Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
rock-ice

Wonderland Trail 48hrs

Recommended Posts

I know its not climbing, but for the past six or seven months I've been working up to and planning a speed hike around the wonderland. At first I thought about 24 hrs but realized that might be too ambitious for my first time around all at one time. And besides this way its easier to drag someone else along. Anyways I was looking for any lightweight water (filtration) and food tidbits. Has anyone else done this trip or others like it. Any advice would be great. thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iodine. Isn't the wonderland trail 90 miles?? bigdrink.gif

A friend of mine just did a section to indian henry's, and around those parts. Plenty of water for cooking dehydrated foods(obviously). Nice glacial run-off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

93 miles in 24 hrs? That's beyond ambitious! That's super human! 48 hrs doesn't sound any more reasonable. hahaha.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rock-ice said:I was looking for any lightweight water (filtration) and food tidbits.

 

Use the water from the drinking fountains at Narada Falls, Paradise, Sunrise, and White River.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A guy that used to post here named Brian Haggerty did the trail in a lightweight manner a few years ago. I think he did it in something like three days. He rigged up a harness/but-pack system that was really lightweight.

 

He has since moved to Bozeman MT and I haven't seen any postings by him since he left Seattle. Maybe you can track him down via e-mail and get some good beta from him? Tray a search. He really had the trail dialed in.

 

My understanding of the trail is such that it would be quite challenging to do it in 48 hrs...DAMN near impossible. blush.gif

 

But hey, give it a shot. I take it you plan on running the vast majortity of the trail.

 

As far as water goes....just use iodine. confused.gif Lightweight, cheap, simple. wazzup.gif

 

The time you take to pump any water filtrations ystem will eat into your running time way too much. Plus it means added weight, and if you have problems maintainence, and if it breaks they all say to carry iodine anyway....

 

Good luck....post a trip report.

 

wave.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no need to run. It is just a consistant walk. If you are in good shape 48 hours is plenty of time. I plan on trying this again in a month or so when the weather cools down. I failed last time I tried for several reasons, least of which was not being in top shape. One thing is for sure, I started too fast -- 5 miles an hour. I would shoot for 3 miles an hour. Good luck. Let us know how it goes...

Edited by AllYouCanEat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been training to do this as well -- But my goal is 36 hours. I made an attempt last week, but got dehydrated and I decided to bail at Mowich once it started raining. I'm going to try again the next full moon. Some advice:

 

If you have support available at Mowich and Sunrise, the run becomes substantially easier. My plan is to do it self-supported though.

 

There's lots of water on the trail, so you don't need to carry too much. Last time, I started with 3.5 L and carried iodine tablets. Next time, I'm going to carry less and bring a filter. The filter costs less weight wise, because when you stop at a stream you can always drink the weight of the filter immediately instead of waiting a half hour...

 

Regarding food, I took 60 shots of GU (4 gelflasks, plus 8 refill packs), 2 bear valley powerbars (some protein and fiber), 3 PBJ sandwiches, plus 20 oz of gatorade mix. Next time, I'm going to take about the same, but perhaps 2 or 3 packs less GU.

 

I took about 12 lbs of gear including shoes, clothing, poles, etc. (+ 6 lbs food, +8 lbs water). My bivy system consisted of a FF helios jacket, shell pants and a cut down 3 oz blue foam pad (and a loaned tarp from the ranger at Mowich Lake - Thanks). Next time, I'll bring a light bivy sack and sleeping bag, just for the security of being able to stop in comfort. A 40 degree night in the rain with the gear I brought is easily survivable, but lower in the comfort scale than not stopping at all...

 

There are parts of the trail where you won't want to stop because of mosquitoes. If you keep moving, they have trouble keeping up.

 

Regarding timing, I hiked the uphills at 40 fpm, and ran the downhills for an overall average of about 3 mph (some stops). You don't have to move too fast to make it in 48 hours, just keep going...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve Fox did it in three days last year. I asked him why so fast and the answer was that was home much time he had to do it. He didn't run, didn't hike at night. He carried a 15 lb pack, I believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Earlier this season I was thinking about going for it in 24 hours, but after my 50 K run in March I realized how much training mileage that would likely involve, and I put it on a back burner. 48 hours sounds better. 3 mph will get you through it in 30 hours. That leaves 18 hours for sleeping! Except to average 3 mph you need to be at the equivalent of a run on all the uphill parts. I think with a light pack and determination you could do it in 2 days with a bivy and not have to push ALL that hard-- not as hard as you'd need to do it in 24 hours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm shooting for (3) days with stashes every 31 miles or so. Light pack and a bivy....Nothing too amazing, but it will be fun!!!!Probably wait until late September, less bugs, less tourons. ooo.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just fukin go for it. an if you get tired stop and rest. do they still sell max alert at the drugstores?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dwayner has tried this stunt three times in the past. First time, made great progress until buddy's knee blew out....unwanted bivouac and nine mile stagger out to the road. Second time....more injuries, funny story, but not here. Third-time....ditched buddy and went alone...new special shoes caused serious blisters after about 20 miles...hiked to road in socks and hitch-hiked out.

There was a guy a few years ago who did it all in under 24 hours I think and maybe over 30 years ago, Gary Frederickson?? did it in something like 36 hours including a few hours of sleep.

Perhaps you might want to start by doing it in three days and work down to two or whatever. I started counter-clockwise from Longmire each time and I knew the trail from having backpacked the entire thing in the traditional approximately 10 days. I look forward to trying it again...maybe next year when I can walk again.

 

I also recommend as a "warm-up", the Loowit Trail that circles Mt. St. Helens. I did this about a year ago starting at Windy Ridge on the north side. Including the approach, it was about 36 miles, at least 20 of which were brutal in one way or another. It took us about 14 hours with only about 45 minutes of breaks. Just carried camelbacks, ski poles, adventure racing shoes, and a couple of sandwiches and a couple of powerbars....lots of challenging terrain to catch your attention, slow you down and wear you out. Very dramatic scenery throughout.

 

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike G. emailed me that a Rainier ranger (no surprise) named Dan Ostrowski did it in just about 24 hours several years ago. He did not recount this as anything like an "official" record, so don't get on him for details.

The St. Helens circumnavigation sounds cool. I'd read about it in a trail running guide I have, but was uncertain as to the quality of the scenery. It sounds definitely worth a go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a fine accomplishment, but it would be even better if the race went all the way up Whitney and you weren't allowed to have a "four-person, two-van crew" spraying you with water every three minutes.

 

The Burning Man freaks should do that race to experience the same kind of desert hallucinations for less mushsmile.gif.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dru said:

i bet this woman could do it under 24 no prob:

 

news story

A 42-year-old mother from Arizona won a 217-kilometre, 28-hour-plus ultramarathon in temperatures that reached 51 degrees celcius.

"After about 17 to 18 hours you really want to sleep," said Greg Minter, a two time-finisher. "You may have hallucinations, which can vary from very mild to characterized images. Last year I saw a dinosaur around mile 108."
mushsmile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried last year just before my shoulder sugery. I wanted to do it in 2 1/2 days. I did about 50 miles in 24hrs, then I bailed. I wanted to make sure I wouldn't miss the Pre-op for my surgery.

I brought tablets for water, two plastic tubes of GU and about 25 additional packets & one Fred Meyer's french roll.

I wanted to go self sustained. Had a bivy and light weight sleeping bag. Only brought a light weight wind breaker to put on and a BlackDiamond LED headlamp. I did a bit of hiking in the dark. Used light weight running shoes. Since it rain about 50% of the time I was out I got soaked, as did the down bag I had. Part of the reason I bailed.

Will try this again in a few weeks. Anyone here if the trail is 100% free of snow?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend and I did the wonderland trail recently (Saturdya-Tuesday) in Four days. We started at 9.30am on Saturday and finished about 4pm on Tuesday. Our packs weighed about 10-14 lbs. It was definitly not easy, we really had to push ourselves, we hiked from 7.30am to 12 midnight one day (we didt 30+miles that day) . It was really awesome, a few areas had bugs, though and there was no bridge over the south mowich river. we started and ended at Sunrise. the section from sunrise to nickel creek (day one) was probably the most spectacular. overall hard but fun thumbs_up.gifbigdrink.gif

Edited by AlpinistAndrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AlpinistAndrew said:

Our packs weighed about 10-14 lbs.

 

I love going light blush.gif , what did you take to get down that low for a 4 day trip?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a light backpack, light 3season bag, a tarp (that we shared), a polypro top and bottom, light gloves, wool cap, rainjacket and a pair of xtra socks. also a ion headlamp, chlorine water purifier drops, knife, and a few other odds and ends. no stove. our food consisted of some salami, string chees, top ramen, granola (brkfast), and some clif bars. we ate the ramen dry, it was actually pretty good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×