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rbwen

Sleeping Bag Sleeping

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I've heard this debate a few times but never gotten a definitive answer so hopefully people can shed some light...

 

If you are sleeping in a sleeping bag and it's very cold is it better to sleep with all of your clothes on (which seems to be the case in high-altitude climbing scenarios) or nekkid (or close to it)?

 

Sleeping naked would mean the sleeping bag is just warming your body up without clothing in the way???

 

Me, personally, I've always put on as much as I had because of the drafts.

 

rbwen

 

 

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I've often found that using a sweater or down sweater as a baffle around the neck increases warmth more than wearing it. This is especially true if you are zipping two bags together with your sweetheart.

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You're going to put all those clothes on eventually. I typically sleep in everything I carry, except for the day's wet socks. Those dry in my shirt. Metabolism differ, so YMMV.

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If your bag is warm enough and you wear all of your clothes, then you may start to sweat. If you sweat enough, you will either become uncomfortable at best or sweat out the clothes and bag (which will conduct heat) and then be cold. It is a matter of how warm the environment is and how warm your bag and clothing combination is. Most people get by with the smallest bag and wear clothes so that the "temp rating" for the combination is just right. But try doing that in a -20 degree bag on a august night in the cascades.

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A down hood (FF sells them for about $50), which weighs next to nothing, does wonders for upping staying toasty in a lighter bag, and it looks styling first thing in the morning, too.

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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Hubby and his dad always swore by naked or close to it but I -- an always-cold girl -- just can't. Winter camping, I have tried stripping down to baselayers to sleep and just shiver until I put my down jacket, fleece pants, down booties, gloves and fleece hat back on.

 

Hubby and his dad argued that they stay warmer with less clothes -- but it doesn't work for me.

 

So -- that's not a definitive answer, just another point of data for the debate...

 

 

 

 

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Nekkid as a jaybird. I once left on my base layers and my fleece jacket and pants in a -4F night in the Wallowas, thinking that my 20F bag needed the "boost" that my capilene and fleece would give. I sweated out early, soaked the bag and compressed the down, and chilled myself. I got out of my clothes, but my feet froze all night because that section of the bag never warmed up. Even a balaclava didn't help those po' dogs to git warm again... :(

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I always sleep hot too. I'm the jaybird sleeper in bed, but not in the bag. I can't stand sticking to the bag (I always end up sweating that's how hot I sleep). So I always bring a super light layer I can sleep in--not enough to warm me up and just enuf to absorb the moisture.

How's that for graphic? No one will ever want to camp with me now.

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I always sleep hot too. I'm the jaybird sleeper in bed, but not in the bag. I can't stand sticking to the bag (I always end up sweating that's how hot I sleep). So I always bring a super light layer I can sleep in--not enough to warm me up and just enuf to absorb the moisture.

How's that for graphic? No one will ever want to camp with me now.

 

pics?

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I always sleep hot too. I'm the jaybird sleeper in bed, but not in the bag. I can't stand sticking to the bag (I always end up sweating that's how hot I sleep). So I always bring a super light layer I can sleep in--not enough to warm me up and just enuf to absorb the moisture.

How's that for graphic? No one will ever want to camp with me now.

Au contraire'! I'm all over that. I mean, all over you! I love a sweaty napping partner. There's just something about all that glistening, sweaty skin. Makes me think of pr0n movies...

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That's because you have a coat of hair protecting you from the bag sticking experience. Trust me, it is unpleasant.

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Sleep naked in bed, in base-layer in sleeping bag.

 

 

A side benefit - toward the end of a week+ trip, the base layer provides some skeletal support.

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In the Sierra Club in the 1970's on mixed company trips, we recommended everyone sleep naked. Most of those great trips were co-ed. We all stayed plenty warm as I recall.

 

Of course, this is impossible today. It is not PC today. Life was very different in the 1970's: http://www.traditionalmountaineering.org/Photos_TopRopes.htm (Follow some of the other pages under Read More.)

--trad_guy

Edited by trad_guy

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In the Sierra Club in the 1970's on mixed company trips, we recommended everyone sleep naked. Most of those great trips were co-ed. We all stayed plenty warm as I recall.

 

Of course, this is impossible today. It is not PC today. Life was very different in the 1970's: http://www.traditionalmountaineering.org/Photos_TopRopes.htm (Follow some of the other pages under Read More.)

--trad_guy

That looks so fun! I'd totally do that if I weren't such a damn chunk. Either way, I bet the atmosphere was super fun, lighthearted, and easygoing--my kind of climbing!

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In the Sierra Club in the 1970's on mixed company trips, we recommended everyone sleep naked. Most of those great trips were co-ed. We all stayed plenty warm as I recall.

 

Of course, this is impossible today. It is not PC today. Life was very different in the 1970's: http://www.traditionalmountaineering.org/Photos_TopRopes.htm (Follow some of the other pages under Read More.)

--trad_guy

 

That's awesome.

 

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Sleeping naked would mean the sleeping bag is just warming your body up without clothing in the way???

 

 

The sleeping bag is not warming your body, it is your body warming the sleeping bag. Basically the more layers you have on more body heat you will hold in. If I am in the mountain with my winter bag, I am usually naked, well except for a hat. If I am in the winter time in my summer bag, I usually have all my clothes. I try to regulate my temprature so that I am limit persperation. At home I cannot stand having anything on when I sleep.

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