Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
gruntpltleader

Gear Reccomendation for expanding the rack

Recommended Posts

Alright, I am posting in the noob section as I still consider myself a newb. I have been climbing on and off for about 5-6 years. Mulitple trips to the middle east can really kill a climbin season not to mention people. I have summitted Mt Hood via SS and Mt. Washington, North Ridge, and have aspirations of the rest of the oregon cascades on the bucket list.

 

I finally brainwashed the wife into climbing at Smith after she went up Mt. Washington with me

SAM_0073.JPG

 

 

I attended climb school and a sport climb workshop, bought some draws, and a rope, started to learn how to climb.

 

SAM_0017.JPG

 

It has been a largely self taught. :confused: I use this site, John Longs anchor books, and various other sources to try and not get killed. I got so I could climb about 5.9 reliably in the gym and sport lead 5.8 at smith. Dihedrals, Rope de Dope, and a few others.I have recently gone trad climbing and have fallen in love with easy multi-pitch trad and sport.

 

I fell into an awesome deal on a virtually new rack (full set of C-4 with Nuetrino biners rack pack?

 

SAM_00181.JPG

 

, Tricams from pink to black, set of BD nuts 1-13(doubled later 4-13)

 

:SAM_0019.JPG

 

set of slung chocks)600$

 

I hope they were not stolen, but the guy was not a tweeker and said he needed money for his wedding. His fiance was in the car and didnt seem very happy with him even attempting to climb...sad 8D.

 

SAM_0015.JPG

 

I have added alpine draws and runners single and double length. I have also added a Cordolette rigged in Equalette.

 

SAM_00221.JPG

 

I live on the Oregon coast and really don't have a mentor so I tend to climb very conservatively. With trad I followed and then led Super slab and Cinnamon slab with Moscow and Spiderman on my list next. Maybe Pioneer route if I had a mentor to second and coach and aiders/ascenders.

With my aspiration and reallistic goals of probably not ever leading above 5.9-5.10a in my life, and having around 5-700 $ to play with, what would you buy? and what would you climb next if you were in my shoes?

 

BTW I would love to hook up with someone for climbing in the PDX area if you dont mind a noob. Ill bring beer for after :brew:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You've got more gear than you probably need at this point!

 

For most climbs I'd say only use a single set of nuts #4-13. Maybe ditch the bottom 2 or 3 sizes on the hexes since they overlap with the large nuts and are covered by cams as well (unless you know you need extra hand size pieces). Tri-cams are great to swap a few nuts out for on mellow alpine stuff but I don't use them cragging much.

 

At some point you might want doubles in the #1 and #2 Camalot sizes, but even that would be optional, and if you're hooking up with someone else who climbs trad just borrow theirs.

 

Best use of the $ would be gas to spend a lot of time climbing! And don't write off climbing better than 10a!! It's 90% believing that you can do it, being able to stay calm when the fear starts to creep in, having the mental toughness to make committing moves when it's safe, and having the presence of mind to climb and rest efficiently. It's not beyond anyone who puts their mind to it. The other 10% is footwork!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spend money on gas or airfare and instruction if you feel like you need it. Take a roadtrip to Red Rock and get psyched on easy multi-pitch climbing!

 

I'd augment the gear pile with an autoblocking belay device like the ATC-Guide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate the feedback. I have one on my harness. It was in the gym bag. it is good to know that my gear whore tendencies can be put into check for a while. I was thinking about double in the .75-to 3 in C4's, but with the tri cams I seem to be able to cover. I would love to climb outside more, but with graduate school kicking my ass, time is mostly an issue. My biggest problem is I am the only one rating my placements. I check each piece, but with my experience, I still tend to be very conservative. I won't really stretch my ability until I am sure of my gear. The lack of a mentor is really becoming an issue. When i ask my coastie freinds to climb with me the first question is whether or not there is good elk hunting up there. I like to hunt, but I have to climb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO spending money on a guide is probably the best thing you can do. I have been climbing for about two years, soaking up what I can from books and climbing. Every time I have done some guided trips or clinics, my base of knowledge have increased exponentially. The NW has plenty of great guides to learn from. just my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the rest of the posts. Save the money and take the first oppertunity to spend 2-4 weeks at a climbing destination (Valley, City of Rocks, Indian Creek, Index). Keep in mind that any trad partner that you meet is likely to have gear as well, so doubling up is easy if needed. You have more stuff than you need for most climbs, and if you start doing easy alpine rock climbs, the pressure will be to take less, not more. You'll be leaving those big cams at home as often as possible!

Edited by Hall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 5 and 6 have their uses like swinging at cats or boat anchors. They rarely even make it out of the closet. They just came with the deal. The biggest one that I ever set was the 4 at the top of super slab. I really didn't need it as I had a great arm bar in the crack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get stationed in Sacramento and climb with me!!

 

You have more than enough gear as mentioned. I second (or third,fourth) the idea of hiring a guide. You'll get more out of a couple days with a private guide than a class because they can focus on what you want or need instead of catering to the least experienced. And well worth the money.

 

I'm recovering from a broken wrist/arm but if you want to hit Smith this spring let me know.

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You've got plenty of gear. Toss the hexes in the trash unless you plan on mixed climbing in Scotland in winter.

You're kidding right? Keep the hexes, get rid of most of the larger tri-cams, or as suggested kill something with them. As most have said you have a more than adequate rack for most things you're likely to try. Without a mentor/teacher it sounds like you're being pretty sensible about learning the basics. Be safe ------------dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Dave - lose the larger tricams. And it looks like your trad draws are on the long side. I'd go with 22" 11mm trad draws and more of them. Beyond that a set of DMM Alloy Offset Nuts (#7-11).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only have the one set of cams and no doubles. I usually leave the larger hexes on the ground. i do tend to haul the tri cams and the smaller hexes to round out the lack of extra cams. I am still learning and tend to "sew it up" even on the easier routes. At the very least, I get more gear placement practice. I am interested in the offset nuts. Are they really worth it at my experience level? Right now my main focus is learning how to place bomber gear. I try to evaluate it and the rock around it for quite some time. very conservative. I figure that If I can place bomber gear then accepting risk with marginal placements will become easier with more experience. Hence easier routes, multi-pitch, less well known climbs or in the offseason. I hate to keep people waiting while I am flailing around. I am going to get at least a day worth of guided lessons and maybe a guided trip up monkey face. That looks like a great climb. I am interested in learning the aid process. That seems like a very good way to learn how to place and evaluate gear. Your thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your thoughts?

 

I can't read anything you write due to the "distraction" image. damn!

:tup:

 

Not that we're complaining mind you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think at this point you don't need more gear, you need more miles.

 

If you are thinking about "doubles" in sizes, it means either you are prone to sewing it up on routes and are running out of your pro before the top on a 50m pitch, or you are climbing harder than mid-5.10 and really need doubles, in which case I'd guess you wouldnt be posting this in the Newbie forum.

 

You need practice and mileage climbing a ton of moderates to 5.9 Index, to start feeling better about your gear (or lack thereof). You shouldnt need doubles until you're getting into mid-5.10 or so.

 

I'd MOST HIGHLY recommend a long trip to Squamish, the Gunks, or some such area where there are a good number of trad moderates (5.3 - 5.7) you can do without feeling too stressed out on, to feel more comfortable.

 

Once in a while check back and try some harder or steeper trad climbs - I find Vantage serves this well - you'll know what you need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, one very tried and true phase that most of the people I've climbed with have gone through, as you alluded to, is aid climbing; it tends to make one much more gear savvy. I had a couple years there where all I did was aid solo at Index during the winter. A number of folks here on the board went through that phase with me. When you are suddenly standing and bouncing on every placement, it makes your placements much better over time.

 

It also helped my alpine skills somewhat, as it was the first time I drove pins, placed bolts (this in the boulder fields..!) and messed with bashies and copperheads. The pin driving helped my winter alpine in later years.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

assuming your partner does not have any gear to contribute to your second set of certain sizes, I usually like to have double of the #1 tcu up to #2 camalot. (don't know the inch equivelant off the top of my head)

 

Yeah get more experience but place lots of gear, early and often.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Climbing with the wife forces us to share the shown rack. It seems that when I climb certain climbs it takes alot of the same size of gear. When I get to the anchor I am scrambling to find what I need. that is why I am considering more gear.

 

creative placements. I am assuming that this comes with experience. I am placing gear before and after the "crux". I protect traverses for the second. I like the Jesus nut concept and always try to protect early and often for the first 20-30 feet of the pitch. I try to make sure that the first piece is multi directional. I aspire to make sure that they hold in the direction of fall and for outward pull. I try to assess the rock quality. I try to think about what the second will have to do to clean the piece.

 

What am I missing

 

While I am doing all of that, I am trying to route find and plan my next move or stance.

 

When all of that becomes second nature, I think that climbing will be alot more fun. I am having a blast with the technology and engineering involved, but managing fear of climbing above protection and concentrating on the above considerations is what I really enjoy.

 

trad leading is fascinating. learning is always great.

I really appreciate the advice. thank you.

Edited by gruntpltleader

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sounds like you're doing pretty much everything you should. How about short falls onto your gear? Put in a bomber piece and move above it and let your belayer know what you're up to and fall off. Confidence building. Obviously back up the pro and don't do it where you'll hit the deck :-)

Some areas take multiples of certain sizes, you tend to build up a rack to suit your chosen area. I like to go with a double set of nuts Wild Country and DMM, maybe even triples in the mid sizes. How about not placing the obvious size of nut/cam and instead look around for the not so obvious? If looking ahead it looks like I'll need a lot of say the larger stuff, then I'll start looking for for smaller placements right now and save the bigger stuff. Practice makes perfect,

good luck ------------------dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think falling on trad gear happens, but i would much rather practice falling on steep sporto climbs where a fall will not result in injury. smith rock is your friend here. if you havent been pushing it into 10a at Smith, and taken some falls, that's a really good exprience to get you to trust the safety system - ropes, belay, pro - more. In 1995 i pushed into 11a for the first time as a leader after getting used to falling on the 10s all summer there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

If you are thinking about "doubles" in sizes, it means either you are prone to sewing it up on routes and are running out of your pro before the top on a 50m pitch, or you are climbing harder than mid-5.10 and really need doubles, in which case I'd guess you wouldnt be posting this in the Newbie forum.

 

You shouldnt need doubles until you're getting into mid-5.10 or so.

 

What does the grade of the climb have to do with how much pro you use? I'd think the inverse would be true. Sew up the slabby low angle shit and run it out on the steeper stuff. Once you are into the 10's the falls are usually cleaner and you won't need to put in as much gear or hang out in a shitty stance to fiddle something in.

 

If you don't use up a single set of cams in a 50 meter pitch I'd say you are plenty bold all ready. Don't know too many climbers that would go 150+ ft with only a single set of cams. Assuming you can use up to #3 Camalot that leaves you with only 7 cams. Of course you'll be able to use a few of those nuts you've got but I'd think the hexes and yes maybe even the tricams would come in handy for a pitch like that.

 

Don't believe all of the "advice" you are given on these boards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×