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olemissrebel

Using a bivvy instead of tent on Rainier?

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I have the Black Diamond Lightsabre bivvy sack. Would it be acceptable to use this instead of a tent on the Ingraham/DC route for a June 12th climb? We're planning to camp on the Muir snowfield or Camp Muir and another night at Ingraham Flats. My other option is a 10lb 4 season tent (North Face 25).

 

Thanks,

Shawn

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Well, I did a little research and found that under Title 12 of the Rainier Climbing Code, under section 5.3 "sleeping", subsection A "tents", stated the following:

 

All permit holders must sleep inside an approved shelter device consisting of walls made of nanotech, rayonlect, or potatosack material.

 

Material must be within UAIISA guidelines determining thickness, snore-resistance and whitegas flashpoint.

 

Unapproved shelter devices can submit a waiver by writing no less than 18 business days before the date of the climb, unless the date of the climb is a Thursday, then the waiver must be received 19 business days prior.

 

 

I hope this helps.

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My buddy used a bivy on a ski attempt of the Emmons this past weekend. He dug a snow cave at camp Sherman. Blowing snow was such an issue that night, that he kept getting buried and we had to keep digging him out. His sleeping bag got so wet that another night out was out of the question. I don't really use bivys, but my guess is you will be fine if the weather is good. Otherwise, it could be fairly miserable. If you're just going up to camp Muir, my suggestion would be to lug the tent. Its not too bad of an approach.

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Well, I did a little research and found that under Title 12 of the Rainier Climbing Code, under section 5.3 "sleeping", subsection A "tents", stated the following:

 

All permit holders must sleep inside an approved shelter device consisting of walls made of nanotech, rayonlect, or potatosack material.

 

Material must be within UAIISA guidelines determining thickness, snore-resistance and whitegas flashpoint.

 

Unapproved shelter devices can submit a waiver by writing no less than 18 business days before the date of the climb, unless the date of the climb is a Thursday, then the waiver must be received 19 business days prior.

 

 

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA ....

 

If going to Muir a bivy sac is fine - but IMHO only because if the weather is shitty you can utilize the public shelter. In general, for the Cascade peaks where one can not easily descend when a storm hits I prefer a tent. The reason being is that Cascade storms are wet. So if caught out your outer gear is wet and then climbing into a bivy sac with wet gear it just stays wet. At least with a tent you crawl in take the wet stuff off, fire up a stove, get a brew, and dry out a bit.

 

BTW - After doing Curtis Ridge we ran into a party of four coming from Liberty. Cause of the weather we all holed up. We all crawled into our tents and were waiting it out. About an hour later a group 3 came along with bivy sacs two of them ended up in tents cause of exactly what I described above.

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I have the Black Diamond Lightsabre bivvy sack. Would it be acceptable to use this instead of a tent on the Ingraham/DC route for a June 12th climb? We're planning to camp on the Muir snowfield or Camp Muir and another night at Ingraham Flats. My other option is a 10lb 4 season tent (North Face 25).

 

Thanks,

Shawn

 

good question - we were thinking the same for about a week after you. maybe time to rethink. would prefer to leave the tent at home, but still have the flexibility of not bunking at muir. my walrus weighs in around 10#'s too. split between two people and subtracting the weight of the bivys it's only about 3#'s extra each, but that's adding close to 10% of my pack weight.

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It can get really ugly. We don't get out new doppler radar for weather until 2012. You can always use your pack as a bivy sack in an emergency but tents are so light these days.

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Cool. From what I've heard, the doppler will give us a much larger safety cushion for our alpine adventures.

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My other option is a 10lb 4 season tent (North Face 25).

 

Doesn't sound like much of an option to me.

 

Bivies are great on Rainier..... in decent weather. If the weather is crappy enough to make your night in the bivy miserable, its crappy enough to make your climb miserable.

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Depends on the forecast. I used a bivy on Liberty Ridge, but that involves a carry-over and the forecast was stellar. All other trips on the mountain I have used a tent.

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what they said - bivy if good weather, tent of whatever weight if shitty (but if shitty, why you going? :) )

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meh- with that logic if you are going for Rainier and are a reasonable person you should bivy. That is pretty subjective in my opinion. Some people don't like to bivy. I'm one of em.

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meh- with that logic if you are going for Rainier and are a reasonable person you should bivy. That is pretty subjective in my opinion. Some people don't like to bivy. I'm one of em.

i have a clear conscience, so sleep well in a bivy sack in all conditions 'cept the shitty - a huge mtn, the less shit you carry at all times the better you feel, so always go light as possible, 'long as doing so don't get you the chop (but still don't skimp on the booze n' whatnot) :)

 

if you're doing a carryover, by far the coolest way to do a giant hill, this rule is doubly so.

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How could I argue with the Ivan?

nice - gonna have to get my wife on that band-wagon - at the mometn she hangs up on any low-life so imbecilic to call up the house n' ask for ivan :)

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Get a $19 Wal-Mart puptent, ditch the stakes and poles and take that along with your BD bivy.

 

You'll only be a few pounds heavier, and if it doesn't work out, you can throw tent into a crevass.

 

Concept is cheap version of MEC's guidesack thing.

 

I get paid $2.50 for every time I say this.

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I'd find/rent a lighter tent for DC. Or better yet talk your buddies into packing it. I already know I'm a pussy. But you can use a lighter bag in a tent.

 

Bivy sac, "if you're doing a carryover, by far the coolest way to do a giant hill" Ivan is, like soooooooo toooo cool :)

 

 

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Bivy sac, "if you're doing a carryover, by far the coolest way to do a giant hill" Ivan is, like soooooooo toooo cool :)

 

more like ragingly outta shape and desperately trying not to carry a dumptser of horseshit up the hill in order to prevent The Big Sitdown - i earned my seige-tactic mountaineering badge on mckinley and its certainly fun, but 'round here i'd much rather have it over and done w/ quick as can be w/o feeling like the mtn god raped the shit out of my poor corn-hole :)

 

pretty sure you've climbing the big-beer wand a # of times more than simple me!

 

if i had a nice light bibler i'd certinaly bring that instead

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I'm a weight fanatic only because I am so freak'in fat and let's face it, old. I'm OK suffering more if I can carry less. Good bivy isn't suffering much. So far I haven't frozen anything drastic or really important. (wind briefs are important) If I have to carry it very far, I don't want to carry much :)

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Yes Bibler-type tent is far preferable, but assuming biv sack is also used, the $19 Wenzel might be plausible substitute at similar weight in up to moderately poor conditions.

 

Another $2.50

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BD first light. fits 3 very clsoe friends a little snug, 2.5# and will shake off any storm at least a time or two. I got mine on sale over the internet for $129.

 

I never use my Bibler now, saving it for something big...besides just me ;)

 

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Lots of good tents weight little more than two bivvy sacs and would much better serve you than the two sacs. If the only tent you can get your hands on weights too much I would still consider bringing it because even in fair weather the winds at your high camp can be atrocious.

 

Off topic but I think that carrying over is in some respects a less advisable plan when it comes to the much celebrated Liberty Ridge route on Mt. Rainier and in many cases a demonstration of unfitness for the objective. If you are not comfortable climbing DOWN the route what business do you have trying to climb UP it? Climbers have died thinking that their only route of escape was up-and-over.

 

I realize that I may express an unpopular viewpoint on this but I think the cautious climber should carry what they might need to a high camp and plan to climb up and back to that camp, then descend. Yes, a summit bivvy may be really cool and a carry-over may be exciting, but as a general rule I think most climbers will do better with a "standard" approach.

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