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RuMR

kid training?

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let the kids be kids and just play and have fun. they can get a real job when they're not kids anymore. so for training just climbing at their ability is going to be best, anything else you might be over working developing tendons, muscles, etc.

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Playing is the best work out for kids.

Playing is the best teacher for kids.

 

Playing is what kids do best.

 

Playing is what kids are for.

 

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When I was 12 my coach started pushing me too hard, trying to get me on hard 12's and 13's and stuff and It sucked and I stopped climbing for a while.. dont push kids

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i'd agree, but only if your kid doesn't wanna train. if he's psyched on his own, then i think pretty much everything an older humanoid would do, minus campusing perhaps? i'd read One Move Too Many. it talks about kids and training. pretty important stuff about development and such.

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any suggestions on turning kids into super-beasts?

 

Let's hear 'em!

 

 

look, RuMR has his very own forum.

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i'd agree, but only if your kid doesn't wanna train. if he's psyched on his own, then i think pretty much everything an older humanoid would do, minus campusing perhaps? i'd read One Move Too Many. it talks about kids and training. pretty important stuff about development and such.

 

Campusing is easier for kids, I could campus some of the indoor climbs in Abotsford and not get pumped cuz I was so light

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When I was 12 my coach started pushing me too hard, trying to get me on hard 12's and 13's and stuff and It sucked and I stopped climbing for a while.. dont push kids

 

cheam, why did you have a coach if you didn't want to get pushed?

 

i agree that playing is the best way for kids (and adults) to improve, especially in a gym setting. simply climbing more with a focus on good technique goes a long ways. as long as the overall theme is to have fun.

 

adding a twist to normal climbing that makes them think about what they're doing and help improve a technique or strength can be fun too.

 

for example: find a section of wall and traverse it. then traverse it with only their left and and agin with only the right. this will build contact strength and learn to control the swing of a dynamic move without the intimmidation of a full-on dyno.

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also, a book called "couching climbing" has a ton of good climbing exercises to use specifically with kids.

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campus? i never went to college ;)

hey pink,

 

why don't you go spray somewhere, anywhere, else?

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When I was 12 my coach started pushing me too hard, trying to get me on hard 12's and 13's and stuff and It sucked and I stopped climbing for a while.. dont push kids

 

cheam, why did you have a coach if you didn't want to get pushed?

 

i agree that playing is the best way for kids (and adults) to improve, especially in a gym setting. simply climbing more with a focus on good technique goes a long ways. as long as the overall theme is to have fun.

 

adding a twist to normal climbing that makes them think about what they're doing and help improve a technique or strength can be fun too.

 

for example: find a section of wall and traverse it. then traverse it with only their left and and agin with only the right. this will build contact strength and learn to control the swing of a dynamic move without the intimmidation of a full-on dyno.

cheam was on a competitive climbing team...i climbed alot with a kid who took nationals, and he too burned out...

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Sorry, I got that he was a competition climber. I guess I should have asked: Why, if you were burnt out, did you continue to be on a team? It would be interesting to hear if there would have been something that would have kept you motivated or if you would have been done with it even if you hadn't been pushed too hard by someone else. Maybe some time off?

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any suggestions on turning kids into super-beasts?

 

Let's hear 'em!

 

a) Don't buy them a video game console

 

b) Don't let them spend too much time with friends that have VG console

 

c) If you've already done "a", either take it away, or limit to a certain number of hours a week.

 

 

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Sorry, I got that he was a competition climber. I guess I should have asked: Why, if you were burnt out, did you continue to be on a team? It would be interesting to hear if there would have been something that would have kept you motivated or if you would have been done with it even if you hadn't been pushed too hard by someone else. Maybe some time off?

 

well, considering that he won the canadian youth nationals, i think prolly time off would be apropriate.

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Sorry, I got that he was a competition climber. I guess I should have asked: Why, if you were burnt out, did you continue to be on a team? It would be interesting to hear if there would have been something that would have kept you motivated or if you would have been done with it even if you hadn't been pushed too hard by someone else. Maybe some time off?

 

well, considering that he won the canadian youth nationals, i think prolly time off would be apropriate.

 

He should use some of his prize money for some Avalanche education classes

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This discussion is kind of interesting. I don't have any kids, but I grew up in a house with a bunch of pictures of my dad off on some crazy glacier up in Canada. I used to love looking at those pictures, and as a kid it inspired me to think, "when I get big I'm doing that."

 

I started my climbing by hiking then scrambling. I think the first things I ever climbed were Mt. Ruth and Mt. Daniel at about age 10 or so.

 

Crag climbing was always presented to me as something to do to train for the real thing that being mountain climbing.

 

Anyway things are different now. It's nice to see you folks taking your kids out climbing at a crag or wherever.

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My kids like to dabble with the rock, but are not fully motivated to climb it. I have found that, like on anything else, it just comes down to the motivation. Next time out I am going to pre-climb the route and leave candy on a bunch of the holds and they can climb all over like an egg-hunt. Seems to be the best motivation for trying new moves that I have come up with.

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Doing simple workouts like frenchies or the 10 min. fingerboard workout helped a lot in improving my strength. Alos it is VERY important to learn technique BEFORE strength. That way they won't power through moves like me .

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also, a book called "couching climbing" has a ton of good climbing exercises to use specifically with kids.
Why would anyone want to climb a couch?

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