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Kraken

Two dead on Rainier?

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My buddy down there in WA said that he saw on the news that two people died on Rainier sometime last week. I haven't heard anything about this and thought I would have heard something about it here if it happened.

 

I know that two twin brothers (54 years old each) died up here on Denali last week. My friend who works for Talkeetna Air Taxi had to deal with the bodies and she said "I've never seen bodies so broken and black before."

For some reason I think my friend is talking about this, but I could be wrong.

 

Does anyone have any info?

 

 

 

EDIT: Nevermind, I saw the thread in the General section just after posting this. Sorry everybody.

Edited by Clintoris

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According to the news, one of the h ikers was found wearing shorts and cotton t shirt. The other wearing cotton hiking pants. They had gear for an over night at Camp Muir, including wind/rain gear. But for some unknown reason, they didn't use it. Could it be that they died of stupidity?

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A friend of mine just climbed Emmons this Monday-Tuesday. He said THREE people got hit by avalanche at Camp Muir. There are fatalities, not sure how many. Ironically, we planned to climb Nisqually the same very days but decided that all good routes are out because of the fresh snow.

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... He said THREE people got hit by avalanche at Camp Muir. There are fatalities, not sure how many....

 

What?

 

And what would 'lanch Muir? Something huge off the Cowlitz?

 

How could we not have heard anything else by now about this?

 

Seems like every year right before I go a bunch of folks go and get killed... Wife doesn't like that....

 

-Fear

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EDIT: Nevermind, I saw the thread in the General section just after posting this. Sorry everybody.

 

Ummm... I can't find it. Sorry I'm stupid. Anybody want to send me the link?

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I was up there when they were found.. It was pretty amazing how little concern there was around camp, and how scarce the "search" effort was. The news reports didn't seem to match up all that well with what happened. At least they gave them probably more credit than they deserved. "experienced climbers"

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According to the news, one of the h ikers was found wearing shorts and cotton t shirt. The other wearing cotton hiking pants. They had gear for an over night at Camp Muir, including wind/rain gear. But for some unknown reason, they didn't use it. Could it be that they died of stupidity?

 

Victims of hypothermia often times begin shedding their clothing. This isn't the first time that bodies have been recovered in various stages of undress.

 

Your remarks are incredible crass, pathetic really.

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i ask this question seriously - how many of us "experienced climbers" wear/carry ANY cotton clothing on big mountains like rainier?

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I wear cotton on all climbs, big or small. I never subscribed to the "cotton kills" mantra.

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Not sure what "experienced" means, but I've worn cotton shirt and shorts to Camp Schurman. Nice and comfortable in the heat in mid-summer. I find they are heavy with sweat by then though, so leave them there to pick up on the way down. Great for the hike out.

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A number of interesting comments here…

 

Matt is right, some people wear cotton in the mountains. I saw people (“climbers”) on the Muir Snowfield wearing cotton last Saturday. And I admit, sometimes even I wear cotton… But not last Saturday. I’m a fan of synthetic clothing and had it on all day.

 

Part of this is that some climbers "push on" instead of putting on more (or changing) clothing. How many times have you done that saying to yourself, "I’ll change when I get to Camp Muir" (or another destination?) Hypothermia can set in very FAST. I've seen people who are doing "ok to reasonable" literally shutdown and crash very quickly b/c of hypothermia. I can't help but wonder.

 

They weren't "climbing," but many people consider going to Camp Muir "climbing." Having worked closely with the media, I see how hard they work to get things correct. Remember, their audience isn’t climbers, its “America.”

 

The search effort was not "scare." We found Tim and Greg almost immediately after we begin looking for them on Monday evening. We don't launch a helicopter search every time someone turns up late. If we did, we'd have a helicopter flying around almost every day. We always consider the unique qualities of each situation, but we often wait 24 hours after they are officially due out.

 

We have a few more things to figure out about what might have happened. This one is puzzling, but more than anything, very sad.

 

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Mike, you hit the nail on the head - "puzzling, but more than anything, very sad." So very sad. They didn't HAVE to die! Every time I've thought about this incident, that phrase comes out. Who knows how many times they could have made one right decision, and come out of it ok. Our prayers are with the family.

Dan L.

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A number of interesting comments here…

 

Part of this is that some climbers "push on" instead of putting on more (or changing) clothing. How many times have you done that saying to yourself, "I’ll change when I get to Camp Muir" (or another destination?) Hypothermia can set in very FAST.

 

Yeah, that went through my mind when I was up there yesterday. The wind down low chilled easily yesterday despite sunny, otherwise warm weather. I forced myself to stop twice to throw on a jacket and gloves when I felt cold (and then take them off again later).

 

The search effort was not "scare." We found Tim and Greg almost immediately after we begin looking for them on Monday evening. We don't launch a helicopter search every time someone turns up late. If we did, we'd have a helicopter flying around almost every day. We always consider the unique qualities of each situation, but we often wait 24 hours after they are officially due out.

 

You guys do an awesome job, IMO. thumbs_up.gif

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Hello all,

I am rather new to this forum, and this is my first post. I felt a deep need to respond to this thread.

Greg Stark was my fiance, and I cannot tell you in words how deeply his death has affected me. Greg was an experienced hiker,....not a climber. He was an avid fly-fisherman always looking for the next adventure. He lived his life to the fullest. I know that Greg did not give up. He fought for his life up there, and he and his uncle used every tool they had to stay alive.

I was very honored to have hiked up to the Muir snowfield with Mike G. on Thursday (Aug. 4th, 2005). It was amazing to have spent that day with him, as difficult as this hike was for me. I have so much respect for that man, both as a remarkable individual and as a highly respected ranger.

While hiking down the mountain, I realized how "alive" the mountain is. I will always remember this day, and will always respect this mountain.

For everyone out there,....please, travel safely and "trust your guide".

484969-stark_gregory.jpg.4e7729c2cb7944ce23ffe09e6f00ba5c.jpg

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Cheers to you for writing and honoring your fiancee. You are strong to take on your healing and make that hike as well. I'm really sorry for your loss.

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Thanks also for choosing to accept that he died doing what he loved and not doing something "stupid."

 

I hope you can use this as a tool to move forward with your life.

 

Best of luck. Stick around and post more often.

-Clint

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MZ thanks for posting, we all agonize when anyone is injured or killed in the mtn's. Perhaps Greg was a climber, the minute he put on his harness. I've found that this website is an amazing place to experience healing, to learn and grow. As mentioned, please stick around..........

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Thank you for your words of support. You're right...this website is an amazing place to heal, learn, and grow. I have found myself laughing out loud to certain threads. It seems as though everyone here is part of a small, intimate circle of friends. I have found hiking to be very therapeutic lately. I am grateful that Greg died doing what he wanted to do...That mountain will forever hold a special place in my heart. I look at that mountain every morning and can't help but think of it as a tremendous and glorious monument. Thanks again for the words of encouragement and hope. Hope to see you on the trails!

Sincerely,

Christy

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