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Kiwi

What do I do with empty MSR isobutane canisters?

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Well? I can't fathom just throwing them in the trash... eek4.gif

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Puncture the can, crush it, and throw it in the trash.

 

The puntured cans stink so maybe bag 'em first and throw them somewhere outside.

 

-fear

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Depending on where you live, the local recycling company will possibly accept them, provided they've been punctured. I don't think refilling them is likely to be an option because the integrity of the canister can't be guaranteed once it's been used. But there's no reason they can't melt it down and make something else out of it.

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I don't think refilling them is likely to be an option because the integrity of the canister can't be guaranteed once it's been used.

 

Why not?

 

Larger propane tanks are commonly reused.

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If you are so worried about it then why not just get a regular stove like the Dragonfly? the fuel bottles are reusable there, ya know? Is pumping really that tough for you?

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If you are so worried about it then why not just get a regular stove like the Dragonfly? the fuel bottles are reusable there, ya know? Is pumping really that tough for you?

I'm a newbie. (Hence the thread in this forum) I'd be asking the exact same question if I bought a Dragonfly.

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Hmmm... I'm not sure I get your response but MSR sells stoves that take the pressurized canisters that you chuck when the fuel runs out(what you have,obviously) and then they make stoves ,like the dragonfly, that take fuel bottles that you can fill/refill yourself and pressurize yourself by pumping them up... Not as easy to use but still pretty simple and without the constant waste of the canister when the fuel runs out. Check them out at REI or something.

Does that help? wave.gif

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I have both. When going light is really important, I take the pocket rocket that uses cannisters. When weight isn't that big a factor, I take my white gas MSR XGK and pump it up.

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If you are so worried about it then why not just get a regular stove like the Dragonfly? the fuel bottles are reusable there, ya know? Is pumping really that tough for you?

Griz,

 

I'm sure you're a hardperson, so weight is no issue for you. But have you considered that maybe Kiwi wants a lightweight stove? The MSR Pocket Rocket weighs 3 oz, and the Dragonfly weighs 14 oz. For a short trip, the fuel weight benefits of white gas over isobutane do not nearly compensate for the 11-oz difference in stove weight. (Yes, I know there's a difference in performance under cold & windy conditions, blah blah blah).

 

 

Cheers,

Steve Ramsey

Edited by Stephen_Ramsey

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Check out the MSR simmerlite, Kiwi, it's a whitegas stove (no canisters to trash every other trip), weighs in at 6.5 oz.

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Check out the MSR simmerlite, Kiwi, it's a whitegas stove (no canisters to trash every other trip), weighs in at 6.5 oz.

 

Bullshit.

 

The stove alone may weigh 6.3 oz. but you have to have the pump for the bottle which is another 2.2 oz, for 8.5 oz. This doesn't include the windscreen, fuel bottle, or the bag.

 

I have a simmerlite. I also have a postal scale. And a low tolerance for marketing hype.

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don't go all postal, tomtom cantfocus.gif its (one of) the lightest white gas stoves. I guess the trangias or home made alcohol stoves would also be an alternative to buying canisters all the time and throwing them away.

 

Kiwi, if its an enviromental reason you don't want to throw them out, go with an alcohol stove(no dinosaurs killed for dinner) or a white gas. The simmerlite is the lightest WG stove i know of out there.

 

lightest way to go, leave the stove at home when you don't have to melt water for drinking, and eat uncooked stuff like ramen, HC, and cold instant coffee. mmm, tasty. tongue.gif

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Word is there are refillable isobutane stoves in Japan. They're not sold here, however. Maybe MSR should think about it. Seems like most people who enjoy the outdoors and would use a lightweight stove also have an environmental conscience.

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Most small canisters do not have a flush valve which makes the dangerous to refill, ask the King of the Hill.

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Word is there are refillable isobutane stoves in Japan. They're not sold here, however. Maybe MSR should think about it. Seems like most people who enjoy the outdoors and would use a lightweight stove also have an environmental conscience.

 

As far as this refilling stuff goes I think the biggest problem is where the hell you going to find an iso-butane-propane refiller? I buy bottled gas for welding at a place that has just about every bizarre gas combo you can think of and I've never seen it..... EMS/REI sure aren't going to get into the business of refilling explosive gas containers. There's just no market....

 

-Fear

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In most of the Portland shops you can return Snow-Peak canisters, since they are a local company they'll pick up empties from the stores they deliver to.

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MSR is a Seattle company, so they should be able to pick them up from local retailers.

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you can return MSR to a local shop.. even in Portland. they dont care what label is on it.. they'll recycle it anyway.

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crushing them on your forehead like a beer can would be a good party trick

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