Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Gregory.S.

getting rid of the softshell

Recommended Posts

In hopes of shedding a little weight I picked up a nano puff pullover that was on sale. I had hoped that I would be able to use it to replace a soft shell in many conditions that I would be wearing a soft shell and an R2. For the most part soft shells seem to be really heavy and I would like to due away with mine. Windshirt and nano? Light soft shell? Any other experiences with this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To clarify, I would be using the nano puff as a mid and outer layer (nano puff and possibly a wind shirt , instead of softshell + r2).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sure you throw it in on the dyer on high for 15 minutes or so to get full value from it.

 

But a great piece to replace a soft shell as long as you aren't dragging them against rock. The Nano will be warmer, lighter and easier to dry out. The Nano makes a great mid layer or an outer layer.

 

Some lengthy discussion in the gear review forum recently with e the Nano as part of a winter clothing system. More on the Nano specifically on the blog as well.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I like using the r3 as an outer layer in dry conditions. It actually breaths quite well. Then, I usually have a synthetic puffy in my backpack, along with a shell. Pretty much an unstoppable combination.

In wet conditions, I'll throw on a soft or hard shell, depending on what type of climbing I'm doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a stretch woven softshell. Like most of Seattle, I enjoy wearing it on the bus to work. So much more handsome than a hardshell. While climbing, I wear a Marmot DriClime windshirt. It is lighter, more compressible, warmer, windproof, resists light precipitation and layers better as the nylon shell allows fleece or other insulation pieces to slide against it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love my OR Ferrosi softshell hoody. Just light Schoeller (which should need no introduction I hope), no hype. Really great in wide variety of conditions when in motion. Very light weight. I was out BC skiing in a MH powerstretch hoody and a Ferrosi all day yesterday from 5000' down to 1300' - sun, fog, light grappel, drizzle...comfy, comfy.

 

Its true that most softshells are too heavy for most conditions, and thus don't breath well enough to do the job for which they were intended, which is to keep you moving in variable conditions without having to change layers.

 

The layer I leave at home most of the time? A hardshell.

 

Can't really imagine trying to move around for very long in any kind of puffy unless its dipping into the teens or really blowing. And you gotta love an outer layer that can't survive any abrasion. Yeah...I never crash through brush or anything in the Cascades....

Edited by tvashtarkatena

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Love my OR Ferrosi softshell hoody. Just light Schoeller (which should need no introduction I hope), no hype. Really great in wide variety of conditions when in motion.

 

Its true that most softshells are too heavy for most conditions, and thus don't breath well enough to do the job for which they were intended, which is to keep you moving in variable conditions without having to change layers.

 

I think you are spot-on with this observation. It seems like since such a large majority of the consuming public demands only waterproof jackets or wanders into the store and asks for goretex/waterproof/etc, designers at most companies basically started making heavier and more waterproof "softshells" which basically resulted in something they could market and sell but didn't work for much more than an around-town nice-looking rain jacket. These "soft hard-shells" are really heavy and not particularly more breathable than Goretex, nor as water and wind proof.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's also mildy amusing that the industry has taken $40, 1977 era Sears sleeping bags and resewn them into $250 'synthetic insulation'. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for recycling cheap plastic as many times as you can squeeze value out of it. The COG on those things is about a dollar, however, and their loft holds up about like you'd expect a dollar jacket would.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all of the replies, some good advice. I wanted to save weight but I am looking at the patagonia traverse jacket now which is pretty light weight, not too bad to just throw in the pack to give that extra option of base layer + softshell or base layer + shoftshell + nano if its cold but not freezing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Make sure you throw it in on the dyer on high for 15 minutes or so to get full value from it.

 

But a great piece to replace a soft shell as long as you aren't dragging them against rock. The Nano will be warmer, lighter and easier to dry out. The Nano makes a great mid layer or an outer layer.

 

Some lengthy discussion in the gear review forum recently with e the Nano as part of a winter clothing system. More on the Nano specifically on the blog as well.

 

 

I don't want to get off topic too far, but I'm curious about this comment. I use a nano pullover in my layering system (base layer + r1 + nano or whatever. I'm a patagonia whore). I suppose my biggest concern on putting the jacket on high is melting it? But would it increase loft? Is this good practice for synthetic jackets (I only own a FF Daybreak jacket I usually use for around camp. Too warm for this area most the time)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was wondering about that too!

 

Steve House's suggestion with the Primaloft DAS actually. He is also a Patagonia ambassador so the suggestion isn't coming out of the blue. Few minutes in a drier for the DAS or the Nano puffs works wonders. Any primaloft garment I suspect as the heat allows the filaments to uncrinkle a bit and loft up from manufacturing. I found out on the Nano by washing and drying one of two new ones I have. Ended up washing and drying one of them several times during the last big storm cycle here. The difference in loft between the new unworn one and the used one was measurable. So I chucked the new one in the drier for 15 minutes as well and same end result, more loft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I use a marmot driclime windshirt for most everything, and if its cold/really windy I'll put on a membrain shell (the hyper). Though it's a 'shell', its stretchy and super breathable like a softshell, but has the wind and precip blocking properties of a hardshell (and only weights 13oz too)! My nano-weight (60g synthetic) hoody is just too warm to move in over that combo, unless its really cold out. Whatever works for ya..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my Marmot driclime hooded windshirt. The only down-side for me is that I'm between a medium and a large. Went up so it gets a bit noisy in the wind. I use it in the mountains and on my bike commute when temps are cool and rain isn't a concern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I love my Marmot driclime hooded windshirt. The only down-side for me is that I'm between a medium and a large. Went up so it gets a bit noisy in the wind. I use it in the mountains and on my bike commute when temps are cool and rain isn't a concern.

 

Oh man, they make a hooded version?! I always wondered...surprisingly rain has never been a concern- even after a short deluge, the jacket is soaked, but I'm not...of course a good dwr treatment never hurts :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my ultralight cotton golfing jacket, a 1977 Olympia thrift-store purchase, & much like the famous British Anoraks of 1950s, though with a handy steel zipper, which adds versatility.

 

Given its design, it doesn't interfere with my climbing harness and when fully iced-up, is 100% windproof.

 

It goes with my Icelandic balaclava, knitted by certified Viking retards, and my Korean War-era poncho, still going strong until a few years ago & useful for hiding valued trash in back seat of junker car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to report something. I bought the patagonia traverse soft shell (50% off) last week. It is ultra thin and not super protective but by far the lightest weight "soft shell" I have ever come across. I might not use it to replace my nano puff but use it in conjunction with an r2. Definitely worth the money if you can find it for less than 80$.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought two hooded softshells this year: OR Ferrosi (same weight as Patagonia above...as light as you can get) and a MH Mercurial.

 

After overnighting in several midwinter blizzards - cabins, tents, snowcaves - I haven't really needed the heavier Mercurial (it's GREAT around town, though). The Ferrosi with 1 to 3 light layers underneath has kept me comfy and amazingly dry, even after hours of driving spindrift at near freezing. It's turning out to be one of the best pieces of clothing I've ever had.

 

Schoeller fabric. Accept no substitute.

 

 

Edited by tvashtarkatena

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree that Schoeller fabric is amazing. Worth every penny. On softshells, I think softshells really shine when its wet conditions close to freezing and the wet seeps thru your outer shell. Seems not needed as much and restrictive when its colder. I will wear a softshell sometimes when there might be light rain or mist, and I don't want to carry 2 jackets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We were skiing deep pow for 3 days in the teens and twenties this weekend. That softshell was the perfect outerlayer for it!

 

I don't quite understand softshells without hoods, though.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand the sentiment but it takes a lot for me to want to wear a protective hood. By the time that happened I would just wear a hard shell anyways.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×