Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Tad

When you carry it, what camera gear do you carry>

Recommended Posts

I'd like to hear what sort of cameras, lenses, film and gear anyone carries on their climbs (when they choose to haul it).

APS? 35mm: SLR, rangefinder? Larger formats? Digital? Lenses? Film: print or slide? What's your bomber system?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still shoot 35mm slides. Mainly Fuji Velvia. You can't beat the color although it may not be as sharp as print film for enlargements.

Although an SLR is surely the way to go, you'll take more good shots at critical moments with a good quality point and shoot with a fast and sharp lens. It should also have manual exposure overrides for bright snow conditions.

I love my Ricoh GR1. It is a bit pricey, but at 6 oz I've always had it when I needed it. Its 28mm lens is a bit wide for spectacular backgroud shots, but it is great for getting the whole group on the summit. I also have an older Olympus XA. You might be able to find a used one for about $125-$150. Great little camera. Some might disagree with me but I believe with a P&S camera you get what you pay for.

I bought a Nikon N80 (SLR) last year and love it! The matrix metering is flawless. A real smooth and "ergonomic" camera. 19 oz body, and 9 oz for a 50mm f1.4 lens....kind of heavy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Climbing and photograpy is a new thing most climbers just take snap shots and don't really want to spend the time to set up a good pic. In climbing there are alot of pros and cons. If you do alot of winter climbing bring a manunal cammra there for it will not freeze up on you, on been there done that. If you want excellent pictures get a meduim format but very heavy and takes a lot of time. the automatic cammars are great but if you are just getting started you tend not to see or understand how the cammra is seeing. I used to use fm10 by nikion really light and not very durrable. but works great. one problem with it is that you have to take very good care of it and you just cant through your pack around every where. as for lens I take three 28, 50 and 100 fixed legths by doing so you get beter

pictures. I right now I use a pentax k1000 do to fact that my main cammra was stolen its a great climbing cammra too.

Though I would sugest a range finder it will take pictures almost as good as a meduim format but it takes along time maunal to use. A question you might want to ask you self is do you want quality over quantity?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

35mm cameras seem to be the best for compactness and the widest range of film. APS is a nice idea but certainly has its limitations IMHO.

I've carried many different cameras into the mountains: an old Kodak Retina IIIc, a bomber Nikon F2 with a 35mm and a 105mm lens; a compact Rollie 35; an old medium format Rollie and lately and old Leica IIIa rangefinder with a "normal" collapsing lens. All reliable mechanical cameras that do well in the cold. But I always take my Olympus Stylus Epic with the fixed f2.8 lens. Without worry I can toss it in the top pocket of my pack or side pocket of my pants and almost always get great results. But I do have to worry about the battery with it.

For film I've used Fuji Provia, Velvia and the Sensia with great slide results. I also fool around with black and white film. I've resisted trying digital due to having to worry about batteries. Same goes for a flash (excluding my Olympus Stylus Epic). smile.gif" border="0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got an older HP Photosmart C200 Digital.

One of the first digitals that were affordable, but it is only 1.2MB. What's so incredible is I take it everywhere, and it survives.

Frozen, wet, dropped, you name it, it has seen it. Not good quality images, but I dont have to worry about losing or breaking it, kind of like Gas Station Sunglasses u know? wink.gif" border="0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone know of a point and shoot that lets you push your film?

I use a Olympus Stylus for most everything except skiing (and even there too sometimes). I also shoot Provia & Kodak slides but I find that they usually come out too dark/blue. I know that Provia F is a little heavier on the blues, but I think it's more of a need to over-expose. I get great results with the "constant push" of my Cannon Rebel on snow, but I don't like it's size limitations.

Thus, it would be nice to have a manual PNS ("point and shoot" for those of you with sick minds grin.gif" border="0 ). Probably too much to ask for. Maybe I should just go in for a Yashika...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like digital. They were discussed here two weeks ago, and some said that they quality just isn't there for digital cameras yet, but I have been climbing with buddies carrying digital cameras for the last two years and it seems to me the small ones are very easy to carry around and take quite adequate shots for most of us (I have published one of my photos only once and I rarely blow them up to hang on the wall, so perhaps I am not the guy to ask if you are truly into quality). I recently purchased one and yes, there is some learning involved - but no more than learning to use a new rangefinder or even a point and shoot (all cameras have their quirks).

It is fun to be able to look at your shots while you are still in the field, and you don't have to wait for them to be developed when you get home - just download to your computer. And even a 2megapixel camera can take remarkably clear photos that blow up to 6x9 with results that my eyes cannot tell from a slide reprinted at that size. It depends what you are into, and if you have aspirations of selling your photos, if you are going on an expedition, or if you are going out into the real cold you may not want a digital (for backcountry skiing I just tuck the camera into my coat and it works just fine) . But for casual shooting I doubt I'll go back to analog.

Here is the recent thread:

http://www.cascadeclimbers.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=9&t=000260

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dbb,You might try attaching a suitable neutral density (ND) filter over the exposure metering eye of your point and shoot. This would trick the camera to expose the film the way you'd like. I know, it sounds like a "chewing gum and shoelace" set up but it would work.

As for the Yashica T4, I'm not impressed with the camera. The Zeiss lens is'nt what it's cracked up to be. My Olympus Stylus gives sharper pics! The T4 is on the bulky side for pocket carry and the flip down lens protector is lame. In my humble opinion the Olympus is a better snap shooter over the Yashica.

Digitally speaking, I've thought about getting a slide scanner to digitize pics. Yea it's more work and expensive in the long run probably but I'm still not sold on the digital cameras yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can only carry one camera (e.g. for technical climbing), get a good point and shoot. My vote is for the Yashica T4. Had mine for 3 years, its been ice climbing and winter mountaineering and I've never had a problem with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by freeclimb9:
Yashica T4

Actually, the T4 doesn't allow you to set manual exposure, or use exposure compensation, which is a big problem for snow & ice photos. I switched to using print film in that camera because of this - you just can't get consistent results with slide film if you don't have exposure control (I know, I could carry some ND filters, etc...). Otherwise, the T4 does take great photos, but now I have mostly switched over to using a digicam for 'point-n-shoot' stuff. Although I can't make enlargements to the same degree as the T4, I get better exposures, and mostly these pictures are for the web anyway.

If I decide to lug around a big camera, I use a Mamiya 7 medium format. It isn't any heavier that most modern motorized 35mm SLR's (about 3LBS), but takes pictures that put 35mm to shame of course. Also since its a rangefinder, you can often take handheld pics at shutter speeds where you'd need a tripod for an SLR. In this camera I usually use Kodak E100VS film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always take a cammera with me on every trip. I use one of three cammeras the most common is my Minolta maxim SLR. Relativly cheap auto focus body with a good lens. The reason I use this is because if you are going to take good action shots your cammera will get beat up (because it will be hanging around your neck most of the time). I have a Nikon FN2M fully manual cammera also. I dont use this as much. I also use a point and shoot (again with a good quality lens).I definatly do not agree with the manual cammera in winter idea. You end up taking crappy out of focus shots. I took both the point and shoot and the minolta to Alaska and had great results with the Minolta. When you are in very cold condtions The veiw finder will fog up the instant you get your eye close to it making impossible to get good focus. Never keep your cammera in your jacket when it is cold. Keep it in a plastic bag in you pack or around your neck (keep the batteries in your pocket and take a lot with you). Simply put I would get an autofocus SLR and not belive that they dont work in the cold, they do. You can go to www.nwclimber.com and navigate to the Mt. Foraker page and see pictures shot with the Minolta (there are some point and shoot pics in there too). All of the earlier climbing pics are shot with a point and shoot. You see the obvious qulity difference between the two cammeras. As far a film... Fuji Velvia slide film is what I use. Very sharp and good color. Enlarges great. Print film enlargements suck. and always are grainy as hell.

OK thats my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually bring an old Olympus OM-PC with two lenses: a 50mm and a 28-200 zoom. Typically I start the day (in the dark or near dark) with the 50mm because of the better F-stop, and then switch to the zoom at the summit and for the descent. For years I've left it set at -1 exposure, based what Galan Rowell says, for getting richer colors.I also have an Olympus stylus P&S, and it's more compact, but sort of frustrating to shoot with.

My compliments to anyone who can get reliable results out of a disposable camera -- I buy one each year for RAMROD, and out of 18 or so shots, I get about three worth keeping. (Got an okay one of Dwayner as his CAMROD avatar last summer!)

[ 02-04-2002: Message edited by: Alpine Tom ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Mountaineers who on almost every climb lead you along at the kind of pace that discourages you from stopping to relieve yourself, let alone stopping to actually take a picture" Are you kidding? In my experience they bairly move. If they moved any slower on glaciers they would acctually move away from the summit due to the speed of the glacier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by payaso:
I've seen some people with a kind of funky "chest harness" for their SLR and am interested in trying something like this. When strapped on, it is a real camera bag (PROTECTION!) more or less right under your chin. If I have to take off the pack to get the shot, the shot too often doesn't get taken. I personally use a Canon A2. Anyone out there use a harness-like camera bag, and if so what kind?

I got a "wedge-shaped" camera bag last summer based on the recommendation of someone on this site. He said to clip it directly to the straps of my pack with mini-biners. I tried that but it bounced annoyingly every step. So now I just wear it with the strap diagonally, underneath the pack, and it's right there. It's pretty secure, dry, and readily accessible.Mine is from Lowe, and they have an optional strap that goes around your chest to hold the bag in place, but the pack does just fine for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also like the slightly faster lens of the Olympus over the slower T4. Sub-compact P&S cameras are a bit more prone to being too light shocked.gif" border="0 thus sometimes producing blurry results due to camera shake.

Disposables are certainly better than nothing if your real camera craps out! One time I had a shutter jam early on during a Rainier climb and didn't get any pics above 10,000' mad.gif" border="0

I completly agree about keeping a camera out of your coat in the cold. I read a few articles about condensation damage to lenses as well as cameras if one is not careful.

Anyone else play around with black & white film up high?

In the end, regardless of your system (be it disposable, P&S, APS, 35mm or larger) a little knowledge about composition goes a long way for picture. smile.gif" border="0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still lug my 20+ year old Pentax K-1000 with a 50-mm lens. I sometimes carry my 70 - 210 zoom with me. On snow I usually underexpose by a stop or two and have some pretty good results. My wife usually buys me Kodak 200 ASA print film. I buy Fuji, I think the colors on the Fuji are nicer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Disposables for me. They are very limited but if you respect the limitations you can do ok with them. A little duct tape and a short QD and it hangs anywhere. I rarely get more than one or two shots i really like out of a roll no matter what im using. And i like not worrying about the darn thing. But i just want to remember the climbs and who i was with. I'll never get one in a magazine tho i do know a shot that would make it if someone got it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had a Nikon N70 for about a year and a half now, It's pretty light for an SLR and I just use a cheap 28-80 zoom (I wont cry too mcuh if I have to replace it) and a 50mm. I also usually carry a small aps camera that has seen better days, but refuses to take the kind of pictures that would make me have to replace it...And If weight is not an issue I also carry a tripad and a manual camera, lately I have been using my grampa's old minolta sr-202, it's heavy but works great! I use either the velvia or Kodak's new select slide film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pentax 90 zoom. It goes from 35 to 90, a pretty good range for climbing. Slides come out awesome, prints ok. It has a remote so you can take summit shots without having to run around with the timer going. It's a little heavy, but the features and durability make up for it. It is waterproof and can take getting knocked around. I can operate it with on hand while hanging with the other from an ice tool! I carry it by the strap around my neck inside my jacket. With one hand I can unzip, pull it out, aim it, fondle some buttons, make it go in and out and create some memorable moments to last a lifetime!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Olympus XA I referred to earlier is not really a P&S. It is a rangefinder. I have had great results though. It has exposure compensation under the body in the form of a +1.5 switch. I use this switch in bright afternoon snow or water. Otherwise I let the meter (aperature priority) do the work and don't second guess. I saw a good used one a couple months ago at R&K Photo in Auburn. If you're looking for good used gear I recommend this place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a lot of great photographers out there if you are using Velvia (the color can't be beat!) When climbing though, I have usually been focused on the current "problem" and find photography to be something I forget about (also most of my climbing experience has been through the Mountaineers who on almost every climb lead you along at the kind of pace that discourages you from stopping to relieve yourself, let alone stopping to actually take a picture.) Point and shoot folks don't usually care too much but once you know what you'll get with an SLR (and I can only imagine with a Medium format) you won't want to use a disposable. I've seen some people with a kind of funky "chest harness" for their SLR and am interested in trying something like this. When strapped on, it is a real camera bag (PROTECTION!) more or less right under your chin. If I have to take off the pack to get the shot, the shot too often doesn't get taken. I personally use a Canon A2. Anyone out there use a harness-like camera bag, and if so what kind?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×