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none_dup1

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About none_dup1

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    Fine Artist
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    Davenport,WA,USA
  1. Any recent reports would be welcome! (trail conditions, pro needed, etc.) Thanks!
  2. D-DAY

    MTNRGR, Does that mean that you are a mountain trained Ranger? Just wondering. My old man was in the 10th Mountain Division in WW II. Those were mountian trained infantry-- bad to the bone. We need a big mountain inf. unit (real one) in a real hurry-- too bad the army can't see that. BTW-- mountain phase don't count-- no offense, I'm only sayin'...
  3. More Rescue Related Stuff

    I'm not sure that the $15 goes into anything othe r than the general fund. Anybody got info that disagrees with that? The climbing patrols are very worthwhile (except the next time a punk on the Muir Snowfeild yells at one of my group about stepping on the rocks, I'm sure that I'll have to clock him), and the cleanup essential, it's just that I don't think the fee goes directly there. I'm tired of the PS complaining about cut budgets, and then thrashing around for solutions and finding climber's fees to be a good, PC target. When I payed my $150 on McKinley, I gave some thought to spray painting it red. Smoot wrote a great article, many years back, on the extremely low incidence of climber rescues versus "good old boy" rescues. It's stunning when you contemplate the unfairness of direct user fees to climbers, but not to day hikers, etc.
  4. chair peak accident saturday

    In defense of our friend, here, I remeber doing the E. face years ogo. Mostly, I liked the cool drawing in Beckey's guide. It wasn't a whole lot of help, though. We had limited scouting, since the face was covered by a rising fog. When I was sure that it was lifting, I led up the center weakness and found little to no pro, although what I would describe as wonderful rock, about 4th Class. I remember clipping a knifeblade that was hammered down at 90 %, and worked out about halfway! Also remember having opposed small nuts or even micros for the first few "anchors". This experience, and others in the Snoqualmie alps, has taught me to include pitons on my rack in that area. BTW, there's a great crag right there, but a beer would have to be donated to get it out of me... We traversed right to the NE ridge, somewhere under the rockband which is the first class 5 "crux", because we got our first good belay in there. Sounds like where our protagonist had his unfortunate fall. I knew a really experienced climber who broke his leg when he caught a crampon on his pants, just getting up from a rest, right at that mountain. Took a helivac to get him out. Of further interesting note, we downclimbed, rapelled the NE butress, and the last rap was off of a slightly rusty (new, in my book) piton, backed up by one of my nuts. My partner (BTW, he displayed a wonderful show of diarhea while roped-up, in what we will call a "high dump"-- pretty funny stuff!) went first, and I stupidly pulled the nut and rapped on the piton only. It was only 20 ft to the bench/ shoulder, so I went for it. Word came out, a week later, that some guy had grabbed a fixed pin climbing the NE butt, and fell to his death. Anyone remember that story? I didn't place the pin, but I'll never rap on a single anything again after that one. I also remember some ya-hoos up there, climbing the NE butt in LL Bean/Rockport loafers, belaying off of a single loose hex. Guess I shouldn't talk, though. I recommend the E face route, I think its a classic. Take a hammer and some small Bugaboos and even small KBs, but expect those as your only peices for three pitches of 4th Class slab. The 5th class was clean, in my shakey memory, but the heather staircase on the summit pyramid was exposed, slippery and wet!
  5. chair peak accident saturday

    In defense of our friend, here, I remeber doing the E. face years ogo. Mostly, I liked the cool drawing in Beckey's guide. It wasn't a whole lot of help, though. We had limited scouting, since the face was covered by a rising fog. When I was sure that it was lifting, I led up the center weakness and found little to no pro, although what I would describe as wonderful rock, about 4th Class. I remember clipping a knifeblade that was hammered down at 90 %, and worked out about halfway! Also remember having opposed small nuts or even micros for the first few "anchors". This experience, and others in the Snoqualmie alps, has taught me to include pitons on my rack in that area. BTW, there's a great crag right there, but a beer would have to be donated to get it out of me... We traversed right to the NE ridge, somewhere under the rockband which is the first class 5 "crux", because we got our first good belay in there. Sounds like where our protagonist had his unfortunate fall. I knew a really experienced climber who broke his leg when he caught a crampon on his pants, just getting up from a rest, right at that mountain. Took a helivac to get him out. Of further interesting note, we downclimbed, rapelled the NE butress, and the last rap was off of a slightly rusty (new, in my book) piton, backed up by one of my nuts. My partner (BTW, he displayed a wonderful show of diarhea while roped-up, in what we will call a "high dump"-- pretty funny stuff!) went first, and I stupidly pulled the nut and rapped on the piton only. It was only 20 ft to the bench/ shoulder, so I went for it. Word came out, a week later, that some guy had grabbed a fixed pin climbing the NE butt, and fell to his death. Anyone remember that story? I didn't place the pin, but I'll never rap on a single anything again after that one. I also remember some ya-hoos up there, climbing the NE butt in LL Bean/Rockport loafers, belaying off of a single loose hex. Guess I shouldn't talk, though. I recommend the E face route, I think its a classic. Take a hammer and some small Bugaboos and even small KBs, but expect those as your only pieces for three pitches of 4th Class slab. The 5th class was clean, in my shakey memory, but the heather staircase on the summit pyramid was exposed, slippery and wet! [ 06-07-2002, 11:24 AM: Message edited by: none ]
  6. Where is the cheapest GU?

    Use brown rice syrup. Get it at the health food stores, next to molasses. It's the #1 ingredient in Clif shots and Clif bars. WAY cheaper than the Gu packs, and almost the same stuff. I snarf it out of an squeeze bottle on all my alpine climbs. Works great! Twight would approve.
  7. On the book promo tour . . . Aussie Greg Child will be at Powell's Hawthorne store on Tuesday 4/30, 7:30 pm plugging his new book on the recent Tommy Caldwell, Beth Roddden et al. kidnapping epic in Kyrgestan (sp?). Lynn will yap about her new book at Powells downtown on May 28, 7:30 pm. BTW, I have read that Greg helped Lynn write her book. (I do not work for Powells or have any affiliation with them - just trying to get the word out on local talks with two climbers I greatly admire - and both in the same month!) Peace, n_s
  8. CHACO SANDALS SIZE 12 MODEL Z/2

    THESE FINE SANDALS ARE BRAND NEW ONLY WORN INDOORS A COUPLE DAYS. THEY ARE BLACK WITH THE TOE STRAP-CAN BE WORN WITH SOCKS OR BAREFOOT. THESE ARE SIZE 12 IN WIDE WIDTH $50 CASH TO TODD -SEE THEM AT FEATHERED FRIENDS OR E-MAIL ME IF ANY QUESTIONS P.S SANDALS HAVE THE BURLY WALKABOUT SOLE FROM VIBRAM
  9. Tents 4 season 2 man

    whutever, dude. I guess some people are the types who always get wet, no matter what. I Don't get wet in ANY of my double wall tents, but I guess if you pitch 'em correctly...Of course, I like to take my SD Superflash (SD version of the Westwind), wall and poles only, and dig it down about 6 in" in the snow-- 3 # mountain tent!Another nice trick, if I'm sloggin' a volcano, is to overstock the climbers in the tent. I've had 7 climbers in my Big Dipper-- dry as toast and less than 2 # per person. [ 04-10-2002: Message edited by: none ]
  10. Tents 4 season 2 man

    If you do go single-wall in the PNW, you WILL get wet, PERIOD. I do in mine (Marmot Insane Asylum). For a rainy or low altitude trip, I'll take a 7 to 10 lb. double wall mountain tent, like my Moss or SD. I just get a chuckle, like it's the big lie: " get a single wall tent, duuude, they're great." No one who owns one will admit the dirty little secret: you can't get the temp. gradient right in the warm PNW. Maybe on McKinley, a single wall would work well... although there I used my little SD Tiros.
  11. Impact study shows climbing damages ecosytems

    A very close friend of mine, (a logger) once told me that if you don't log 'em down (old grow trees), they'll just fall down anyway. This is true, if you think about it. I, for one, (and the great majority of normal americans, thankfully) could care less about your silly cliff ecosystem arguements. I liked the entry that eluded to falling rocks at cliffs being hazardous to your head! Wake up! Mountains are by definition, crumbling apart. The "green" movement is over, and it's time to move on with our lives. BTW, logging is incredible cross training for climbing.. just a thought...
  12. REI's Climbing department

    Good Grief, people-- are there any adults out there? First of all, study up on legal definitions of CO-OPs. They are for profit! Next: in my years of shopping at REI, I remember buying a Chounard Ice Hammer for $40, two Chounard ice screws (brand new) for 3 cents (!!!) apeice, these way rad stretchy fanny packs for 3 cents (!!!) apeice.. the list goes on forever. Maybe attitude blinds one to possilbilities...Here's a news flash: you can order almost any item of climbing gear you want, catalogue, special order, whatever, and get it at a dividend, at REI. Screw the floor stock- you know what you want! Then, if not 100% satisfied, it is returnable. I once returned two Camalots that had split sleeves right behind the swages there, and another 1 that had bad action when new-- try that at some other retailers.I mean, it's not all sunshine and light, but hoot, man-- what are ya' after?And, yes, I have seen Beckey at REI. And Dan Davis, and Royal Robbins, and Pete Schoenig, and Alex Lowe, and Greg Childs, and Ed Viesters, and Don Brooks, and Jim Wickwire, and Lou Whittaker, and Mark Twight, and..... [ 04-03-2002: Message edited by: none ]
  13. veloce tele boots size 28

    for sale: garmont veloce tele boots size 28 (mondo sizing) roughly size l0 l/2 (i wear them tight as i go to size ll in some shoes) $200 cash these boots have only been skied 3 times and i'm selling because i need the cash badly. see them at feathered friends in seattle across from REI or call todd at 206-547-5307. i will be out of town 'til april l4 but you can always try boots on at my shop-feathered friends. thanks, my email if any questions is toddlerinseattle@hotmail.com
  14. easy meals

    #1 ingredient in Clif bars and Clif Shots (Gu): brown rice syrup. Buy a jar of BRS for about $2.50 at the local health food store (right next to the molasses), pour into a plastic squeeze bottle, and you have a Gu stand in for way cheap. I use it on all my longer climbs and I know it keeps my legs moving all day. Keep it in an inside pocket so it stays more liquid. Great stuff!
  15. Bishop/Yosemite Driving tips

    Check out Travertine Hot Springs, about a mile off 395 just south of Bridgeport CA. Inquire locally. Nice free camping nearby and a great spring. Nice stop either heading down, back or both! Alos, a lot of great springs outside Bishop. Ask any local and they can tell you where.
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