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Blake

Random Tips and Tricks Thread - not spray

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Who has got some great little tips for climbing (any aspect) that aren't necessarily common knowledge or found in many guides? I'll start with a couple.

 

When fording a river on approach/deproach: After you cross the stream, make sure your feet are as dry as possible before re-socking and re-booting. I usually end up using the high-up ankle part of my socks to thoroughly dry my whole feet quickly. This way you aren't putting a wet-sock back into your shoe. Nothing will ruin a long trip faster than getting screwed up feet on your first day.

 

When TRing a climb, especially with someone who is new or not fast at clipping themselves to the anchors and setting up a rappel:

 

When you lead the pitch, temporarily clip straight to the chains with a daisy. Untie, thread through the bottom rings, and re-tie. Then clip a couple QDs or lockers to the bolts. Clip your rope through these carabiners (yours) and have you partner lower you off. This way you can TR with the rope rubbing/tensioning over your own equipment, but still connected to the chains. When the 2nd climber reaches the top, they can just remove the QDs and lower off.

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When you are at the top of a lead and setting up a TR, pull up a few meters of rope, tie a loop and clip it to youself before untying to thread the rope through the links.

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Use a large garbage bag inside your pack. It keeps everything dry and can be used as a bivy, a raincoat, etc. I also pack fuel bottles in a plastic bag.

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If you want to use the garbage bag technique, try "compactor bags." They are VERY tough and durable!

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When you are at the top of a lead and setting up a TR, pull up a few meters of rope, tie a loop and clip it to youself before untying to thread the rope through the links.

you should do this and clip the bite to your rap/belay loop...keeps you on lead, protected by the last piece while you thread the anchor! :tup:

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Rack with a yosemite draw on every cam, it simplifys the whole trad thing.

I don't use this system much anymore, but it kept me in one piece during the 5.10 learning curve.

 

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When you are at the top of a lead and setting up a TR, pull up a few meters of rope, tie a loop and clip it to youself before untying to thread the rope through the links.

you should do this and clip the bite to your rap/belay loop...keeps you on lead, protected by the last piece while you thread the anchor! :tup:

 

Exactly, and be really clear with the belayer so they never take you off belay.

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When enduring an unplanned bivy, sleep with your helmet on. It will keep you from bashing your head on adjacent rocks during bouts of uncontrollable shivering.

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. This way you aren't putting a wet-sock back into your shoe. Nothing will ruin a long trip faster than getting screwed up feet on your first day.

 

 

Remember when we melted my shoes and sock trying to dry them? :lmao:

 

My tip: when drying shoes over a fire, you don't need to put them in the fire.

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Rack with a yosemite draw on every cam, it simplifys the whole trad thing.

I ndon't use this system much anymore, but it kept me in one piece during the 5.10 learning curve.

 

What's a yosemite draw???

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Rack with a yosemite draw on every cam, it simplifys the whole trad thing.

I ndon't use this system much anymore, but it kept me in one piece during the 5.10 learning curve.

 

What's a yosemite draw???

 

I believe it's a quick draw fashioned from two biners and a single sling that can be extendes, as opposed to a dog-bone

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Duct tape your gear to your harness for those sketchy red points so you can slam those cams into the crack faster. ;)

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when flying to a climbing destination - as you de-board the plane take the pillow with you. it is a small and light bivy pillow.

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Carry 100% alcohol into the mountains to save weight.

 

You forgot the "Make your partner unwittingly" part

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Carry 100% alcohol into the mountains to save weight.

 

You forgot the "Make your partner unwittingly" part

 

Absolutely.

 

The tip and the trick.

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nothing's better for an unplanned bivy then a tiny mp3 player loaded-up w/ some really tranquil tunes

 

i like storing duck-tape on my trekking poles

 

percocet for long down hill slogs through godforsaken wilderness!

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Carry 100% alcohol into the mountains to save weight.

 

You forgot the "Make your partner unwittingly" part

 

No Dru, he's got it right. And so do you, partially...

 

The "Make your partner unwittingly" part goes in front of "carry the ice and mixers for your alcohol into the mountains." :)

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Duct tape is useful for things that break in the backcountry, but how to bring duct tape without bringing the whole roll?

 

Rap duct tape around your ski poles for how much you think you need.

 

Can also rap duct tape around MSR fuel bottles.

 

 

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If you want to use the garbage bag technique, try "compactor bags." They are VERY tough and durable!

 

Similar to the garbage bag technique, stuff a space blanket into your helmet between the shell and suspension system. It's there when you're forced to bivy, and it doesn't get all beat up living in your pack for years waiting to be used.

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Duct tape is useful for things that break in the backcountry, but how to bring duct tape without bringing the whole roll?

 

Rap duct tape around your ski poles for how much you think you need.

 

steal other folks ideas and pass'em off as yer own! :grin:

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Duct tape is useful for things that break in the backcountry, but how to bring duct tape without bringing the whole roll?

 

Rap duct tape around your ski poles for how much you think you need.

 

Can also rap duct tape around MSR fuel bottles.

Change the tape out every season, as it won't last much beyond a year of so before it sticks itself beyond all comprehension to the bottle/pole/whatever. Then, if you can get it to come off, it shreds and turns into little pieces of sticky string. Trust me on this one... :rolleyes:

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On Multi-rap descents, after each rappel thread the end of the rope that you'll be pulling through the next anchor before you start to pull it. Stop when you get to the 1/2way point, and away you go.

 

On hard trad, when you need to climb fast through a section (tips layback, etc) figure out what cam you will need through the crux. Below this point, clip the piece to the rope, and to your harness. When you are flailing to hang on, you can just un-clip it from your harness, plug it in, and keep climbing.

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Plan ahead with water to save weight. If need energy from drinks, bring electrolyte pills instead.

 

Do not carry water if you think you are going to pass several streams. Instead, buy one of those collapsible plastic cups and keep it in your pocket. When you come across a stream, pull out the cup and drink from the stream. It beats bending over with a pack and drinking from the stream.

 

here's what one looks like:

http://www.shopzilla.com/8N_-_cat_id--12040100__nwylf--__oid--702179962

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Duct tape is useful for things that break in the backcountry, but how to bring duct tape without bringing the whole roll?

 

Rap duct tape around your ski poles for how much you think you need.

 

steal other folks ideas and pass'em off as yer own! :grin:

 

oooo. didn't see that one. oops.

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