Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
EricMPeterson

boots for the Cascades?

Recommended Posts

I am looking at getting some boots for climbs in the cascades. I plan on doing a guided trip up mt rainier, adams and probably hood. I was thinking about the vasque ice 9000, La Sportiva npal evo gtx and the trango s evo gtx. Anybody have recomendations? Also anybody know of a guide service for rainier other than RMI and Mountian Madness. I would like to keep the trip under 1000 dollars.

 

Thanks in Advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

can't speak for guide services, but i've had great luck with my asolo titans. plastic boots may keep yer feet warmer at higher altitudes or in colder temps, but will also take more out of yer wallet. but for what you say you are going to be doing any insulated leather or mixed leather/synthetic mountaineering boot will keep your feet warm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since you are likely thinking summer, and none of your mountains are super high, I'd suggest staying away from plastics just from a speed and comfort standpoint. I really love my sportiva Trango S EVO GTX boots. Make sure that when you get your boots, that you wear the type of socks you plan on using with them, otherwise you might get them a little small. Honestly, go to your local gear shop with your socks and just start trying things on. For 3 season cascades any decent mountaineering boot will do, so find the most comfortable and make sure your feet have enough room with your socks on.

 

For guides, I've never used a guide service to take me up mountains. I've taken training courses from AAI (American Alpine institute) and enjoyed their guides/instructors. Really though, there are a ton of guide services that will take you up Rainier, all different routes and for different prices.

 

Alpine Ascents International

American Alpine Institute - http://www.aai.cc/ProgramDetail/rainier/

RMI

International Mountain Guides

 

And those are just the ones that list Rainier trips. Any guide service [edit] may be able to take you up Rainier, assuming they have negotiated it so it doesn't hurt to look around at different sites.[/edit]

 

As far as cost goes, from people I know that have used guides for climbing, you kind of get what you pay for. Not in terms of safety, but experience. The longer, or less traveled routes are going to cost more, but you are going to enjoy the trip more. RMI is probably the cheapest for their basic 4 day summit climb, but again, you get what you pay for, though they will likely get you to the top.

 

Are you planning on doing the climb this year? Cause if so you should book soon, a lot of those climbs get filled up quickly.

Edited by gyro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, any guide service cannot take you up Mt. Rainier.Read this: Mount Rainier Climbing Guides Blog Let it be well known that the guide services who are awarded Guiding Concessions bid for the right to have a shared monopoly of sorts on Mountain Guiding withing the park, and that for economic reasons they guard them zealously, as any commercial opertaion might protect its territory.

 

The boot advice is quite good however. It could be that your intended choice of a boot is a little too much for this point in your climbing career, particularily for summertime use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Dan_Miller

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No, any guide service cannot take you up Mt.Rainier.Read this: Mount Rainier Climbing Guides Blog

 

The boot advice is quite good however. It could be that your intended choice of a boot is a little too much for this point in your climbing career, particularily for summertime use.

 

I know that there are only certain services authorized to operate within the park, but a link to a blog spot account with about as much text as a Louisiana dictionary isn't a compelling citation for what services are ok or particularly elucidating. Especially when your link is broken by a comma.

 

Edit: Straight from the source.

http://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvisit/mountaineering-guide-services.htm

Edited by gyro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've made a lot of climbs on the Cascade volcano's and, in the Summer, the only one that I think really warrants a full on plastic boot is the Big R, and even on that mountain I think I'd rather go with something lighter - all things considered. Yes, if you take some leather combo-boots you may get them wet on the hike to your camp and then start out with cold feet in the morning, but the klunkiness of any plastics I've ever worn is very significant.

 

To be honest, though, I'd have to say that I have not bought a pair of boots for almost ten years. Maybe they have wonder-boots now. I doubt it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boots?

 

Fit fit and fit...and your personal level of comfort.

 

People have gone up in the red Trangos but most will be happier with a little more boot.

 

But once again fit. Especially on the long slogs. Something in the Nepal or Trango Extreme's from Sportiva. Freeney, Triolet or Mont Blanc from Scarpa. Apex XT from Kayland. Best advice would be to try on a bunch and see what fits best.

 

Any of the guides Gyro listed will do you right.

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

two of your boots are full on winter ice climbing boots and would work for your summer pursuits but it is a bit overkill and prolly a bit too heavy. The trango should do fine for your summer (as well as winter) goals. But the problem is, does that boot fit you? Maybe not. You will need to go try different models but luckily, most brands have a model that will fit your needs, like the garmont towers. or scarpa something other.

 

The big guide outfits on rainier are RMI and Alpine Ascents. There is one more that I forget. I would recommend Alpine Ascents. (I used to work for them before they got the major rainier permit so maybe I am biased) I don't know how much it costs but you get what you pay for. RMI is cheaper but from what other climbers have told me, the experience wasn't that good. Hopefully things have changed since they got real competition now on the hill.

 

Good luck with your boot purchases and your alpine romps in our hills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plastic boots; Most people either love them or hate them. I prefer lighter boots.

Edited by RokIzGud

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

check out the used plastics at whittakermountaineering.com

click on their monsoon sale. they sell off their rentals for a great price. I got a pair that appeared to be barely used. since the price was so good, I was able to buy a pair of leather boots too.

google the Mt Rainier guide services for all the info you need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of good advice already. I would lean towards a lighter boot like the Trango unless you plan on doing more glacier/snow climbing exclusively. There aren't too many moderate climbs you can't do in them and they will be way more comfortable for approach hikes(if they fit you well) I've worn the Trango on Ranier and still have all ten toes...though the plastic boots or Nepals would be warmer. Good luck with your choice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boots?

 

Fit fit and fit...and your personal level of comfort.

 

People have gone up in the red Trangos but most will be happier with a little more boot.

 

But once again fit. Especially on the long slogs. Something in the Nepal or Trango Extreme's from Sportiva. Freeney, Triolet or Mont Blanc from Scarpa. Apex XT from Kayland. Best advice would be to try on a bunch and see what fits best.

 

Any of the guides Gyro listed will do you right.

 

Good luck!

 

I agree with this advice the most within this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am quite happy with Lowa Mnt Expert. My feet sweat a ton no matter what and I've found them fine for summer climbs and warm enough for 5-10 degree long day on hood.

front toe bail, and got them at a steal $189 from OMC--had just one pair for sale in my size. lowa boots work great for my feet. I haven't even switched the stock insole

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd have to say that I have not bought a pair of boots for almost ten years. Maybe they have wonder-boots now. I doubt it.

 

Actually they do make some wonder-boots these days. The current crop of new boots is pretty good.

 

But as been said already it is all about, the FIT :)

Warm and dry comes right after fit. I want fit first, then warm and if possible dry, in that order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First time up Rainier in September I wore a pair of Raichle GTX mountaineering boots - worked fine. My friend wore a pair of rented plastics and hated the stiffness. Have a pair of Scarpa Summits now that are AWESOME - warm and comfy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used the la sportiva makalu for year around use for years.

I think they had a different model name when I bought my first pair around 15 years ago.

I wear a thin liner sock and a goretex sock and my feet are always warm. That could just be me.

I sleep with them in my bivy sack under my bag to keep them somewhat unfrozen for the morning.

If they freeze it does royally suck but whatever.

Suck it up and get moving.

Pros: great edging - sticky on rock - flexible - down right stylish.

Cons: they suck when they freeze up!

My 2 cents :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go to all the climbing stores and try on all the boots,

buy what fits the best, REI has great return policy if your

a member, you can bring them in a month later if they are trashing

your feet for a exchange.

 

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×