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David_Parker

D-DAY

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On this date, 58 years ago, the "greatest" battle ever fought for freedom took place on the beaches of Normandy. I have been reding quite a bit about war recently and specifically WWII. To me these soldiers exemplified the true meaning of heros. While todays war is more like a video game and we are almost shocked if someone on our side actually dies, I wonder if, as time passes and especially the veterans of D-Day pass away, we will ever have real heros any more. (I grant the firefighters similar status, but they don't really "expect" to die). Also, while "D-Day" has been specifically asigned to June 6, 1944, the actuall term was assigned to any similar type attack and that the battle for Iwo Jima should not be overlooked. It took less than 24 hours to secure the beaches in France. It took 36 days to take over that small Island in the South Pacific with far more casulties. I bring this up because of recent deaths in the mountains and the fact we all know as climbers we may be actually closer to death at times than we think. But how would you feel if you were one of these guys and your chances were far greater? For me, when the shit hits the fan and I think things can't get much worse, it helps to think of these guys. I thank my lucky stars I was never forced into battle. I often wonder what I would have done if I had. It makes me feel wimpy sometimes. No real "question" here, just interested in your thoughts... and asking you to take a few moments to remember our real heros, the ones that died "today" so that we may live "tomorrow."

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Between 1937 and 1945 Heinz produced a version of Alphabet Spaghetti especially for the German market that consisted solely of little pasta

swastikas.

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The thing that has always awed me in reading about the Normandy Invasion is the fact that these soldiers were informed ahead of time that casualty rates of up to 70-80% were expected in some areas, and yet these men went into harm's way and fought against incredible odds.

 

Thanks for the reminder, Dave.

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quote:

Originally posted by Peter Puget:

Also, 60 years ago this week was the Battle of Midway. Something worth reading about too.

Too true, the war in Europe seems to get all the press, but the Pacific War was incredibly brutal from all that I've read/heard. There was no "Geneva Convention" in the Pacific Theater.

[big Drink] Thank a vet!

 

Greg

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quote:

Originally posted by Greg W:

quote:

Originally posted by Peter Puget:

Also, 60 years ago this week was the Battle of Midway. Something worth reading about too.

Too true, the war in Europe seems to get all the press, but the Pacific War was incredibly brutal from all that I've read/heard. There was no "Geneva Convention" in the Pacific Theater.

[big Drink]
Thank a vet!

 

Greg

The Germans looked at their foes as soldiers also. The Japanese looked at their foes as animals. Much the way the US did during the Vietnam conflict.

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quote:

Originally posted by ScottP:

[/QB]Much the way the US did during the Vietnam conflict.[/QB]

You are making a blanket statement that is impossible to back up. The Viet Cong viewed US soldiers as inferior, as many US soldiers saw them. Read "We Were Soldiers Once...And Young" (don't just rent the DVD). There were many heroes that came out of the Vietnam War; your blanket statement cheapens their heroism. Just my opinion.

 

Greg

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What always amazed me, was that a 1st wave Indiana National Guard Infantry Battalion (1000+ men) ceased to exist in 3 minutes. I can't even fathom that. Accrording to doctrine we (the army) are not suppose to fight anyone unless they are 1/3 our size. (i.e. 9 US soldiers vs. 3 enemy soldiers) We never train for the cluster fuck. bad juju.

 

Another amazing story was the 2nd Ranger Battlion assult on Pointe du Huc. They attacked up a 100 ft crumbling shale cliff, with germans throwing grenades on them, to destory 6 cannons that over looked Omaha beach. The cannons were moved inland before the attack, and were destroyed by the First Sergeant. The Rangers held the cliffs for 3 days before being releived and sustained 75% casulties. I always wonder if I could do something like that, too bad I'm not over there with my comrades and friends to find out.

 

RLTW [big Drink] Blacksheep, Bad Muthers, Earth Pigs, and AT

 

[ 06-06-2002, 05:33 PM: Message edited by: mtnrgr ]

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MTNRGR, Does that mean that you are a mountain trained Ranger? Just wondering. My old man was in the 10th Mountain Division in WW II. Those were mountian trained infantry-- bad to the bone.

We need a big mountain inf. unit (real one) in a real hurry-- too bad the army can't see that.

BTW-- mountain phase don't count-- no offense, I'm only sayin'...

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quote:

Originally posted by none:

My old man was in the 10th Mountain Division in WW II. .

hey none - my old man was in the 10th during the big one also. maybe they should trade email addresses...

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