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TandF

Cold Feet

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Climbed Shasta this past weekend, and my feet froze! I am wearing the Nepal Extreme. The boots are insulated so I think the cold comes from the soles, so would overboots be the best solution? Or should I try some there stuff first so I can save some $$$$. However I do like my toes smirk.gif

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Maybe your boots are too tight. If you cut off the circulation to your toes, your feet will get cold.

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I have the same 'insulated' boots. The solution is to keep moving. They are not good boots for moving slow or stopping in. I'm afraid you will need plastics because those are probably some of the warmer leathers made.

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Also, you might try thinner socks. It is counter-intuitive, but if the socks are too thick they can constrict blood flow, otherwise get the next size larger boot.

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Thanks for the help. Will try different sock combo's, but can't loosen my laces any more, my boot would fall off. Hope I don't have to buy a larger size crazy.gif

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Also, think about getting a pair of VBL socks (Vapor Barrier Liners). Climb High makes a decent pair. This will prevent the moisture from your feet wicking away into your other sock layers and will keep them warm and dry. I typically use a liner sock, then the VBL, then a large expedition sock on winter ascents or climbs like Denali and they work perfectly. No need to get overboots on summer climbs in the Cascades! You can also just buy a pair of plastics too, but the Extremes should be warm enough with this combo, and cheaper too!

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Even cheaper than the Climb High VBL socks are oven bags from the grocery store. I've used a single pair for up to 3 days with no holes, I think they cost about a buck per bag. But, make sure you dry your feet out at the end of every day to avoid contracting "swamp foot".

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I forgot to mention, to make sure that the rest of your body is warm too. You'd be surprised at how many people forget to wear a hat. If you are warm, you body will look for a way to get rid of the heat. It will dilate the blood vessels in your hands and feet. You can, in effect, force the heat into your feet.

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Another recommendation: Replace the inner footbed of your boot. I have these really nice cushy ones that were $10 from Walgreens. Some people use $30 Superfeet brand but I don't think they work that well. There were about 15 different choices at Walgreens. The footbeds they provide you in the boots always suck.

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Stefan said:

Another recommendation: Replace the inner footbed of your boot. I have these really nice cushy ones that were $10 from Walgreens. Some people use $30 Superfeet brand but I don't think they work that well. There were about 15 different choices at Walgreens. The footbeds they provide you in the boots always suck.

You got that right. thumbs_up.gif

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catbirdseat said:

Stefan said:

Another recommendation: Replace the inner footbed of your boot. I have these really nice cushy ones that were $10 from Walgreens. Some people use $30 Superfeet brand but I don't think they work that well. There were about 15 different choices at Walgreens. The footbeds they provide you in the boots always suck.

You got that right. thumbs_up.gif
Indeed! thumbs_up.gif

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The foot bed is a good idea. I have been playing around with the idea of getting custom cork foot beds for comfort and arch support. This will be the best reason for trying them out. I will have to admit that the rest of my body was not doing that well for staying warm as well. I will try the bread sack this weekend on old snowy. it will not be nearly as cold but a good time to try things out.

 

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Another trick is the shake-n-heat.

 

You can get ones that are supposed to fit in your boot, but I can't imagine they would go in any boot that would give you any performance... rolleyes.gif

 

I tuck them down next to the insde of my calf, just at the top of the boot (sort of at the 4 o'clock position on the left leg, and the 8 o'clock on the right), nice and comfy, and it warms the blood heading down to your toes keeping them toasty. laugh.gif

 

Used my regular Nepal tops like that in the Rockies early winter. cool.gif

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TandF said:

Climbed Shasta this past weekend, and my feet froze! I am wearing the Nepal Extreme. The boots are insulated so I think the cold comes from the soles, so would overboots be the best solution? Or should I try some there stuff first so I can save some $$$$. However I do like my toes smirk.gif

i reckon you shouldnt make a judgement based on one experience. lack of sleep water and food can cause your body to not work so well too. in other words your feet coulda got cold for reasons other than the thickness of your boots. in the interest of saving money try and stay hyrdated and well fed on your next climb and see how your feet do.

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Dear Foot disease,

 

I will have to admit that the rest of my body was not doing that well for staying warm as well.

 

Feet often get cold first. Get thicker boots and yes DO consider overboots, continuous movement, frequent change of socks (to dry) if possible, new footbeds, non tight fitting boot system (socks laces etc), foot powder to decrease sweat, vb liners (trash bags gore tex or whatever works), and most of all KEEP MOVING or go down ( this includes wiggling toes or body movement). If you cant wiggle your toes a little then your boots are possibly too small for circulation the wrong size\fit or both.

 

PS I dont beleive if you body is warm and feet cold that you need a hat or headwarming gear. Otherwise I agree.

 

 

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Stefan said:

Dwayner told me this:

 

If your feet are cold, put on a hat!

 

vladislavs told me this:

if you cold. you drink vodka. wave.gif

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Buy smartwool socks. I've used them everywhere from Alaska to Saudi Arabia (they worked miracles keeping my feet dry in that heat!) and they always perform. (I need a picture of myself pointing at my feet and smiling for this. Maybe a fatty endorsement contract too. bigdrink.gif)

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Never tried oven bags, but I've tried the regular bread bags you can get at the grocery store. Bad idea. I don't know exactly what happened, but my feet were destroyed by the end of the trip. I think they might have been too slippery on the inside of the boot. I'm still losing toenails, and this was 3 months ago. mad.gif

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take off crampons when you don't need to be wearing

them (metal conducts heat away). Stand on foam pad or

balance on heels like a penguin to get toes out of the

snow. wiggle toes with each rest step. Nepal X-Treems are

pretty warm boots if they aren't so tight to inhibit

circulation. Sometimes a thick footbed and thin socks will

be warmer than the stock footbed and thick woolies.

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MysticNacho said:

Never tried oven bags, but I've tried the regular bread bags you can get at the grocery store. Bad idea. I don't know exactly what happened, but my feet were destroyed by the end of the trip. I think they might have been too slippery on the inside of the boot. I'm still losing toenails, and this was 3 months ago. mad.gif

I use bread bags alot. I have never lost a toenail. My boots are a little big for me. My feet are about a 10 3/4 and I get size 11 boots. When I used 10 1/2 tele boots, I jammed my toes a few times so I tightened the ankle eyelets. That seemed to work. I still had to keep my toenails short. But, to keep your feet warm in really cold weather, keeping the insulation dry is good. I wear a thin silk or capilene sock , a bread bag, and then a heavier wool sock. My socks fit snug without constricting and my feet aren't swimming in the boots either. I also use footbeds. I have made them out of lots of different materials since the early sixties. Felt, styrofoam, wool, insulite, and Aerogel. Aerogel was by far the warmest but disintegrates too quickly. I used an insole from each boot as a pattern. Now I have orthotic inserts that I glue various forms of insulite to.

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