Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
ChrisL

WTB: Lots of stuff

Recommended Posts

I am only looking for stuff that is in VERY good condition, with no signs of wear and tear.

 

I can't give exact sizes on this, but give me what size you have and I will look up the info for each company's sizing. I'm about 5'9, 140lbs, 9 shoes size, and around a 30-32 waist. If you have anything thats wayyy off that, don't bother.

 

5000 cu or more internal frame backpack

Double plastic boots

Sleeping bag (rated to 0º F or lower, no short bags)

Sleeping pad

Parka

Shell jacket

fleece jacket/pants

Gaiters

Headlamp

carabiners and other climbing hardware

Ice axe(s)

crampons

 

If you can't tell, it will be my first time climbing in the next few months smile.gif

 

Thanks!

Edited by ChrisL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

You are going to climb Rainier right?

 

Assuming you are going to be climbing in May/June, you won't need most of that really warm stuff (fleece pants, 0deg bag, big down parka) and you'll probably be happier with lighterweight stuff like leather boots instead of plastics and alluminum vs. steel crampons, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure if I'm going up with RMI or not, but that's their requirements as far as gear, so I better get it all just incase, dont wanna be left behind cause i didn't bring something heheh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ChrisL,

 

Seriously, listen to Mr. Al Pinfox.

 

4,000 cu in pack MAX.

20 degree sleeping bag

lightly insulated leather boots

no fleece

Marmot Precip Jacket (or similar)

light Scholler pants

synthetic parka (Whild Things EP or similar)

 

Cheaper, lighter, more versatile. You mentioned you are in school. This summer do this: road trip to Seattle with no gear. Go to Second Ascent, buy everything you need at probably half of what you would pay retail. Go on a climbing binge. Go home with a trunk full of gear and a head full of great memories. Next school year dream of coming back to Washington. Come back year after year. Graduate from college and become mountain guide. Piss off your parents who will feel they wasted their money on your education. Live a happy life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RMI only recommends a 5,000 cubic inch backpack? After passing enough of their ant trains I would have guessed they recommended 7,000. Ooops, my fault, the post says "5,000 or more..." pitty.gif

 

I second the advice offered above. Bring less, climb more. You improve your chances of enjoying the climb if you carry less than 35 pounds up to Muir.

 

But if you want some gear, I have some very nice, barely used, Black Diamond Airlock screwgate carabiners I would sell you. Send a personal message if you are interested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris:

 

If you are climbing with RMI, you'd better have the gear they list. They are pretty strict about it and may leave you in the parking lot if you don't. I climbed Rainier with them a few years ago and have a parka, pack and sleeping bag that would work for you.

 

If you are interested, send me an email. ryan@rpmcousa.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an Arcteryx Beta jacket in men's size medium that I am looking to sell. Retails for $365, and this one has never been used (tags still on). I am willing to negotiate a sale...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are climbing with RMI, you'd better have the gear they list. They are pretty strict about it and may leave you in the parking lot if you don't.

 

wazzup.gif

 

Man, that would SUCK! Knowing that, I would show up with the gear having climbed to the moon on the stairmaster, drag a hefty pack up to Muir, then try to lighten my summit pack as much as possible.

 

It seems that every time I return to Muir I meet some group who turned back for some physical reason (fitness, altitude, etc.) that is wearing huge packs.

 

fruit.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fromage:

 

I think they weed out some pussies on the way to Muir by making them haul huge packs. I was the only person in the group who wore leather boots. They will make exceptions, but, you'd better have a good reason. I argued my feet were super wide and none of their rentals would fit me. It was interesting that there were people in my group who were from Arizona in plastic boots, Super dooper down parkas and full on goretex bibs who were "freezin!" in 30 degree temps. I was like "whatever, we're on Mt. Rainier, duuhh".

 

Chris - I'll make you a package deal for an Eddie Bauer Down Parka, Eddie Bauer Goretex parka, Kelty 0 degree mummy bag and a Lowe Alpine Crossbow 90 backpack. All lightly used and in excellent condition. Send me a PM or email if you're interested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the parka, pants, and glasses.

Still looking for a lot of stuff!

 

Can anyone reccomend good boots/crampons/ice axe ? All will be used for mountaineering and a bit of ice. I'd like to have something that works good for both.

Edited by ChrisL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got fleece tops and bottoms if you still want those?

 

As for axe, you'll probably want your basic glacier axe which obviously wont be geared for waterfall ice. Then again, I dont think you'd want to carry a relatively heavy technical ice tool on rainer either, but who am I to say? smile.gif

 

Same things with crampons, you'll have to make a sacrifice one way or another. technical crampons with vertical front points often use a vertical rail front piece (tho I have seen those that dont, such as BD bionic which is sometimes called a cookie cutter. They snowball up pretty easily compared with a flat front piece crampon. If I was going to get one pair of crampons for everything I would get something with vertical front points and a flat front piece, such as the BD bionic I mentioned. I have no idea if that is a good crampon or not, I am just using it as an example.

 

For boots, I would look seriously at leather boots. Leathers climb ice better and are warm enough for rainer (IMHO) in all but the coldest times of winter. There are some plastics that climb ice very well, but I would prefer leathers overall. I've never climbed a volcano around here (or any glacier for that matter) in anything but leather boots, save my ski boots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, a lot of people have told me to go for leather boots for rainier. Unfortunatly it looks like I may be going up with RMI and they absolutely positively require plastic boots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
as for ice axe, I love my BD Raven. Simple, comfortable, relatively inexpensive. I feel it's a great all-around axe.

 

But the raven won't help you in ice or even really hard snow. That pick just plain sucks. For cheap usable axe check out the Grivel Pamir. Weighs a little more than a BD Raven, bu tthe pick is functional.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RMI does not require anything, and won't refuse someone because they choose to ignore advice from a group that has thirty years of experience guiding on the Rainier. RMI has had people climb with frame packs, leather boots, and without down parkas.

RMI recommends this gear because they will continue a climb is some of the worst weather. When I climb for fun, I use leather boots, a small pack, and carry the minimal amount of clothes possible, and I turn around if weather exceeds my gear. RMI recommends plastic boots, a larger pack, and a few more clothes in order to increase their chances of summitting in adverse conditions.

If this is your first experience, or if your unsure about your future climbing bigger mountains, then I recommend renting anything you don't already own. That way you can make a more educated decision if you decide to purchase something later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Straight from their website -

"Each individual participating on a summit climb or seminar MUST have the mountaineering equipment and miscellaneous items listed below. Do not jeopardize your safety, comfort or success - bring every item."

 

The person I talked to at RMI also said I will be left behind if I did not bring exactly what was on the list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
as for ice axe, I love my BD Raven. Simple, comfortable, relatively inexpensive. I feel it's a great all-around axe.

 

But the raven won't help you in ice or even really hard snow. That pick just plain sucks. For cheap usable axe check out the Grivel Pamir. Weighs a little more than a BD Raven, bu tthe pick is functional.

 

Now I'm thoroughly confused. I've used my raven in hard snow and ice and it's worked just fine. I don't know where you're getting your information, but perhaps you should consider another source.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
as for ice axe, I love my BD Raven. Simple, comfortable, relatively inexpensive. I feel it's a great all-around axe.

 

But the raven won't help you in ice or even really hard snow. That pick just plain sucks. For cheap usable axe check out the Grivel Pamir. Weighs a little more than a BD Raven, bu tthe pick is functional.

 

Now I'm thoroughly confused. I've used my raven in hard snow and ice and it's worked just fine. I don't know where you're getting your information, but perhaps you should consider another source.

 

I have found that my own experience is pretty reliable

-<shrug>- Myabe I will try being someone else for a while...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But the raven won't help you in ice or even really hard snow. That pick just plain sucks. For cheap usable axe check out the Grivel Pamir. Weighs a little more than a BD Raven, bu tthe pick is functional.

This actually depends on which Raven you buy. Black Diamond changed the pick on the Raven about two years ago. Initially the Raven had a positive clearance pick. BD later switched a neutral-clearance pick, which is a lot better for ice climbing. I upgraded to one with a neutral-clearance pick, and it works really well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ChrisL,

 

A couple of comments about RMI. I've done two trips with them (including a week-long seminar), and another trip with a senior RMI guide, so I can speak from some experience. Weight is really a concern, with the expedition seminar. You'll have more fun if you can keep your pack weight down.

 

RMI does do a "gear check", in which they will ask you to spread out your gear in a big pile. With 24 clients each making gear piles, the 6 guides do not have the time (or the desire) to systematically go through each piece of gear. Mostly the guide will just ask you "did you bring X", or "did you bring Y". It's mostly the "honor system". The guides are mostly looking to spot serious deficiencies in client's gear, before they get to the upper mountain. The point is not to have it be a military-style inspection.

 

In my opinion, the number 1 mistake that RMI clients make is that they bring too much stuff, or too heavy stuff.

Some ways you could still save weight, and not run afoul of the rules are:

 

(1) No one is going to measure the volume of your pack, to see if it is exactly 5000 cu in. You could easily go with a 4000 cu in pack, without a frame. Make sure it has an extendable collar. It will probably save you close to a pound. This presumes you have a down sleeping bag, which will compress really well and allow you to minimize pack size. Ideally, your pack will have removable padding.

 

(2) No one is going to check whether your sleeping bag is rated to 0F or 15F. You could save weight on the sleeping bag (probably four ounces, if you are going with down), and still be quite toasty. You will have tons of warm clothes to sleep in, and a parka to layer over your sleeping bag. Make sure the sleeping bag is no longer than it absolutely needs to be (given your height), which might also save some weight.

 

(3) You can go with a 3/4 length ridge-rest pad. This will save a bit of weight, as compared to a full-length ridge-rest pad. Make up the difference by sleeping on the rope, or on your pack (which will hopefully have removable padding).

 

(4) For the shell pants and jacket: Heavy 3-ply Gore-Tex is not really necessary. There are lighter shells on the market. I bought heavy gore-tex pants and jacket for a Rainier trip, and they have stayed in my closet ever since. Something like Marmot Pre Cip is just perfect for Rainier, and significantly lighter than Gore-Tex. RMI recommends (but does not require) full side zips for the pants, but this is just needless extra weight. Going with lightweight Pre Cip pants and jacket could save you as much as 6 ounces.

 

(5) Parka: this is ABSOLUTELY NOT the place to save weight. Go with something burly. RMI takes fairly long breaks on summit day, because it takes a while to coil in six rope teams that are spread out over a quarter-mile. Then they may be switching around rope teams and so forth, at the break. The result is that you may be sitting in the freezing cold and wind for 15 minutes or so while the guides deal with logistics and rope-team management. A burly parka will really help. Make sure it has an insulated hood that can fit over your helmet. For Rainier I'd go with down, because it is lighter weight, and compresses well (which saves volume in your pack). But synthetic (e.g., Wild Things Belay Jacket) would be fine also. Don't go skinny on the parka, unless you have done some winter climbing in other mountain ranges, and are sure you will not get cold.

 

(6) Boots: Don't rock the boat-- go with plastics. Leathers have their place, but for a first-timer going with RMI, plastics are the way to go. See if you can rent some Scarpa Alphas here in Seattle-- they are pretty lightweight.

 

(7) Go fairly lightweight on the axe. Raven Pro or Grivel Air Tech (or whatever it is called). Do NOT bring one of the heavy old SMC axes that REI used to sell.

 

(8) Crampons: For the RMI expedition seminar, I'd recommend against aluminum. You may be doing some serac ice climbing on non-summit days, as well as climbing through class 2-3 rock sections on summit day (e.g., Cathedral Rocks, and Disappointment Cleaver in late season). RMI requires the clients to keep the crampons on through Cathedral Rocks. Steel crampons would be the better choice for this trip. Check out the Grivel G12 crampon, it is pretty lightweight and a very good all-around climber. BD Contact Crampon or Sabertooth would be OK as well.

 

(9) Headlamp: I recommend an ultralight LED headlamp, like the Tikka Plus. On the RMI expedition seminar, you will not need to be doing any tricky routefinding in the dark - that's what you are paying the guides for. The guides are mostly concerned with efficiently moving the clients up the mountain, so it is highly unlikely you will be called upon to scout the way through a crevasse field by yourself, in the dark. So you won't be needing the powerful incandescent headlamp with the heavy 4.5V battery (e.g., Petzl Zoom).

 

(10) Don't bring any extra stuff. You know, the little goodies that seem like they might be useful: multi-tool, mechanical ascenders, ice screws, etc. Stick with what is on the required list.

 

Well, those are just my unsolicited opinions about gear for RMI trips. Have fun! wave.gif

Edited by Stephen_Ramsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×