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Kitergal

Your Best Climbing Work-outs....

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alright..guys & gals..it's been awhile, and I can tell it's been while by the enlarged waist-band that I now wear!!

 

So, in my absense..I have ALMOST completed my MBA (yeah!! One more class to go!!!) and also increased my pant size by 2 (not so yeah..).

 

So, I need to get back in shape! I've got big plans for this summer to climb Aconcagua & Kili. I also want to get back into the old rock climbing gig! So, what is your best and most results driven work out? For both the long slogs up rainier (have two of those planned already) but yet won't bulk you up for the rocks?

 

Mind you, I do have a job, working 40+ hours a week....so going out climbing every day isn't really an option....I mean..I've got to pay for my trips somehow!! I'm looking for the after work/weekend activities that produce results!

 

I already eat healthy.and i'm not huge (I went from a size 6-8..so not THAT bad..but still bad!!) so getting back into shape..shouldn't be hard....but I know that there is no way I could make it up Rainier today in this shape!!

 

Anyone wanna kick my arse into shape with me on weekend hikes?? any way to make cardio fun? (I swear I have ADD! I get sooo bored on the treadmill I feel like scratching my eyes out!!)

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running on a treadmill ain't so bad - just smoke a huge blunt first, then listen to an entire hendrix album while you haul ass - you get extra pts for air-guitaring through the entirety of "voodoo child"

 

sublime and other assorted ear-candy help the miles melt away :)

 

bottom line, doing an hour of intense cardio a day quickly gets you in whatever cardio shape you gotta be - big mountains like kili, denali, etc ain't that tough anyhow - mostly a lotta glorified hiking w/ plenty of time for sitting around camp sucking down ho-hos and smoking your toilet paper :P

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define "intense" cardio? Like...going as hard as you can? If I do that..I for shizzle won't make an hour. So, going as hard as you think you can for an hour? is it better to quit early (and work on extending the time at that intensity) or better to go an hour (at a lower intensity)??

 

kili and Acon may not be hard...but I've done Rainier a plenty...and that bitch kicks my ass every time!!

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Here is a link to an article that seems to deal with a pretty similar subject matter and approach to the ones you describe.

 

AAI - Physical Conditioning for Alpine Climbing

 

For the working class professional, getting exercise is all about evenings and weekends eh. I get bored to death on the stair master and avoid it whenever possible, but it suits a purpose when outside time is limited. The climbing gym does the trick for staying in shape for the rock. Finding a spot where you can get some cardio and weights in along with a session on the rock wall seems like an ideal combo.

 

Succeeding on long routes and expeditions is often about having the mental strength and fortitude to go along with the needed base of physical conditioning. The only way to train for that aspect of climbing, besides spraying on the internet, is to put yourself into a series of progressively more involved or intense situations, bearing in mind personal safety and appropriate limits of course.

 

Good luck and have fun!

 

 

 

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One other thought on weight. For technical rock, lighter is better, so burning off excess fat while maitaining/increasing muscle is good. For high altitude climbing, a reasonable amount of fat stored up is a good thing to provide a fuel reserve if you lose appetite or get sick at altitude (or get a bug from food/water once you arrive). I had a friend who headed to Cho-Oyu this fall in the best shape of her life....solid muscle with little or no fat...her typical (rock-climber) physique. I commented mid summer that she might want to bulk up a bit - that her body would start consuming itself at altitude....and she laughed and commented that she was too vain and that she would try and eat more once she got to Tibet.

 

I just saw her at vertical world last week for the first time since she returned and asked her how it went. The first words out of her mouth were "you were right about the weight thing". She never made it past camp two. Obviously Kili and AC are not 8000 meter peaks, but I'd think a little extra flesh would serve you well at least on AC.

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On cardio machines I listen to books on mp3 - my local library has them available for download.

 

I also have a small video player that I watch occasionally.

 

Totally with you on the gouging eyes out thing - keep a rusty spoon handy.

 

I work about 15 minutes away from a canyon in the NF in which I can always find an hour to kill - whether climbing, hiking, scoping out future climbs or just watching the bighorn sheep.

 

 

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If you want to throw money at it I've heard good things about Crossfit and looked into it a bit myself. It's a full body exercise program which will benefit your body more than just pure cardio. It concentrates on short intense work outs so it's easy to fit into a busy schedule although you probably won't be able to do much after. They have a free fitness test but require a high level before you can enter the group sessions. That means hiring a personal trainer for a while which is $$$$.

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One other thought on weight. For technical rock, lighter is better, so burning off excess fat while maitaining/increasing muscle is good. For high altitude climbing, a reasonable amount of fat stored up is a good thing to provide a fuel reserve if you lose appetite or get sick at altitude (or get a bug from food/water once you arrive). I had a friend who headed to Cho-Oyu this fall in the best shape of her life....solid muscle with little or no fat...her typical (rock-climber) physique. I commented mid summer that she might want to bulk up a bit - that her body would start consuming itself at altitude....and she laughed and commented that she was too vain and that she would try and eat more once she got to Tibet.

 

I just saw her at vertical world last week for the first time since she returned and asked her how it went. The first words out of her mouth were "you were right about the weight thing". She never made it past camp two. Obviously Kili and AC are not 8000 meter peaks, but I'd think a little extra flesh would serve you well at least on AC.

 

Take note you skinny rock wimps

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cordless laps on beacon rock

and to keep the bulk up, a mandatory 40 oz of da blue bull upon passing through the ledge on each lap

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They have a free fitness test but require a high level before you can enter the group sessions. That means hiring a personal trainer for a while which is $$$$.

 

This isn't necessarily true and varies by facility. The facility I train at http://www.crossfiteastside.com/ does not require any 'tests'. They only require that you start in the 'elements' classes which are for beginners before you jump into the regular classes. No need to spend extra money.

 

It's more than you will pay at a box gym but those of us on this board who do crossfit all swear by it. One of the many attractions/benefits is not dealing with the cardio treadmill/stairmaster routine. I'd rather eat ground up glass than go back to that. The crossfit routines are varied, fun and hard but you never know what you are going to get that day until you show up. It completely eliminates the boredom factor.

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cordless laps on beacon rock

and to keep the bulk up, a mandatory 40 oz of da blue bull upon passing through the ledge on each lap

 

and the looks on the faces of the hikers as you pass time after time running down to the base.

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They have a free fitness test but require a high level before you can enter the group sessions. That means hiring a personal trainer for a while which is $$$$.

 

This isn't necessarily true and varies by facility. The facility I train at http://www.crossfiteastside.com/ does not require any 'tests'. They only require that you start in the 'elements' classes which are for beginners before you jump into the regular classes. No need to spend extra money.

 

It's more than you will pay at a box gym but those of us on this board who do crossfit all swear by it. One of the many attractions/benefits is not dealing with the cardio treadmill/stairmaster routine. I'd rather eat ground up glass than go back to that. The crossfit routines are varied, fun and hard but you never know what you are going to get that day until you show up. It completely eliminates the boredom factor.

 

why does everybody make things so complicated , climb til your spent.

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The OP wanted general fitness advice for Aconcagua etc with some rock climbing thrown in on the side. Climbing-til-yer-spent won't help much there. You'll get a hell of a lot more out of a full body fitness program for something like that.

 

hydroman: I was going by the Crossfit Vancouver guidelines.

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as hard as it is to believe, i can read. my best work out was the question. so how about 5000ft. plus climbing and lots of miles in between and scrambling to boot and cordless to get your head in the game. will that cut it.

Edited by pink

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as hard as it is to believe, i can read. my best work out was the question. so how about 5000ft. plus climbing and lots of miles in between and scrambling to boot and cordless to get your head in the game. will that cut it.

 

Probably not, it's cold and dark after work here now. And damn wet too! Getting motivated is tough.

 

Ya got family, ya got job, you have responsibilities - you have blah blah blah and some more blah to keep you off track.

 

How about just starting with a workout partner?

 

I've been thinking about going for a hike in the dark up Balch Creek (inside of town) with a pack on, but have been wussing. Its much warmer next to the computer:-)

 

If I had a workout partner, it would be much harder to blow it off. My best climbing workouts were when I had a partner and a series of play dates: otherwise, it just soooo easy to head home like a horse to the barn for hay.

 

Thats for the winter anyway, rest of the year, go with Pink: after work I head out to a local cliff (which cliff is time and sun dependent) with like minded folks and we burn some laps.

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probably not for you. i think he said he was climbing it in the summer.

 

remember he asked your best.

 

some laps in the wet cold at night with a headlamp is not unreasonable.i've had it worst. i have led A4 in the dark and i am no expert.

 

you think it's hard to get motivated when waking up in your bed well try it on the mountain, i'm sure it would be good training.

 

bill, you are getting old and i'm right behind ya but not quite yet.

 

 

 

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bill, you are getting old and i'm right behind ya but not quite yet.

No way dude, not you too!

 

Damn. Whats this world coming too! Sigh....

 

 

:wave::lmao:

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i quit drinking and burning, and bill i feel about 10 years younger already. i lost seven pounds this week with my new habits. i wanna climb hard again. business is set and i'm ready to rock. heading south for two weeks in december and january and i can;t wait to fuck off on the rock. weather is kick ass here, don't miss the sogg. you gotta be captain crunch to deal.

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Swimming and Yoga.

Screw running, though fun.

 

Swimming is boring but great cardio and you can run underwater which is actually tough.

Yoga is wonderful.

 

I have been trying to do more functional/balance stuff with wieghts and balls instead of the lifting, getting sore, lifting again cycle.

I am now all about flexiblity with strength and reducing/controlling inflammation.

 

 

 

 

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as hard as it is to believe, i can read. my best work out was the question. so how about 5000ft. plus climbing and lots of miles in between and scrambling to boot and cordless to get your head in the game. will that cut it.

 

Did you read the part about wanting to train for Kili? Or did you just want to use this thread as another opportunity to remind everyone that yes in fact pink has climbed el cap?

 

Just to be safe you might consider posting 80 more times about it. Just to be safe.

 

Marie: check out crossfit. You'll love it and do really well @ it considering your background in gymnastics/tumbling/etc. PM Fern if you want a female take on crossfit.

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wasn't talking about el cap. was talking about mileage on easier terrain. el cap is only 2800 feet tall the last time i checked and would never consider climbing it cordless. i could give a fuck what you know i've climbed but if you want to tell me what you have climbed i will surely lend you an ear and congratulate. you know i was accused of not contributing anything to this site, so i did and now i'm getting shit from someone who i don't know but would be glad to hang with you. i could take you or leave you. i know you climb at beacon and we have mutual friends, feel free to play your game and i'll play mine. sorry i don't have any new great trip reports, i do alot of cragging these days but nothing i would report. i can't get away that much anymore. just to let you know i think i will post it 80 more time since now i know it annoys you so much. maybe someday i can meet you, i am sure you are a great guy and then you can flip me shit to my face. i used to get in really good shape climbing fast on easy terrain and didn't mention el cap until bill chimed in. bring it on john. neither you or i are going to change the world. by the way i'm pretty pround of my achievements considering i grew up in the middle of a corn field and didn't have mommy and daddy credit card to feed my vice. i figured if i annoyed the great john frieh you might ignore me but it's good to know i can get under your skin and take space up in your head.

 

have a wonderful evening, :wave:

 

 

Edited by pink

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One interesting physiology tidbit i learned the other day in my exercise physiology class is that if you are trying to become stronger by lifting weights, but also trying to get in good cardiovascular shape, you should not do cardio and weight lifting on the same day. It messes with the way your body responds to the weight lifting and doesn't end up repairing the strength-trained muscles (type IIa and IIx) as strong. Best thing to do is to do cardio one day and then weight train the next. That didn't seem to mess up the muscle repairing as much.

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So, what is your best and most results driven work out? For both the long slogs up rainier (have two of those planned already) but yet won't bulk you up for the rocks?

 

Arrrrg! I can't let this go by...

 

Don't mistake muscle tone for "bulk". Often it happens that you start to get toned but don't lose the weight like you thought, you then convince yourself that your new found muscle density is making you massive - its not. Its pretty hard especially for a female to get "too bulky". Chances are that its not "bulk", but flab, fat and even inflexibility that is the issue -particularly for a climber. If working out is making you (or parts of you) feel "too large" then a dietary adjustment might be needed in addition to a flexibility routine. Cutting carbohydrate percentages vis a vis protein (maybe even cutting overall calories a bit) and eating smaller meals but more often can help. The people I have known who desired an increase in mass did it by eating like pigs, thousands and thousands of calories a day, steaks by the pound, whatever they could eat they would -IN ADDITION to extremely intense strength training. Just for general info, The "bulkiness" thing should never be an excuse to avoid strength building type training. Manage any "mass" issues you have mainly with diet, and never sacrifice being strong in favor of being thin -imo.

 

you know, Im juss sayin...

 

 

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