Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
eternalX

Winter Climbing

Recommended Posts

While climbing during a full moon gives the benefit of night vision it has been said and exemplified that avalanch occurances tend to be more frequent during that period. Magnetic pull or something similar that a layman such as myself would never fully comprehend. The big Canook avie tragedy last year happened during a full moon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hm, that is definitely something to think about. my main reason for going at that time (besides night visibility) is that there usually seems to be a bit of clear weather around a full moon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, this is true. There is a statistically significant better chance of having clear weather during a full moon than during other phases of the moon. I have never heard about the avalanche hypothesis and I don't believe it. The moon does not exert a magnetic pull on the earth.

Edited by danielpatricksmith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, this is true. There is a statistically significant better chance of having clear weather during a full moon than during other phases of the moon.

Source? I've never heard of this connection at all. Statistically "significant?" Since the entire Earth experiences the same moon phase at any given time, that means that global weather is better every 28 days?

 

The moon does not exert a magnetic pull on the Earth, but it exerts a powerful gravitational pull (see "tides"). The avalanche link has at least been studied a bit, but I've never seen any solid conclusions published.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The moon exerts a powerful gravitational pull on the earth folks. This is how tides are formed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Source? I've never heard of this connection at all. Statistically "significant?" Since the entire Earth experiences the same moon phase at any given time, that means that global weather is better every 28 days?

 

 

 

I'll try to dig up a reference.

Edited by danielpatricksmith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This from http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf046/sf046p15.htm

 

"Another precipitating factor may be the gravitational pull of the moon. In research published last year, Peter Lev of the Utah Highway Department found that based on a statistical study of moon and avalanche cycles in the Wasatch Mountains during the past 20 years, the chance of an avalanche's occurring on a full and new moon was 100 times greater than it is during other days in the lunar cycle."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm, the article does not say what Journal the research was published in nor does it give any idea of the 'statistical' tests used. Any time a round number like 100 times is bandied about, my bullshit meter goes off. I am very skeptical as to the validity of the study. And once again children, correlation does not equal causation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I can't remember hearing of this phenomena in any avalanche course, seminar or text book. Seems like an increase in avalanche occurrance of ONE HUNDRED TIMES is pretty significant and might have recieved at least a footnote.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The gravitational force of the moon is obviously very strong, and it is accentuated when it is "full" ---lined up with the sun, so that they exert forces together (hence the highest "spring" tides).

 

I think that some scientists also believe that volcanic activity can be activated by the moon's force, the theory being that oftentimes it only takes small "triggers" to snap geologic formations that are on the verge of movement or change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is clear statistical proof that crime rates go up during a full moon. Maybe the additional avalanches are being triggered by criminals. That would explain all the chewed through food bags and the little turds in my gorp too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
..... the chance of an avalanche's occurring on a full and new moon was 100 times greater than it is during other days in the lunar cycle."

 

Are we to believe then, that the avy hazard is 100x greater on the day of the full moon than it is on the last day of a waxing gibbous phase?? Or the first day of the waining? rolleyes.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hell boys, screw the winter climb. How about we set up a really nice prospective, randomized study of the effect of the full moon on unstable snow surfaces. It's a pity we can't control the phase of the moon or we could blind the study too! Then, instead of climbing next spring, we could get it published in a peer reviewed journal like Science or Nature. Sounds like more fun than climbing anyway. rolleyes.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×