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rob

How much protein?

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count me #2 for ice baths making a noticeable and immediate difference in recovery (and hence subsequent performance) versus diet or supplements.

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Steck had trained harder for the Eiger climb than he ever had in his life, and harder than most professional climbers ever do. He concluded that he—and elite alpine climbers in general—were mere amateurs when it comes to training. World-class cyclists, swimmers, and runners enhanced their training with everything that modern science had to offer. Climbing was stuck in the Stone Age.[/i]

 

 

I was perusing my lady's triathlete magazines (Lava) recently and was amazed at the depth of the body of knowledge triathletes have at their disposal compared to climbers, although Mountain Athlete made strides to build structured workout programs for climbers of different pursuits (ice,alpine, etc.).

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The thing is...and I have already run in to this a ton with my son's baseball training...and he is only 12!!! But anyway "all that modern science has to offer" is a pretty strange subject to delve into. Just ask Arod.

 

I'm not saying there is a right and a wrong...though I have my own thoughts about it. But it is a contentious issue, what is kosher in the human body when you take it to an extreme. With "nutrition", specifically.

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Climbing for three months straight and eating the cheapest/highest calorie food in the grocery store has me in probably the best climbing shape of my entire life right now. For the last couple weeks I've been able to stay pretty strong by going on runs and doing a decently large hiking/soloing day in the mountains (15-20 miles and 10 or so moderate guidebook pitches in 7-10 hours). Living in Olympia is good for replenishing my bank account but bad for the huge increase in beer consumption/decrease in desire to live.

 

I'm also 20 years old, so that could be my biggest asset. I have pretty much zero motivation to lift weights in the gym or the pull plastic (plus climbing gym memberships cost money, something I don't have in excess). I've been doing deadhangs on my homemade 'hangboard' and run laps on a crack machine now that it's the only 'climbing' within a convenient distance.

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I only eat live chickens that I have raised myself.

 

Ah, the modified "Ozzy" diet, first perfected by Aleister Crowley during his chalk period. I've been too much of a pansy to try and pluck a live chicken, but I've heard it gets results.

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