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jhc

Lightweight summer mountaineering boots

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Time for new boots. I want to find the perfect boots for spring and summer mountaineering but also for backpacking and long hikes. So.....fairly light weight, not too bulky, still stiff enough to work well with crampons, and should last forever.

 

Any suggestions? Anything you've got that you are really happy with?

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Erm... the ones that fit your feet. Seriously, go out and try on a bunch of pairs. Some of the obvious contenders have already been mentioned here. I have a pair of the

 

"and should last forever" No lightweight boot is going to last forever. You just traded durability for weight.

 

I have a pair of the non-GTX Garmonts (never been much of a believer in GTX boots) and they're pretty nice. Not waterproof but fine for summer and lightweight crampons. The toe is pretty narrow though.

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Why not GTX. I've never been that convinced by its durability in a boot. Typical GTX boots tend to be made of synthetic materials with the GTX membrane sandwiched inside it. I've always figured that the membrane is going to get mangled pretty quickly and then you're left with a boot that's not leather and hard to waterproof.

 

But then my personal preference these days seems to be approach shoes or those boots, lightweight crampons and plastic shopping bags for waterproofing on glaciers when cramponing.

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Go with Garmont boots. They fit a medium to low volume foot great. I have a pair of GTX Towers and they climb snow/ice/rock great.

The only down side is you might need to purchase a new crampon if you have step-ins. The boot takes a hybrid, strap toe, style crampon.

 

http://gusa.site.yahoo.net/g1088212.html

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Why not GTX. I've never been that convinced by its durability in a boot.

The GTX Liner on my Towers is at least as durable as the sole.

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The GTX Liner on my Towers is at least as durable as the sole.

 

This may be true but I've never seen any numbers to support it.

 

When I bought my lightweight boots I posted here asking if anyone had any data on how long the GTX membrane in a boot is expected/designed to last.

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I posted here asking if anyone had any data on how long the GTX membrane in a boot is expected/designed to last.

 

I think the best answer you can get is “it’s depends”

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Looks like the Trango S has been discontinued and replaced with the Goretex version. I was hoping to use my REI dividend to pick up a pair...does anyone know if they are planning on carrying these? I hope I don't have to pay full price for these things.

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Only get the waterproof version of the Trango S. I have the non-wp version and they aren't not, in any way, even water-resistant. After about 30 mins in snow they are soaked through. Went on a four day trip with these and hated them, they never dried. I'll never buy non-wp mountaineering boots again. And make sure you get the right size. My were a half size to small and that sucked. I used them for two years getting wet and cramped feet before I retired them. Screw that.

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PS - now I use Kayland Multitractions, they are pretty sweet but not quite as stiff as the trango S, but more comfortable for walking in, and they are waterproof!

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I am leaning toward the Garmont Tower GTX...wondering what the sizing is like on them. Do those of you who are wearing them have them in the same size as your running shoes or whatever?

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I don't own them but from what others said they run narrow

that's been my experience. I wear a 44, I wear a 44 in most other boot brands (or maybe it's a 10/10.5)

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I've never believed in Gore-Tex boots either - especially ones made from synthetics. They're nearly impossible to waterproof, and even if there's GTX in them, they still get soaked with water, weigh 3 pounds more and make your feet cold. The original green Trangos rocked cuz you could coat them with wax. I dig the Garmont Pinnacle for this reason.

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Maybe I can revive this thread..

 

Anybody know which is stiffer between the Kayland Multitraction and the Garmont Towers?

 

And also, taking a step up from these two, anybody have any experience with the Garmont Mountain Lite Karbo GTX or the Kayland K1?

Edited by undermind

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The La Sportiva Trango S rocks my world.
You said it Squidly. thumbs_up.gif Pro Mountain Sports has them on sale for $150, but they don't have all sizes and is limited to stock on hand.

I loved these boots but last year sadly realized that they are far too disposable for even the cheap clearance prices around right now.

 

When I returned them last summer to MEC with the entire kevlar sections on both boots blown right off after three months of weekend use, I was told I had reached the lifetime of the boot (the edges on the soles weren't even rounded yet), and that it was common knowledge that synthetic materials don't last tongue.gifrolleyes.gif

 

Forget that noise, the scarpa freney pro is a bit heavier but is FAR more durable. I will never buy that synthetic kevlar shit again thumbs_down.gif

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I'm not sure it's kevlar per se, more the weight of the boot overall. I had a pair of Tecnica Altis, which have a 100% kevlar fabric upper, that have given me good service. They've done five years of alpine climbing in the Cascades and ice climbing in winter and aren't done yet.

 

If you buy one of these lightweight boots don't expect it to last like a heavier more durable one.

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I currently use the Montrail Torre GTX.

They have done the job so far. Not stiff enough for sustained fron pointing. They are just hiking boots, but the edges are good and they are waterproof and comfortable. You can hike the PCT trail in them or go up Mt. Baker or summer scrambles.

Look like this.

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I tried on and really liked the fit of the Multitraction. But that is my foot. They aren't the lightest, but I would definitely consider those.

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