Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Blake

Random Tips and Tricks Thread - not spray

Recommended Posts

When forced to stay in a hotel, make us of the complimentary stove.

 

Spring_Break_07_057.jpg

 

That is awesome :tup: :tup: :tup:

 

I've boiled eggs with the in-suite coffee maker. It takes about two hours to get them fully hard-boiled and most coffee makers auto shut off after 1 hour. So be aware you need to cycle the power after and hour.

 

A few boiled eggs plus a bowl of Cheerios and OJ == bfast of champions. (milk and OJ kept cold in the ice bucket, of course)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What happens if you use a prussik cord that is smaller than 2/3 of the main rope? Won't grab?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got 7.5mm rope. I got all concerned about the small-diameter prussik thing and bought 5mm prussik cord (Man that's thin! Not very confidence inspiring).

 

Afterwards, I thought about it and just tried out ascending the rope with 6mm prussiks. Worked just fine for that application.

 

Moral of the story is: It's good to be cautious and listen to doomsayers on the internet, but don't blindly trust them all the time.

 

 

(Hopefully it goes without saying that it's even worse to blindly trust foolish optimists on the internet. If you do decide to take 6mm prussiks and an 8mm rope, then you really should at least try it out in your backyard first before getting to the dangling in a crevasse part.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What happens if you use a prussik cord that is smaller than 2/3 of the main rope? Won't grab?

tried ascending a 8 mm'ish rope w/ my 6 mm'ish prusiks in the dark near the top of the snow creek wall (yummy pressure chamber!) - this produced extreme terror as they didn't grab b/c of my phat ass - they did work if i just increased the # of wraps, but that makes them very difficult to tend to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The more tension on the rope, the less grab the prussicks can acheive. The Prussik knot works best when it can bend the rope a little.

 

Ivan should NOT be prussicking.

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JBo6 -

What chucK, 5K, and ivan said.

 

They might not grab; then increase the wraps. More wraps make it harder to deal with. Try it before you "buy it".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It also depends on the friction knot used. One experiment indicated that the autoblock worked best for most applications.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klemheist, dudez!!!111 easier and quicker to tie whether dangling in a hole or holding the weight of a fallen climber. Prussiks are hard as hell to tie quickly when trying to tie it between and behind your legs. A klemhiest is simple to wrap and clip off.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok, but what kind of real-to-life loads are we talking about here?

 

If we are talking a crevasse rescue situation, you are talking

 

A: body weight, if part of self rescue

 

or

 

B: a load of maybe 1000 pounds in a hauling system (3:1, 5:1)

 

AND, I'm thinking of two person glacial travel.

I've practiced it enough to find the klemheist significantly easier to tie when looking under your legs, as your thighs burn with the urge to rip you out of your stance. I've never had it slip.

 

How is it that the autoblock came out on top as the friction hitch with the greatest holding power?

 

Can I see the study you mentioned?

 

Also, I'm not trying to fight or flame, I'm just curious!

 

EDIT: this is also considering that you don't travel with a rescue hitch already attached to the rope. If that is the case, then a klemheist is not optimal hitch, as it is omnidirectional, where the prussik is multidirectional. Then you can belay your partners in/out as needed.

Edited by Kraken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But traveling with people that think EVERYTHING they have is a fucking "carry-on," this inconveniences and endangers everyone else on the plane. :fahq:

 

If you are flying overseas (esp. to/from Australasia & Europe) don't fucking try the dumbass american massive carryon. They'll inspect it and make you check it one way or another and then you are fucked.

 

Learn to travel light. It doesn't take many $25-$100 overweight bag fees for things to add up.

 

Learn to budget for the total trip. How much will the flight cost? Your luggage? Transport?

 

The last airline I flew with, air new zealand, had a weight limit for carry-on as well as the checked baggage. Pacific Blue and the others that fly to Australia have a similar policy.

 

On the way home I'm planning on wearing my boots and a couple of extra layers. Will make for an uncomfortable flight but I figure it's probably worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If taking dehydrated meals, I like to cut open the packages before a trip and seal them in a smaller, more compressible, plastic bag. I keep the small instruction sheet to know how much water to add and for how long. This way things pack up much smaller, and with less weight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On the way home I'm planning on wearing my boots and a couple of extra layers. Will make for an uncomfortable flight but I figure it's probably worth it.

 

Ship it to yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey moderators,

 

How about a new Forum on "Tips and Tricks"? This single post clearly has a lot of interest. We climbers have lot of tips to share. There are a few gems in this post, but they are buried under all the others. Good tips would be easier too find if they were seperated more by topic, in a separate forum.

 

Whaddya say?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But traveling with people that think EVERYTHING they have is a fucking "carry-on," this inconveniences and endangers everyone else on the plane. :fahq:

 

If you are flying overseas (esp. to/from Australasia & Europe) don't fucking try the dumbass american massive carryon. They'll inspect it and make you check it one way or another and then you are fucked.

 

Learn to travel light. It doesn't take many $25-$100 overweight bag fees for things to add up.

 

Learn to budget for the total trip. How much will the flight cost? Your luggage? Transport?

 

The last airline I flew with, air new zealand, had a weight limit for carry-on as well as the checked baggage. Pacific Blue and the others that fly to Australia have a similar policy.

 

On the way home I'm planning on wearing my boots and a couple of extra layers. Will make for an uncomfortable flight but I figure it's probably worth it.

 

Carry your boots over your shoulder. Counts as a "personal" item (i.e.like a purse) on most airlines so you can still have a regular carry on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On the way home I'm planning on wearing my boots and a couple of extra layers. Will make for an uncomfortable flight but I figure it's probably worth it.

 

Ship it to yourself.

 

I shipped via sea from NZ to Canada and it took 3 months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For hot days in the icicle, fill a nalgene 1/2 with grapes, 1/2 with crushed ice and top off with water. By mid day, the ice will be a cool sip of water, the grapes will be a nice sweet treat, and the whole thing won't weight anything more than a bottle of water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To increase friction when rapping on thin or single ropes: clip your rap device to the end of a runner girth hitched to your belay loop. The longer the runner, the greater the friction.

Another way I use to increase friction:

When using a runner girth hitched to your belay loop with the belay device at the end - clip a biner to your belay loop and run the rappel ropes through that and break "up". If you need to add more friction just clip another biner to your belay device biner and run the ropes through that and now you are breaking "down" and have put 2 more bends in the rope = tons of friction.

 

Another rappel setup tip:

Girth hitch a runner to your belay loop. Tie an overhand in the middle of it. Clip your belay device to the loop in the runner closer to you, clip a locking biner for anchoring to the top loop. Lean back on that, setup your rappel, when ready just unclip the top biner from the anchor - use the same biner to clip at the next anchor before going off rappel.

 

 

Dulfersitz:

For light days where you might get cliffed out and have to rappel but are not planning on pitching anything out with protection - leave the harness, take some anchor building materials (slings, biners, rings, webbing...), and a rope. Learn the Dulfersitz.

Even if you might need to use the rope for protection just tie it around your waist and use the terrain for protection and for belaying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dulfersitz:

For light days where you might get cliffed out and have to rappel but are not planning on pitching anything out with protection - leave the harness, take some anchor building materials (slings, biners, rings, webbing...), and a rope. Learn the Dulfersitz.

Even if you might need to use the rope for protection just tie it around your waist and use the terrain for protection and for belaying.

 

Have you ever done a Dulfersitz???? sure in a pinch i would do it, but never for fun. I mean if you like friction burns on your crotch and shoulders, and burning holes in your gear, than ya go for it.... I practiced it once, and i couldnt decide between having my ass on fire, or all of my weight on my balls.

dulfersitz.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When forced to stay in a hotel, make us of the complimentary stove.

 

Spring_Break_07_057.jpg

 

That is awesome :tup: :tup: :tup:

 

I've boiled eggs with the in-suite coffee maker. It takes about two hours to get them fully hard-boiled and most coffee makers auto shut off after 1 hour. So be aware you need to cycle the power after and hour.

 

A few boiled eggs plus a bowl of Cheerios and OJ == bfast of champions. (milk and OJ kept cold in the ice bucket, of course)

 

Get a real job so you can afford to eat out like normal folks is also an alternative

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Must open your mind young jedi..im sittin at 6 weeks with access to 2 months LOA

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When forced to stay in a hotel, make us of the complimentary stove.

 

Spring_Break_07_057.jpg

 

That is awesome :tup: :tup: :tup:

 

I've boiled eggs with the in-suite coffee maker. It takes about two hours to get them fully hard-boiled and most coffee makers auto shut off after 1 hour. So be aware you need to cycle the power after and hour.

 

A few boiled eggs plus a bowl of Cheerios and OJ == bfast of champions. (milk and OJ kept cold in the ice bucket, of course)

 

Get a real job so you can afford to eat out like normal folks is also an alternative

Or just hit the free continental breakfast that most hotels have nowadays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×