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Kiwi

RMI, is it any good?

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G'day, mates! ^_^wave.gif

 

I plan on picking up mountaineering this summer, but I was distraught--to say the least--when I found out that most schools closed registration all the way back in Feb!! frown.gif I've wanted to learn mountaineering for over a year, but only started planning in May. I didn't realise reg starts that early.

 

So someone suggested RMI (Rainier Mountaineering Inc) and--surprise surprise--they have classes open all summer! Wicked! cool.gif I plan on taking the Three Day Summit Climb ($771).

 

So question is, is RMI any good? Is it a touristy guided summit climb, or will I learn some lead climbing techniques?

 

Grazie. smile.gif

Edited by Kiwi

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RMI has some of the best guides in the biz. Check your numbers, though. $771 is the price for the summit climb where you won't learn jack. $1152 is the price for the five day seminar that looks like what you're looking for.

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I have to sign up for the Camp Muir Seminar? frown.gif The next class is June 9-13. I have finals that week. And the next class after that is all the way in Sept!! Bugger all!

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Agree that RMI guides are top notch. They get a lot of flack because they have a monopoly on Rainier though. Anyway, the $771 is your 3 day summit climb. The first day is a hike and some rudimentary self-arrest and rope travel practice. The next day is the hike up to Muir. The 3rd day is summit day.

 

If you want to learn moutaineering though, have you considered Alpine Ascents International? They have classes and seminars throughout the season.

 

Using commercial guides though to learn the ropes can be a bit spendy. As much as most folks on this site hate them, have you considered The Mountaineers? Classes start in January. I'd say it's a great introduction to climbing and cheap too at just $220. Another option would be Washington Alpine Club.

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I've looked at Alpine Ascents International, Washington Alpine Club, and The Mountaineers, and all of them closed registration way back in February. Makes no sense, why don't they have classes open during summer?! Bastards! madgo_ron.gif

 

Edit: Nevermind, I checked out Alpine Ascents again, and yes they're open all season long. $990 for six days. (Cheaper than the 6-day Camp Muir Seminar offered by RMI) I'm trying to avoid a six consecutive day thingy because I'd have to request vacation time and I don't think they'd like me to ask for a vacation 3 weeks into work. blush.gif (Not sure if I even have 5 days of vacation time)

 

We'll see. Thanks for the help ya'll.

Edited by Kiwi

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First off, you will not learn a damn thing on RMI's summit climb, or most any other company's summit climb. These climbs are focused on getting a non-mountaineering type to stand on a summit. A one time deal. A ride, no knowledge required.

 

If you actually want to learn mountaineering, and are cool with using a guide service/school, then look into taking a 5-6 day glacier mountaineering course. The 13-day Alpine Climbing courses are the most comprehensive and give you the best bang for your buck.

 

Call Mark Gunglogson at M2: 206-937-8389

 

Mountain Madness

 

This is not to say that RMI isn't a good operation. But the summit climbs are just that, summit climbs.

 

AAI is also a good company.

 

Call around and get familar with the companies and thier differences. Look closely at what you get for you buck. i.e. Some do not include food, and make you bring and pay for your own food. Some include food in the total price.

 

Keep your focus on learning, not just summiting.

 

Good luck.

 

bigdrink.gif

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It's unfortunate, but all too many people don't start thinking about climbing until the good summer weather arrives. Almost all the climbing courses start in the early spring or even winter, so they can get all the lectures and field trips out of the way in time for the students to go do their experience climbs in the summer.

 

Kiwi, what I would do if I were you is hang out with some cc.com folks and learn some rock climbing skills this summer. Maybe join JGowans on his Adams slog this weekend, then sign up for some alpine course for the 2004 season.

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Dude....listen to Figger 8......spend a few extra shekels on the 5 day seminar. you will actually learn something and climb Rainier! I took one of them things 25 years ago and it was a great start. we were based out of Camp Muir where we went ice climbing, did crevasse rescue, glacier travel plus self-arrest, of course. And you're up there on Mt. Rainier which is the best part. The summit day was easier because we'd been up at 10,000 feet for almost 4 days.

you won't learn much on the three day climb except self-arrest, and a few pointers. The 3-day climbs are mostly for people who just want to climb Rainier as some sort of goal so you don't tend to find a lot of people serious about climbing in there. However, people in the seminars, which are a lot smaller, are there to learn the mountain skills.

I have a few issues with the way RMI does this and that, but I think you'll get your money's worth.

Also, American Alpine Institute is good, and you'll probably learn a lot more, but again....Mt. Rainier!!!

Good luck! Dwayner

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Yeah... :-\ Wish I had known earlier. Like I said, I've been waiting since last summer. frown.gif

 

I plan on taking rock climbing as well. At least those are open year round.

 

Slog? confused.gifblush.gif

 

Invite? Cool! That's one of the reasons I signed up for this site. I know how difficult it is to find a climbing partner. But... I'm busy this weekend with school. It's bloody finals week! madgo_ron.gif I'll be training this weekend though, in between studying. I'll check the fitness section for pointers.

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Try Pro Guiding Service or

Mountain Madness

 

Martin Volken at Pro Guiding Service is one of the best guides in the area and has courses all the time. He can probably throw something together for you if he doesn't have something set up already.

 

Mountain Madness has courses all summer long too, I think.

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Private guide services are pricey. If you can afford it, that's great. If not, pick up a few books, read, practice, learn to use a compass and find a few friends on the board who will take you out on some lower elevation stuff where the stakes aren't quite so high.

 

When you can snatch the pebble from my hand and walk across ricepaper and leave no trace, it will be your time to climb a large volcano yellaf.gif

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did you see that sattelite photo that was posted yesterday?

Did you see how many mountains there are North of the

lil purple line marking the 49th Parallel?

 

Check out some canadian guiding companies ...

Canada West Mountain School, Whistler Alpine Guide Bureau,

Slipstream Adventure, even Squamish Rock Guides... they all

have webpages. They are all accredited. They are usually very

amenable to catering their courses to what the clients want

because they aren't running high volume concession outfits.

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Alright, re-reading the responses again, I get the impression people here don't think too much about climbing schools. dunno.gif So how did most of ya'll learn to climb?

 

Seems like I'll have to go with the 6 day courses to really learn how to climb. Thanks again for the info. Now I know what to do next year.

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Kiwi said:

Alright, re-reading the responses again, I get the impression people here don't think too much about climbing schools. dunno.gif So how did most of ya'll learn to climb?

 

Hooked up with more experienced persons and learned from them.

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Kiwi,

 

I work for Cascade Alpine Guides and we run 4 1/2 day trips on the Emmons Glacier, they include all the food and cooking, and a summit bid. As much instruction as the weather allows and way to much fun. I think there are a few spots left for the summer. I believe the price is around 1150$$ with all group gear provided.

Cascadealpine.com

 

Dale Remsberg

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If you learn through a club it will take longer but you will meet a lot of people. From this lot you can find partners that you like for climbing with after the class is over. Don't rush, wait till next year and save your money. The mountains will still be there. We get together and bigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gif every Tuesday, stay tuned for this weeks location.

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Dave_Schuldt said:

If you learn through a club it will take longer but you will meet a lot of people.

Take longer? confused.gif That's not good...

 

Right now, I'm leaning towards going up with people--maybe some from this board if they'd have me. cool.gif But I won't be [physically] ready for two weeks. It fits my busy schedule and costs less.

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Fence_Sitter said:

1150$$

 

holy shit! i think my trips usually run about $11.50 yellaf.gif

 

no kidding! $11.50 including gas to get there!

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minx said:

Fence_Sitter said:

1150$$

 

holy shit! i think my trips usually run about $11.50 yellaf.gif

 

no kidding! $11.50 including gas to get there!

 

cars are aid! ask erden! rockband.gifbigdrink.gif

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Fence_Sitter said:

minx said:

Fence_Sitter said:

1150$$

 

holy shit! i think my trips usually run about $11.50 yellaf.gif

 

no kidding! $11.50 including gas to get there!

 

cars are aid! ask erden! rockband.gifbigdrink.gif

 

yelrotflmao.gif

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Here's another plug for an RMI Expedition Seminar. I attended one in June 2000 and it was a great experience; I found the guides (Lisa Rust, Anne Keller, and Adam Clarke) to be professional, knowledgeable, and personable. The equipment was good stuff in excellent shape and the food was pretty good too.

 

The Expedition Seminar allowed a lot more time to learn the more than rudimentary skills plus we got to spend five beautiful days on Mt. Rainier!

 

We were rest-stepping up the Muir Snowfield with our 65 lb. packs when we passed an RMI Summit Seminar group who was taking a rest stop on their way to Camp Muir. They looked hurried and tired, and some were looking pretty green due to their rapid ascent to altitude--and this was only at 9,600'!

 

After the descent, our guides accompanied us to the Glacier Pub at the Paradise Inn and quaffed ales with us in good fashion. bigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.gif Truly an outstanding experience!

 

Go for the Expedition Seminar if you can--anyone can be dragged to the summit kicking and screaming!

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