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SnowRunner

Avalanche on Rainier?

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Well, not exactly. For one thing, a climb isn't a marathon. Although they are close. But definitely take it easy. But you make some valid points about preparation.

"Also, why even say anything? Nobody was asking for your expert nutrition and training advice, he was just commenting that the crappy weather has prevented him from going out on his training climbs and you butt in with your wanna-be-Mr-Big-Time-Mountaineer attitude and your unsolicited advice that makes you come off like a total douche."

That's funny coming from you. Why the hell are you talking to me? Did I ask you to? It can be turned around. In fact, pretty much all you do on this site is critique other people. I've never heard you say anything of value. It's funny on this site because the guys calling other people douches are usually the douchiest.

Edited by summitchaserCJB

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I couldn't care less who the douchiest people of cascade climbers are.

 

I'm heading out to Rainier next week. If anyone has some firsthand info on weather/avi conditions I love to hear it, even from the douches. ;)

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That's funny coming from you. Why the hell are you talking to me? Did I ask you to? It can be turned around. In fact, pretty much all you do on this site is critique other people. I've never heard you say anything of value. It's funny on this site because the guys calling other people douches are usually the douchiest.

 

The Drama Queens of cc.com.

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Dane, thanks for the the report, I agree on the conditions and have seen lots of instability on Hood. Got turned back at upper triangle this w/e, low vis, winds and snow but the big issue was a CT13 Q2 at 12 inches and a CT21 Q2 at 30 inches, SE Facing on 28 degrees, repeatable, also breakable crust from 6 to knee deep. I expect similar readings on Rainier. Was hoping to climb later this week but my plans are a changing.

 

 

 

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Well, not exactly. For one thing, a climb isn't a marathon. Although they are close. But definitely take it easy. But you make some valid points about preparation.

"Also, why even say anything? Nobody was asking for your expert nutrition and training advice, he was just commenting that the crappy weather has prevented him from going out on his training climbs and you butt in with your wanna-be-Mr-Big-Time-Mountaineer attitude and your unsolicited advice that makes you come off like a total douche."

That's funny coming from you. Why the hell are you talking to me? Did I ask you to? It can be turned around. In fact, pretty much all you do on this site is critique other people. I've never heard you say anything of value. It's funny on this site because the guys calling other people douches are usually the douchiest.

whoa, wait a minute, chaser... so you mean that you have examined all of rob's 3990+ posts dating back to july 27th 2006 and he has NEVER said anything of value? what is it you do for work, dude? it sounds like you have a lot of free time with which you ought to climb a bit more rather than waste it going off-topic on threads here, eh? :)

 

 

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Three of us made an attempt to ski the Emmons Glacier this past weekend. We started our approach on Thursday (27th) afternoon. The road to white river campground is now open. The glacier basin trail is a mix of snow, bare trail, and stream crossings right now. We didn't have much trouble with postholing on our way to the basin. Getting up the Inter-Glacier on Friday was fine with skis, but it looked like slow going for other parties without flotation. Visibility was terrible for us and we relied solely on a map and compass. We saw signs of wet sloughs on many of the steeper slopes, and although I was always concerned about how warm it was, nothing we were on ever gave any indication that it might slide. We experienced high winds at camp Sherman and had some major issues with wind loading. Our buddy was in a small bivy in a snow cave and each time we got up to shovel out our tent we'd realize that he was buried again and have to shovel him out as well. In the morning (Saturday), everything was wet, the winds had worsened, and visibility was only marginally better, so we decided to retreat. We caught glimpses of the upper route here and there and it looked like an incredible ski, if only you could see where the hell you were going to avoid crevasses. Our ski descent from the camp Sherman was great at first, but then we quickly ran into more whiteout conditions and vertigo set in pretty bad. We heard Sunday had a short weather window in the morning, but that the forecast had also worsened from it once sunny prediction. I'm curious to know if anybody had summited from the Emmons on Sunday?

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For all the newer climbers out there, climbing is not like a marathon at all imo sorry. In fact some of my most difficult clients are marathon runners who cant seem to pace themselves to anything after 7 hours, most climbs last 7 - 12. Its been my experience that hiking up to the day of the climb is fine and awesome. For climbers trying to get fit, hiking and especially cycling seem to work best....but this is only my opinion, different body types need different workout routines. I have seen a off the couch client summit Baker after working out everyday for 2 weeks right up to the climb.

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When were you doing the conditioning climbs? Generally it's accepted that anything sooner than 2 weeks before the climb doesn't strengthen you.

 

We have had climbs planned for the last 3 months. Not sure where you got the 2 week timetable. Have had no luck with weather and avalanche conditions this spring at all. Even with that, conditions on Rainier are not good on pretty much any route, let alone a steep S facing one!

 

 

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Man! I had no idea that my short 'throwaway' comment would elicit such a slugfest!

 

 

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Agreed on the marathon. No comparison to climbing Rainier fwiw.

 

Nutrition, hydration requirements and time frames are totally different. A 6.5 hr marathon isn't particularly fast @ 15 min/miles. Few will do any route on Rainier in 6.5 hrs rt.

 

Taper time (if required at all) and time frames from the event are defined by the length of the event and what pace you adopt for that particular event.

 

Anyone doing Marathons, 1/2 IMs or a full IM will quickly tell you that the distances aren't hard with a good training base. The nutrition is what is hard at race pace for the extended time frames jumping from a 1/2 IM or marathon time frames (roughly compariable) to a full Iron Man (dbl the time frames) .

 

None but the most elite climbers will push anywhere close to a "race pace" in the mtns so nutrition/hydration aren't such critical issues. Mess up either in a IM and you'll be left puking or shitting your guts out along the run of an IM. Mess up either or both on Rainier and most will likely get to the summit and down with very minor ill effects.

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I've done a marathon and half IM. 4 hour marathon, 5 hour 25 minutes half ironman. So, I donno, I guess I'd say they do transfer. Not as perfectly as say, bike racing just because of the benefits to leg strength. Both distances are attainable for mortals with a good amount of training, inherent fitness, and a whole lot of will.

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We have had climbs planned for the last 3 months. Not sure where you got the 2 week timetable. Have had no luck with weather and avalanche conditions this spring at all. Even with that, conditions on Rainier are not good on pretty much any route, let alone a steep S facing one!

 

 

Really? We found great conditions this weekend

 

We knew we were running a risk of going up there with conditions, weather etc, but we talked to rangers guides and did our own analysis. Things turned out great, we nailed the weather window. If you are dead set in your plans to climb rainier and have an opportunity in weather/conditions, I'd say its worth checking out as long as you are comfortable in your skills/ability to get up and down and get out as needed.

 

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We have had climbs planned for the last 3 months. Not sure where you got the 2 week timetable. Have had no luck with weather and avalanche conditions this spring at all. Even with that, conditions on Rainier are not good on pretty much any route, let alone a steep S facing one!

 

 

Really? We found great conditions this weekend

 

We knew we were running a risk of going up there with conditions, weather etc, but we talked to rangers guides and did our own analysis. Things turned out great, we nailed the weather window. If you are dead set in your plans to climb rainier and have an opportunity in weather/conditions, I'd say its worth checking out as long as you are comfortable in your skills/ability to get up and down and get out as needed.

 

Fine conditions for a standard route, but not what I want to deal with on a headwall thank you very much! :)

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My friend was supposed to climb Rainier at the end of this month. He told me there was an avalanche that killed two climbers around the end of May 2010. However, I can't find any news articles/ reports that this ever happened. Does anyone know of such an incident, or did my friend make up a story because his climb got cancelled? Thanks

 

Did not hear about that one. But sounds like your friends story true or not just came true today with. http://www.komonews.com/news/local/95695844.html

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Sad day, hope things improve within the next few weeks, we're heading up from TX to do the ID/DC route (depending on what's in shape) However, if conditions aren't ideal, I hvae no problem just hanging around Muir and doing day hikes.

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Day Hikes? Did you see the run out of that avalanche and the elevations? Even day hikes aren't the best idea right now imo.

Hopefully all that will change in a few weeks but right now? Not a good idea.

 

"forecast is for worsening weather, with a high avalanche danger, and that there may be little or no opportunity to resume the search on Sunday. 6/6/10"

 

It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out the first nice day after a storm cycle isn't the day to be on the mtn. There are avi terrain traps all over the place on Rainier at at all elevations. It doesn't take a monster to bury you.

 

Today, was the 1st day in over a week it hasn't stormed on Rainier and rained heavily, then snowed pretty low into the Cascades.

 

Only 2 injured and one likely dead out of 11. Not bad, as most of them were lucky. But, what a fucking waste.

 

 

 

 

 

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I hope that soloist told someone he was soloing Rainier....but since he didn't register most likely he told no one....sad if he has a family. Crappy thing.....

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Just got back from Rainier. The mountain is in horrible shape. Spent thrusday night at Muir in 60+ winds, woke up friday morning around 6am to the same thing. Cleared up around noon and started to head down. first 1500 feet was icy and not too bad, then the rest was whiteout. Not sure why anyone would have attempted to summit on friday night/saturday morning. There was a weather break but everything was way to snow loaded to even attempt.

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Things change quickly around the Cascades by the day let alone the week or the month. It is always all about the current conditions in the mountains.

 

Yesterday's avi. path.

 

100605_rainier_snowslide.jpg

 

 

Which is also Kevin's route last month.

27981_571685525853_39203244_33308365_4923969_n.jpg

 

 

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