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Grizzlies to eat hippies and other unwanted


num1mc

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I spent a few years working in the woods of AK and MT and had a fair number of unpleasant grizzly/brown bear encounters, a friend mauled, etc. Near as I can tell, their scientific name is pretty much spot on. I can't say I'm a fan of the reintroduction efforts.

 

Although I'm sure it would add to the excitement of alpine climbing in the North Cascades.

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I'm not a fan of bringing them back to the North Cascades; their presence in Wyoming and Canada has been a big reason I have not done much in those areas during the summer months. It will be interesting to see how this thing plays out over the next several years, and hopefully their option of no action prevails.

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I'm not a fan of bringing them back to the North Cascades; their presence in Wyoming and Canada has been a big reason I have not done much in those areas during the summer months. It will be interesting to see how this thing plays out over the next several years, and hopefully their option of no action prevails.

 

Thanks for keeping Wyoming's awesome routes less crowded for guys like me!

 

While bears are a common sight in the Tetons (no big) - it's pretty rare to see one in the Cirque and other more frequented areas of the Winds.

 

Me? I'm a bit more concerned with dangers I actually have to face there. Like lighting, for example.

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Every other danger is more real, but one bad experience with a bear has resulted in a horrible phobia that simply doesn't come into play here in PNW because there are so very few of them. I'm not a fan of ridding them off, but here where they aren't preveleant and haven't been for many years (if ever) it seems against nature to bring them back in - especially when they are doing well at other areas. Let's face it, the Wyoming and Canadian bears are in not in any danger of loosing population anymore - why attempt to establish a population that was not ever largely established and that was not lost due to human encroachment.

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Dave-

 

There were quite a few grizzlies out here before we shot them all. Read the journals of Lewis and Clark, or talk to the area tribes.

 

http://westernwildlife.org/grizzly-bear-outreach-project/history/

 

But I'm a selfish bastard, and prefer dealing with the much more predictable black bears.

 

Jason - Good info, thanks. I didn't realize the extent that they were previously here in the PNW pre-1950. I knew they were here, and to some extent still are, but I was making my references to the last 50 or so years where they have very low populations, and didn't receive the publicity and population recovery of the Canadian Rockies and Yellowstone region (TONS of books about those regions and the bear recovery/attack aspects).

 

Again, it will be interesting to see the direction the government agencies decide to go when it's time for them to make a decision.

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But, but...... those bear canisters are so unwieldy!

 

shiiiit, far easier to put yer partners nasty climbing shoes in w/ the food n' leave the can at home - ain't no animal alive nasty enough to want to get a piece of mine or most of my people's feet :)

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