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Jake Johnson

[TR] 9 Days in the Chiliwack Range - SE Mox, Lemolo. Redoubt, Spickard, NW Mox 06/24/2021

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Posted (edited)

Trip: 9 Days in the Chiliwack Range - SE Mox, Lemolo. Redoubt, Spickard, NW Mox

Trip Date: 06/24/2021

Trip Report:

 

9 Days in the Chilliwack Range - North Cascades National Park

 

 

 Climbers:

 Jake Johnson - Fort Collins, CO

Adam Moline - Sacramento, CA

Emilio Taiveaho - Chapel Hill, NC

 

Summary:

 Days 1 & 2 - Boat ride and bushwack up Perry Creek Basin

 Day 3 - SE Mox and Lemolo

 Day 4 - Move to Camp 7200 at head of Redoubt Glacier

 Day 5 - Redoubt

 Day 6 - Spickard and NW Mox

 Day 7 - Rest / Weather Day

 Day 8 - Attempt at West Buttress of W Subpeak of NW Mox, return to Perry Creek

 Day 9 - Hike out and Boat back to civilization

         

          A pilgrimage to the North Cascades has become an annual tradition and with climbing partners like Adam and Emilio, the draw to more remote and chossier locations grows steadily with each visit. This trip to the Chilliwack Range marked our first climbs in the Cascades outside of the Pickets. With Covid restrictions complicating entry from Canada, we were stoked about likely having the peaks of this range to ourselves for the week, which it appeared we did.

 

Day 1:

The first day of our adventure started as many good adventures do: on 3 hours of anxious sleep. Adam and Emilio had driven up from California on I-5 the day before and picked me up in Seattle in the late evening, not allowing much time for slumber. An early boat ride across Ross Lake to Little Beaver gave us plenty of daylight to trudge up the trail-less Perry Creek valley, but with 10 days worth of food and gear and virtually no sleep, we recognized it wouldn’t be an easy day. 

Emilio stretching out:

PAcS7XfaZQbTCiPry3lWG6hnQoaP0BjjK1A_rPfncUZMG4vZqis5iT_HJ6Tzmh2T-A0M0Dovv9LJlr4RJBL6gbGJ-sM10PbJxBh1R5eEEcWRNGL_xqsQbZqnHiUy81-5z8zvGPw

The boat ride:

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4.5 miles of maintained trail walking provided some early views, and then a comfortable forested grind to the Perry Creek Shelter. 

Views of Ross on the first mile of the Little Beaver trail:
jn0aOSa4G_9HmGkW5lrENGEPPxh8IcVU0zF-B3xCv-te7UuyE7OkUjYva7-cswTameIO6qde3gTQixdRnZyQ7j3_Q1WycpJU-OZCTLjAHYuGwGkaWAjz0SPNhfGc4Rhz8d7d5Ms

After some initial route finding and stream crossings up the valley, the real schwacking began, and I would agree with all statements of parties that have come before us - some of the densest growth that I’ve forced my body through. 

A classic North Cascades stream crossing:
Y17GxB1HASwJamVs08bJqLMmOVPKi3jySpMktPwdbTYw3043Yti-lwW-3JUbUBtQfjF5pT32iZo8gVfjtwpXumtLr0iJv347qwkoTvXpkwgzzrgtpleDympwkFnyo8DYlXk9QZk

The best picture I could find of the dense growth sections:

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A few hours later we were blessed with some talus and space to breathe and refill on water from the creek before plunging back into some older growth for several less abusive miles. 

A tattered and needle-covered Emilio:

4vSfQ2vsGokv9SA1ft3_8gXPN9-8nQu_zW-Lrjk0aANpOnRZAM95DM1tk2MiEzuWbI8bb63b0MuxrEKPktdM16UV0n6Ul1gnfhzks_yUM4XuGEQKSBYi0G0Kwo2lJg

Talus relief from the dense brush bushwhacking:

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By mid afternoon the towering summit of Lemolo was in sight, but the lack of sleep and pounds of pine needles accumulating under our clothing started taking a toll and we found some large boulders in the talus to call home for the evening.

Upper Perry Creek Basin:
mlB2e_DRA5cPXaI84XWzqQi2tHjdkvAVc9qqiFOBRqo7dW0VqSkrutBrPx8lMm9VWO3s_ZlQTMhqoT7jYRF_-2R9qmzfinbPy54o3s4vwculu1yFLn6mrVzaApV0z88rY14fgo8

 

Day 2:

The next morning we were faced with a decision: to push hard to the top of the valley and ascend the snowpack to the ridge (our original plan), or to take it a bit easier and settle for camp at the top of the valley. With over a week remaining in the backcountry we opted for the later, and in retrospect this was the right decision.

Bushwhacking in the upper portion of the valley:

QwxHG0cGnESqRZCkttxcEyhO3fWbvrg8rlHcqVz84WfMlnqUlD1eeNisRM3ha5QWzD6xUOziY6Ak1Pylmfqnd8vLPiTdLJ7-qXIgQUhkjfSS6w4bx673dQGkALAbSCD2Pe4fVF8

MU3WgaPkKl06YcUqa3rF2l2Jscy3FMJSCzcUUSDV8zQDIBjYg0utdWIPL7FPjOQkwc8Iyu8Z2lkeUTFcxuEIQzCSN2hs0bCKNrH558924rFKbsWzZ8mhzj3NEeAYZbf7G2TQU5A

The schwacking re-intensified a bit higher in the valley and we were happy to take the evening to wash our clothes and bodies at the head of Perry Creek.

Dinner and a bath at the headwaters of Perry Creek:

b1cFEMuDON1JVxzBgj5gDHSFURdobVwlopcuvuDAORTjdwMHQN_5aVzpsn2LI-iEDdZRTqpTrXPOKDSCXS_bOQeEyLYlkCQqUaIulomZNjLuTNZ3vDPaB1tKDaeCxw

Some underwear bouldering:

kr3d5SBmGCraj0U-NgWhPLjyJmBJMBHCM-E5jdchSXPYbsWrHJvmLo6qbYUBWGGVuc49cQRAzRW8QZgj30gVdftKbuRkTMNoV1GU2eKJEmvj34eC7kbLtm9yDU8FIA

 

Day 3:

With an early start, we had the opportunity to make back some time in our schedule. We trudged up the glacier slowly and steadily, gaining the elevation to the ridge with heavy packs over several hours.

Steady progress climbing up out of Perry Creek Basin:

4USctiwp2FyPTxBZ-wYa4vcjIVc8NgOT6vq0cPgVYvbDoaDTFjIchiWUrIEiwi3EZ48ArpDIp5KKxkeVW-roWbpB7jWx8zgCaFFZAuyvygzKWy8v9-Mgta9AYKBmKg

e0vYxGRI6PV8eCVSGZ1dEhXPYD2oB-6kd-qLho9Xmku3950lqlO2tqrQGFvrgxV5TExPlMZatTxTvLn0Gu7i1GvUGKhQVvxOZIWB-d_oxYRR2wXA5RUnFPjKRE9atQ

SlJfodUTjSeS5O-ghqjXt5HR4jHyGnvhzhptGgfmz2D83ouSKeGlXfcfk1-FX5OygGRTKE4du13uTpO1_x0YvAiJdDi4bOjabjZwi15JRYbXP1BeD7cIYPusKrh4NA

-Vxb_xFCrHVQcQdyNaupkcQmuzVRzqYFEmq8R1Z28k0xLU5OgQBPu_DYzoxtJb-ZYyHInfVfu__lmWgoyz7H5O0IlSMunZbcej_yVSva1Ftbhze8KhGu7VpqMVaa0w

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By midday we were standing at the base of the gully that marks the start of the route up SE Mox (aka Hard Mox). Leaving the packs behind, we quickly soloed the loose but easy pitches to the summit. 

The initial gully on SE Mox:

cXPsc_pvLTKWkThDvN8_MYM3uguezZNEbjRpZdxsCQrFpTaz-yal9lajxCuvgJJ2kdvpjkPpcfuZb8fqpJbw_AUxMQZ3WJE2DleQp9KLyXCJ-2PfkKM5flvXH6jh6g

More exposed climbing on the upper pitches:

16ysLuICSUD83JuYDnuRCpSqib5uO0957kBrKNOqymYHS3uERhlJuP89LeXbTT13dFoKsHEt6a_WJ1S-_xIo4wi21U_jozcdpXg1aeJqrt0eYnDwExy9woIpN2FOow

From here we eyed our primary objective of the trip: a deliciously exposed ridge connecting SE Mox to its sub peak - known as Hardest Mox until Eric Wehrly and Rolf Larsen summited it via the East Face in 2007. They dubbed it Lemolo, and the lack of visitors to such a wild and untamed peak was too intriguing for us to resist. Eric was kind enough to share some beta for the region and encourage us to attempt the climb to the summit of Lemolo via the ridge (their descent route after their first ascent of the summit). 

Looking from SE Mox across to Lemolo:
aSYMEaYvqY3LR1zz_MyhBOtCoKSCTMxY6mqIHORuplH8623dMVCWszxyDCiHiZhMgTSZCJ_ITL8KTTeqXdHZqBJCEOn_D35G5yRJBaXC9G9irvookeIWamwARxTB4g

Navigating the first portion of the ridge:

J1lnxW96-0Xj4g6YjRR3YF9xeHY_jJuYqbCQ3PH0rBVN7XWoHQCkctr0PojL_c5TLS-XA2vw2GXkFOOK78_kUy-i2-x9vuWirXUvAqGPeJ0iqmalPaUDC4vAqiHBvw

 

After about 2.5 min of admiration and intimidation, we began moving along the ridge and found it to be exactly what we had hoped for; exposed choss with just enough relief to keep me pressing forward. Some sections actually did have some solid stone, and made for some of the most fun 5.fun climbing I’ve done in my life. 

Adam and Emilio making moves on the traverse:

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Shot of me on the ridge - This is probably the best photo to demonstrate scale and position of the route:

qzx2AYyIzc1RMheLq5HEJmdI1Lzoo-c8lV0K7HF_LNmHynzKpbgjY3TfFetLKQWGNtexsDt3hsNV1_xWIF0nhFn9NqD9H3hP5FfCrRlbJepz4Jh6KjnKp_r1XopBLQ

Upon reaching the summit tower of Lemolo, we found Eric and Rolf’s tat from 2007, and we enjoyed the views in all directions, especially savoring the view looking back at SE Mox which few have had the privilege of soaking in. In the event that this traverse to the summit is a new route to the peak, we’d call it “Process and Reality” 5.4 X. 

Old rappel tat on the Summit of Lemolo:

SsLXdHgv66RUgojfF21kptaK7ffNXE5OQuQRqwxDFxYF0RA0R8zXEUA96xlS6BN1-vWrRaTZiGU68SIFQse7tygjZtic6AJpLCad_Obl7pOZ_yj-HQE33NU7_S86Gw

Group summit selfie:

kVW8UYQrA5dDMQcokH6WU-7wr4EF8P4FLHV_LbKAt7291ejJS0VGXZ4qWEjrlteJP6Ts_cWCO0RHpe9B8GBpTqfe-XP1YlKiZmTQGagAu9UmbtKoO6_HsJJZc5nDOQ

“Solo for safety” was the motto of the day, as we avoided roping up and placing gear for all the climbing due to all the loose blocks. The theme was confirmed as we rappelled the SE Mox route - falling rock from pulling the rope provided the most apparent danger we experienced all day.

Rappel on SE Mox

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A bit of caving beneath the upper glacier provided the evening’s water, and we settled onto a steep scree slope for the night. The layers of sky at dusk after a full day of mountain moving brought a smile to my chapped lips as we drifted into dreamland.

Bivy just below the route on SE Mox:
cDWR8fQHCzfe1VF30gdhJJ-zhjXvKFyZB3lxMSnFOIVa6w8MpeO7h7nNytnioyaiCa--KXKZWs4MecT4x2NLQhGzVgNZgH045LzF4klykjTw3sqqrvCM_WqaiODoAg

9UibUPrW_TTyKVv7Z-6a0Th1k2SLoyIqJFrZUlLXSohjEY2OA16Y_Kk2NdA5Uef8QXIjH5VC_XtyUA-Phftsx5x_aLswHOIoAWMKBcVPRxn-yQaMf19Aq8dlw_f2yw

 

Day 4:

Emilio and I sipped some coffee and enjoyed the morning as Adam descended the upper part of the glacier to retrieve a Croc that had escaped in the night. The versatile footwear was far too valuable to leave behind until our descent back into the valley later in the week. Additionally, the risk of failing to recover it later and littering the most pristine place any of us had ever been was unacceptable. When we finally got moving around midmorning, the going was slow, and our route finding was unimpressive. Most beta for the area assumes an approach from the West, so crossing the Ridge of Gendarmes from the East was a bit of a trick. Convinced that the “canon hole” described by Becky was the intended route, Adam and I waited as Emilio loaded himself into the tight gully only to be shot back out along with some airborne scree. 

Some failed route finding in unstable gullies:
pCUUn2lhqx5YKUbjCFArz9BsX_7g971nhEh3BpunTUIpBzavn7gVYlYJllNAtk8Bmrbl5gH58JQTJ7lJTlYQiQ-ExoTyWtHtv4bE1uyWOglwDDw0THy1hcK_NmWHcA

Looking back at SE Mox:

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We eventually found the correct route and slid and rambled and postholed our way to Camp 7200 beneath the impressive SE crown of Redoubt. 

View of the long and sunny trudge from Ridge of Gendarmes to Camp 7200:
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Gnarly broken snow and ice:

I4Uc8IKkyK2bL0w2HNxDXCVPXdyHbJ1ihbmFXwHkTh2SjWVKqpDV5htc6Tv30lvcnhTPkW6KqXFKVrj_tvBFGsddkI_4OZikyyWjnMOHYqxaymQc7u6Zk0DFSD-CNQ

Camp 7200':

KAKdiZXqX2de_YHLsEMg3z3QQp35H0XT7hG0vCdi7wRYd7CBZeRgaBFNORBbfDyfC3j0kZh0o_8JiVlv6kY19RGn2hBP3V11hFtPA3y586wOgVNIM5My8GPVQ4WIwg

 

Day 5:

With the assumption that Mt. Redoubt would probably be an easy 3rd class venture, we prepared ourselves accordingly and set off around midmorning. The glacier walking was smooth and enjoyable without the weight of the packs, and we gleefully scampered up the steeper sections on the south side of the mountain, often stopping to look back and eye lines on Bear Mountain.

Climbing towards Mt Redoubt:

94xRg52cAQDGVvXyYbiyaKsSBFCIVp_GCoh_P0v_usVXHS9M2B4HoOKygFNed_9RLkjMbN8YddiZoAnr2c4xMAFqJqBt7nEDBUGyr9ekJ_cxF2djx8MCWT1KBf742A

U_WJcVBKfGjIK7ZSgfcVpotiIzFLMDrp9eDlReOirp6crwLnXyqflOixjCU_oGRhiixk3YSa65PbAI4U5zTFJtF66iyp4jF0kx6O_U3nMAfDGqvaJl2_yTA_w2xx7w

A wild Emilio and Bear Mountain:

cs1L4yICw4YFV_Zvjhm4lGUgnAdT-yr-bRpfMii7skcYGDuJCBTtBlMKIQUDu5EPFUteMyeO9KbxJzHm4Nzs6f4rJc5I8eDtRNb6aadDCveKQRA1CfWmTDSMXsz6Pw

I found the towering buttresses of Redoubt to be super impressive, and our gully of choice took us deep within the heart of the mountain. We found ourselves beneath the summit block with a couple of options, all appearing to be 5th class. After making some mental adjustments and reframing the level of focus that would be required, we made the few easy moves without issue. 

Exploring the low 5th class options to the true summit:

HMMPhYYg1VBljzj3tFgzRibfPHTNB_ajTv-rGEaTtj8jkpESUdJeZcowqBZlwuU9tC35VviuhgL6vU1mLTR5471zebM6qwOxeLnTt3jTeipMGuXnCNmMWxjHao7yTA

Knowing our return to camp would only require an hour or so, we spent the better part of the morning on top of the mountain, hanging in the shade just off the summit and traversing across the buttresses and subpeaks on the summit ridge.

A morning spent on the summit of Redoubt:

McuL7X7pDIecxqhr4ZKl2QA4h89ew-023-LOpjV1nqui5fB0UAnWT7SbrY_avJv9MkhMS_cDMBCXWsdMDIPof8coiQtPv4911wPk6pU50ixypwIcdLSIuznzPX5niw

G21iwP9tMcxokCHT54ENzD_aNt3h1YJV2_hV-Y16iIOl5KlrRfaN100Bhotu9XFQBKsdTrcqw6GIhTbwVhuR_N3XqnPufpPNRdK_QzTy_gJ5j2VdY9G_lwCp9muraQ

CAOpvG6FP_ekTzBsRv1zUxx7gcX3n-Jl6-saYDeAi0PVXP0YPN_c8ue-nJ6BXyqjQsFGJE5mLCYkIsBkzJfARBWyrNzTXWgKKx8JyoVdP0dDzZyIC_GjsUm3OhNHPg

Downclimbing off the summit block required some focus again, but then it was smooth sailing down the gully and joyful plunging on the glacier back to camp.

Downclimbing the 5th class:

2GgqoZaQ8s1YAdiR_pZNkcvoYDzZdJvsaRNiePhs5oBxqEhs11TDI-XsY3g8MGnR2zE_V5kBOR8HT5GXxKqNsXCYBHR5ImKn2GyrJvwu9RDg3RPqlOHP2mAkyZwqRg

Enjoying views on the slide down:

W41l-geiO1GtEjxUC4JMtR29B7BsXgTv4PNYK9n-EnOYF832zNH7eT6SYEcNBmdT5NZTCdjER13m0NCYEVKIQ_ASRmxaxg3D_5WjNcURMpjYAYXmyEk0RwHm1sD4VA

Relaxing in camp:

uXAEONKfPq8oYKVj8oHYiM3R1bmw0FxvWRfS8FYH8ulF7H8I7H3BX-VgaGICnlEkNRCS7UBkb1rBL9iI2_PfMoeh3d4nMAidH1NdrN0y1vHMEXwTtW2HfIJGt-ehRA

Milky Way:

1ngVdyxMYGsKL4WJzeco5phc6U-w4nCQWmM_N2BcFyLbUfORkYG2p3vjo7r0mI1ZVN9DZVbiONkV14JrzpPjtn6L71dSAOhD1QCAiWtz1MfEwA1kv6bdIqkQ4xl8aA

 

Day 6:

After some discussion about how we wanted to spend the remaining days of the trip, it was determined that we would try to double up and hit Spickard and NW Mox on day 6. Again, leaving the packs behind made for smooth glacier walking, and Adam and I were soon following Emilio’s charge up the firm snow of Spickard’s SW couloir in the early morning. 

SW Couloir of Spickard (taken later in the day):

m7mCebblvju0Jw6HI30k9TYGEnb2DRz0o8NZ9ELvpZDSDWfMAeCbl3phCrQ2m1UBVaqIiVf6j1a8Io9FBnZwB-aDHA5jYviMEKMomkE-E_Yc5AAp0Wi2_zrF7YTnpA

Following Emilio and Adam up Spickard:

fgYahIASNxMZsi4cFS_-JvfakmNqotz7pvRjTcT550UUS-sxd9NjaHUG9Jt7diW_qc2i1Hr1caWwx_guZy4aWlrB0av_UkCkufNYMkfV3y4VVuVfpxt-XCoVfynqag

Views of Silver Lake, a quick stop on the summit, and a descent via the south slopes made for a nice tour of the mountain.

Silver Lake as seen from Mt Spickard:

VPztYSASYJlUA87NOOTgxo1ZOP2gCa4qA8NOeaexf_p2OD_T8nV9BSKocblm-Ixr4MU4uhj0gNQIYOfkoWhCXQPEhZyETc9fqFjemmwoatCJvRJjMAG_Lj3TTY9zmQ

 It’s worth noting that the prize for “Chossiest Gully” of the trip might go our chosen route back over the ridge from the south slopes of Spickard into the Ouzel Basin. 

Descending snow beneath the angry gully:

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Back on the main glacier. NW Mox up next (top left of photo):

1_bBANECYLj4yyfUUAdaVeL3RGSClj7tdfYMz909nXnOMCQuwPOz7e8lU12xRbeUP9kgwlnmI2qwjBsf2lbNimHeTjTwcRga8f5Qfd09Fh6fwdiE7rpKoUpf5FPxsg

Next up was NW Mox (aka Easy Mox). Our intent was to ascend via the North Ridge and descend via the West Ridge for variety, so the crampons and axes came along for the ride as we hopped off the snow and onto the long but easy scramble up the ridge. 

Easy Walking up NW Mox. Spickard in background:

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Lemolo and SW Mox from NW Mox:

XsGMUMtd8qX54-ggN5MXc_EivSzfYmnpA_9IHlGum_WijUAXEZgkhCeG6CeFCseOEjUS4DpkVpHKT2lidUp9R92uD-iCZzksswE3NfO6xDDdVJZUowDuSrb7SA7uKw

The summit block was steep, but in the time it took for me to consider roping up, Emilio and Adam had soloed half of the route with ice axes in hand. Solid rock led to the summit, where we realized that a West Ridge descent might have been more than bargained for. The choices were steep and intimidating downclimbing or more rappels than we had tat for. We reluctantly returned to the glacier via the North Ridge and stumbled back to camp, out of water and a bit delirious. Returning to the shade and water of camp was a dream, but the mountain continued to provide magic to the evening as a Wolverine appeared over the col just yards from camp and charged past us on the snow, clearly startled by our presence.

Wolverine on Redoubt Glacier:

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By the time I grabbed the camera it was a ways off on the Redoubt glacier, but I feel fortunate to have witnessed it. Likely a once in a lifetime encounter for me.

 

Day 7:

We awoke to zero visibility. The truth is that we really didn’t have plans for the day, so the weather just confirmed that it would be a rest day in camp - washing of clothes and bodies, yoga, and naps.

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Watching the fog ride over the rock and ice of these mountains will always be awe inspiring to me, and the lazy day flew by quicker than most.

 

Day 8:

After a full week of aggressive calorie deficit, I was feeling lean, mean, and ready to climb. We returned through some thick fog, towards the Ridge of Gendarmes, but stopped at an impressive buttress on the subpeak west of NW Mox. 

Trekking through the fog:

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A little break in the fog, revealing the buttress:

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I had seen several references to this buttress being unclimbed, and we gave the weather some time to stir in hopes of making an attempt. A short break in the fog and a glance up the tower was all it took, and we roped up and moved upwards. I led the first pitch, which was primarily 4th class starting at the right base of the buttress and trending left towards the giant flake. 

P1, 4th class up a chossy chimney:

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I brought up Adam and Emilio and then sent upwards again on some steeper climbing. Thankfully the guys had a slight overhang to shield themselves from all the rubble I sent down on them. For about an hour and a half, Adam and Emilio discussed life and risk at the belay as I shouted “rock!” and tried to calm shaking calves. The featured sections I had identified from the ground were typically too loose to be useful, but I was impressed with some fun sections of face climbing that I would call somewhere around 5.8. However, an overhanging section of loose blocks turned me back on my first line. My second choice involved a massive chimney leading far left to the giant flake, but I deemed it unprotectable and not for that day, despite Emilio’s vocal desire to take the lead on it. I worked up again but further to the right sticking more true to the buttress, and this route - despite initially looking the most intimidating - seemed to have the most potential once I was in the thick of it. Again I worked up, 50-100 ft or so, but when I set a nut behind a giant block and the whole thing moved, my remaining stoke for the day was drained. 

Looking up at the second pitch options:
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Emilio on rappel:

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We rappelled back down into the clouds below. Upon reviewing some photos, it appears the steepness of the climbing eases a bit just beyond my high point, and with that knowledge to haunt me, I’m sure we’ll be back to give it another go at some point.

A shot of the buttress taken earlier in the week:

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The remainder of the day included ascending the quicksand up Col of the Wild, and scrambling out of the clouds over Ridge of Gendarmes. Then plunging down the now-much-smaller glacier back to the top of Perry Creek Basin.

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Day 9:

Exiting the long and remote and savage valley was a bit easier than entering it, since we knew what we were up against. We geared up for a long day and plugged away at it. We were surprised to find a jetboil and nalgene perched on a boulder in a talus field, midway down the valley. We certainly didn’t expect to see any signs of recent human activity in the valley, and finding these two items with no other clues left us puzzled. We made note to include it in this trip report to see if we were perhaps not the only party in the Perry Creek valley on 7/3/21. 

An open section in the Perry Creek jungle:

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Mystery Jetboil and Nalgene

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The densest sections of growth towards the bottom of the valley ravaged us as expected, swimming through trees, with many meters of continuous travel without feet contacting ground. Finally -  relief as the forest opened up, we crossed the creek, and met the Little Beaver trail. 

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Walking the maintained trail felt like floating and we were at Ross lake in no time. A boat ride across Ross Lake with beautiful dogs on board, and then, with no time to waste, we hauled up to the car to race into Marblemount before the diner closed.

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Final Thoughts:

I believe a successful trip involves a couple things: coming back in one piece, strengthening the bond between friends, completing some objectives, but also - leaving something to be desired. For every objective I complete in these mountains, I come home with at least a dozen more to add to my list. I cannot unsee the dark and intense north faces of Bear Mountain, and I cannot help but think that if I was just a little stronger - mentally and physically - that we might have seen success on our attempt of that buttress. These thoughts will consume me and drive me to be better until I inevitably return again to test myself. 

 

 


 

Gear Notes:
Light rack and too much rope

Approach Notes:
Type 2 fun

Edited by Jake Johnson
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Quite a trip boys!  Thanks for sharing your adventures!

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Choss-tastic!

Better you than me, I say, better you than me.

Can't wait to read the next chapter.

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Posted (edited)

Hat’s off and great sleuthing, Jake, Adam and Emilio,

Very impressed especially as out-of-WA-staters that you uncovered several significant North Cascades’ firsts on your Chilliwacks’ trip:

·        New approach route to SE Mox up the N lobe of Perry Creek glacier to Col of the Wild. (Our similar 1978 plan to do this was diverted from Perry Creek to Col of Nature when a party member suffered GI distress).

·        First SE Mox to Lemolo RT traverse (and 2A of Lemolo).  (This was our plan in 1982, when a lightning storm came at us over the Northern Pickets forcing retreat from Hard Mox.)

·        Plus first try at the Crazy Crushed Contours Wall on W of NW Mox. Take a look at the wild contours on the map here. 

Edited by John_Roper
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Dayum, your first Cascade trip outside of the Pickets? Thats fuckin hard core.

Can't imagine the motivation needed to attempt a new route (on Mox, no less) after a week in the wilderness. 

 

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Perry Creek.  Damn.  What an entry and exit point.   I been in dees mountains a lot and I don't ever want to go there.  Damn.

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Thanks for the excellent write-up and photos, what a trip. So cool to see a wolverine! Congrats.

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Echo the above, fantastic trip!  Great write-up too.  I'm (eric here) glad my foggy beta might have helped in some small way. I've only seen one wolverine in the Cascades, must have been a powerful moment.

I've also gaped at that wall on the W aspect of NW Mox and wondered -- good on you all for giving it a go.

John, by my read anyway, I'm pretty sure Jake and crew climbed the southern lobe, not the northern one--at least it looks like it in their pics. This was the way that Rolf and I descended. I agree that their approach is a novel one, and a nice way to go when approaching from the US. Perhaps Jake can clarify.

Solid work gents.

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Eric, on second look, I think you’re right.

I lie corrected.

Looks like Doug Leen and Brad Fowler did that south Perry glacier lobe on the 2A of SE Mox in 1968 (27 years after Fred and Helmy).

Silas, Russ, and I repeated it in 1982 (up and down).

Take that north Perry trophy off the shelf, but don’t tell anyone.

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Eric is correct, we approached via the south lobe. Had we known John was giving out trophies for the north lobe, that may have changed the plan 😄 The glacier was in great shape and didn't appear to present much technical challenge. The south lobe was just more gradual and set us up nicely to get directly on SE Mox.

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Impressive; both the trip/climbing and the willingness to suffer!  Love the pic of the "tattered and needle-covered Emilio;" I've felt that way many a time.  Coming home from the Pickets on Monday I called my man, who said "I assume you slayed," and my partner muttered words to the effect that she felt more slain than slayer.

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I can appreciate your experience a bit, despite not having tried the Perry Creek approach.  I attempted the Silver Creek approach last year and turned around at the headwall, thwarted.  In addition to the green hell/schwack we had the pleasure of many hornet stings as our trip was in early September when the queen dies and they become much more aggressive and territorial.

Way to persevere and HTFU for a spectacular experience.  TFPU!

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Wow! What a trip! Impressive and creative way to use your free time together. A Wolverine siting is a blessing and goes to show you how remote that place is. They hate any human presence and will go out of their way to avoid them. 

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Strong work Jake, Adam, and Emilio!

awesome to read your story- we saw your names in the summit registers and also were wondering what your story was. I found this a few months late but posting to solve your jetboil/nalgene mystery. Our party of 5 climbed the moxes, Redoubt, and Spickard via Perry creek basin over ~7 days starting 7/1. We contemplated the northern lobe of the Perry glacier approach but bailed to the Spickard S slopes approach route (via Spickard-Solitude col) after seeing the melted state of the Perry glacier.

THUS, we just missed u - we were sneaking around to Lake Ouzel basin via Spickard slopes (7/2) and climbing Easy mox standard route (7/3) while you were messing around on Crazy Crushed Contours Wall and doing your deproach finding our stashed gear. We brought a 2nd stove in case we needed to split our large party for some reason but decisded to stash in a visible place in the Perry creek basin (here is our TR on nwhikers: http://www.nwhikers.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=8034176)

I am especially impressed that you did the scrambling over the Ridge of Gendarmes twice with overnight packs, and also that you did this in the midst of our heat wave (if my memory is correct). Congrats!

Edited by Ryan Stoddard

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