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JasonG

Doug Walker

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We've lost quite the man. RIP Doug

 

My condolences to your many friends and family.

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More sadness and loss. Thats three experienced middle aged men claimed by the snow in the I-90 corridor in the last few weeks. The most significant commonality is that they all died with no one around them, alone. Stay together folks and have an agreed upon plan for a rendezvous point (especially in the cold winter) in case a separation does occur, snowshoeing, skiing, whatever. I am by no means judging the man nor his groups' decisions because I was not there, and I have done similar things myself. Hopefully this is the last death for a long while. RIP Doug.

Edited by SemoreJugs

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Truly a great loss - my condolences, Mother Nature is sometimes not very fair. RIP Doug, God Bless.

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....and former Board member of REI, etc., etc.

 

But for any of you that knew or crossed paths with Doug, he was first and foremost the most energetic member of just about any outing. His enthusiasm was contagious and will be sorely missed.

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Got off at exit 47 yesterday, not knowing there was a mountain rescue going on. I've been up and down Granite Mountain probably 50-75 times. Many times in winter on and off skis. It has a reputation and those that have spent much time there know it's foreshortened view from the highway does not do justice to the vertical it contains. The genuine peace and solitude it produces as merely 2 miles up the trail, the sound of corrosive I-90 disappear, and the mystical feeling of a large and powerful presence envelop you. It's a relatively steep and simultaneously straightforward formula, but there are tricks to getting up and down in winter. Stay out of the gully, off the steep open slopes, wander thru the steep forest, make a break for the seemingly wind blown finger, move quickly. Ignore the burn in your legs as it feels like a real mountain, and has proven itself time and time again to be a dangerous place at certain times. I've witnessed several rescues there. It wasn't that long ago when these were small intimate affairs, shared by few. Yesterday was a huge show. A lot of presence. An important man in that community lost his life, in a place where you venture to enjoy something so close to man, that in a few steps can take you so far away. Yesterday a man was taken by the mystical force that imbues the higher places - a small whisper of snow, a slight movement under foot, and that small place in your mind simultaneously decries belief and acceptance. "I died here today, this is how I died". And you listen to the soft surf sounds of snow glide overhead as the cold quicksand pulls you under. Blue skies fallen climber..

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I heard second hand that there were "40-50 mph" winds on Granite near the time of the avalanche, which would easily build windslabs pretty quickly.

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Got off at exit 47 yesterday, not knowing there was a mountain rescue going on. I've been up and down Granite Mountain probably 50-75 times. Many times in winter on and off skis. It has a reputation and those that have spent much time there know it's foreshortened view from the highway does not do justice to the vertical it contains. The genuine peace and solitude it produces as merely 2 miles up the trail, the sound of corrosive I-90 disappear, and the mystical feeling of a large and powerful presence envelop you. It's a relatively steep and simultaneously straightforward formula, but there are tricks to getting up and down in winter. Stay out of the gully, off the steep open slopes, wander thru the steep forest, make a break for the seemingly wind blown finger, move quickly. Ignore the burn in your legs as it feels like a real mountain, and has proven itself time and time again to be a dangerous place at certain times. I've witnessed several rescues there. It wasn't that long ago when these were small intimate affairs, shared by few. Yesterday was a huge show. A lot of presence. An important man in that community lost his life, in a place where you venture to enjoy something so close to man, that in a few steps can take you so far away. Yesterday a man was taken by the mystical force that imbues the higher places - a small whisper of snow, a slight movement under foot, and that small place in your mind simultaneously decries belief and acceptance. "I died here today, this is how I died". And you listen to the soft surf sounds of snow glide overhead as the cold quicksand pulls you under. Blue skies fallen climber..

 

As usual, your writing is eerily relatable and spot on. It's been a long time, hope to see more of it around here.

 

Condolences to Doug's family, friends and climbing partners, by all accounts, he was a force to be reckoned with.

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Never met the man but it sounds like we lost a true saint of a man.

 

It is a dangerous game of roulette that anyone who sets foot on a snow slope. You can have all the avalanche training, snow experience and detailed game plans to minimize the exposure but the reality is that if you are going up a snow slope, there is a risk that the it could come down. You play the game long enough and your time will come. It is simple probability.

If you manage to make a long career of walking up snow in the winter and not be a part of an avalanche, either as a victim nor as a rescuer, then you are truly a gifted person and should have been doing the lottery all along.

Every time we set foot on a slope, we play with a game of Russian roulette with a 1000 round barrel with one bullet in a chamber. Sure the chances are good but someday, our time will come. good thing that the game is worth every risk we take.

 

RIP Doug and condelances to friends and family.

 

 

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I heard second hand that there were "40-50 mph" winds on Granite near the time of the avalanche, which would easily build windslabs pretty quickly.

 

On the 1st while driving to Snoqualmie Pass you could see snow plumes blowing off all the peaks west of the pass. We ended up skiing on the north side of Kendall. Snow conditions included pockets of wind packed powder along with the unpacked variety.

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We have been Granite Mountain a couple times. The last time was a hike on Christmas. January 1st, Friday, we drove to east for hex mountain snow shoeing, and we were talking about Granite mountain, but did not know there was a rescue either. I do wish he would not have gone there when the avalanche was predicted as moderate at Granite. RIP. Your legacy will be memorized and talked by more and more avid climbers in your community.

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Not the climber's memorial, but should be good nonetheless:

 

Doug Walker Celebration of Life

 

Friday, January 29, 2016

Benaroya Hall (downtown Seattle, 200 University St, Seattle, WA 98101)

 

5:00 pm to 8:30 pm

 

The program will begin at 6:00 pm.

 

Reception to follow.

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indeed, and as an old-fat phuck meself, i can't help but ask: what's wrong w/ a would-be mountain climber that he can't walk up a couple thousand feet of groomed track? :crazy:

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Dude can ride a snowcat, or post about a snowcat, all he wants.... but a memorial thread for a dead guy ain't the place to do it.

 

Simple noob technical error, I'm sure.

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OK, back to the subject at hand.

 

We miss you Doug!

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