take the time to help you learn and be a better climber.

 

The fact that money is involved (~$1000 to get up Rainier) fundamentally corrupts the whole process. Several examples have already been listed. When I first started climbing I paid that kind of money, but honestly I learned more from "Freedom of the Hills" and my first trip up the south side of hood. And that only cost me a couple hundred bucks to buy the gear, which I still have.

 

Guide services are a waste of money. And frankly, as far as I'm concerned, a guided summit doesn't count.

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Everyone is entitled to their own opinion—even your elitist, non-inclusive view of mountaineering.

 

Everyone who wishes to venture into the mountains should be able to, even if they don't possess the requisite skills to complete their journey safely and, thus, desire the company of a certified guide.

 

Go to the mountains and enjoy their good tidings!

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Everyone is entitled to their own opinion—even your elitist, non-inclusive view of mountaineering.

 

Everyone who wishes to venture into the mountains should be able to, even if they don't possess the requisite skills to complete their journey safely and, thus, desire the company of a certified guide.

 

Go to the mountains and enjoy their good tidings!

:tup:

 

Greed/money can, and will continue, to taint any activity but there is nothing wrong with hiring a guide to climb something. No more than it's wrong to go on a guided bike ride, ski trip, garden tour, whatever. That said, I've never done a guided climb but it sure sounds appealing as I get older and look forward to the day I can contract out some of the grunt work and relax as if I was staying at the Taj Majal. Enjoying the journey more because I don't have to be doing all the chores...

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Everyone who wishes to venture into the mountains should be able to, even if they don't possess the requisite skills to complete their journey safely and, thus, desire the company of a certified guide.

 

Go to the mountains and enjoy their good tidings!

 

Hear hear. I have often heard people complain that guided parties were hogging the mountain or that their clients didn't deserve to be there. I think that climbers who may not want to invest a couple of seasons into acquiring knowledge have just as much right to climb Mt. Rainier as I do, and, in my experience, guides generally try NOT to piss off other climbers because they don't want complaints to be sent to the land managers. While guided parties may be larger than private parties or there may be a lot of them, I bet they are easier to be around than the same number of amateurs.

 

I agree with the posts about how guides are given special privileges on Mt. Rainier and I understand the complaints about the concessionaire system, but I think it is a good thing that people can be guided on Mt. Rainier.

 

By the way: I have led climbs were we stashed sick climbers in sleeping bags and picked them up on the way down. All involved thought it was a good solution to a real problem.

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"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion—even your elitist, non-inclusive view of mountaineering.

 

Everyone who wishes to venture into the mountains should be able to, even if they don't possess the requisite skills to complete their journey safely and, thus, desire the company of a certified guide.

 

Go to the mountains and enjoy their good tidings!"

 

So..... should the NPS put wheelchair accessible ascent gullies on every mountain, so lazy overweight walmart powerchair users can also experience the mountains?

 

When I started last year, I assumed that starting small and getting bigger and bigger as my knowledge, fitness, and comfort in the environment went up. I thought the mountains were something to be earned, not something you just throw a check at and get a free ride to the top with..... guess I've been doing it all wrong.

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Everyone who wishes to venture into the mountains should be able to, even if they don't possess the requisite skills to complete their journey safely and, thus, desire the company of a certified guide.

 

This might be the dumbest thing I've ever read on this website.

 

Which guide service do you work for Kurt so we all know which ones are hiring the best and brightest?

 

 

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Everyone who wishes to venture into the mountains should be able to, even if they don't possess the requisite skills to complete their journey safely and, thus, desire the company of a certified guide.

 

This might be the dumbest thing I've ever read on this website.

 

Which guide service do you work for Kurt so we all know which ones are hiring the best and brightest?

 

 

 

Perhaps you can click the link in his signature. It seems you might need a guide to help you along during your journey on the internet. I'm available to help if you'd like, though perhaps you feel that because you don't have the requisite skills in html and css you shouldn't be allowed to use it...

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