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cgass177

New to Climbing; Best Ways to Start?

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agreed on just teaching yourself thing, at least for volcano mountaineering - my buddies and i all didn't know shit, were stupid-young enthusiastic, bought the book, went out and practiced it, then made it all happen, includign going to denali w/ complete confidence that we could get ourselves out of any glacial disaster of reasonable proportions or die in good style :)

 

the more technical and crazy involved, the better it is to have competent training - volcano stuff, unlike rock/bigwall/alpine climbing, is pretty tame, no?

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volcano stuff, unlike rock/bigwall/alpine climbing, is pretty tame, no?
Well, fuq'n up on a volcano can getcha kilt just as dead... :)

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volcano stuff, unlike rock/bigwall/alpine climbing, is pretty tame, no?
Well, fuq'n up on a volcano can getcha kilt just as dead... :)

sure, but playing w/ a butter knife is different than juggling w/ a kitana :)

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volcano stuff, unlike rock/bigwall/alpine climbing, is pretty tame, no?
Well, fuq'n up on a volcano can getcha kilt just as dead... :)
sure, but playing w/ a butter knife is different than juggling w/ a kitana :)
Or chainsaws... :)

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I've done a fair share of rock climbing, but in my home state of New York

-Chris

Chris, I'm a native finger lakes kid m'self. Where'bouts you from?

 

I'm from Irondequoit, a subburb of Rochester.

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I dunno if id ever tell someone who I dont know to just go out and try it even on a volcano because there are some seriously massive fuckups out there who will fuck it up and be dead. Not to mention there is some nasty shit that happens on the volcanoes.

 

The volcanoes are great but there are only a few of them. If you only learn to climb those places youre just going to be disappointed because youre selling yourself very short on what the Cascades have to offer. Suck it up and go through some courses and start going to a climbing gym. The more you challenge yourself learning the happier youll be in the long run.

 

P.S. My wifes from Webster

Edited by Into The Void

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I don't think volcano vs. non-volcano is where I'd draw the danger line. I also don't think it is even a question of "technical" vs. "nontechnical." A couple of very experienced friends of mine died on "nontechnical" terrain recently and I have known experienced climbers to die on volcano's.

 

For a new climber I'd recommend reading such things as "Accidents in North American Mountaineering," textbooks like

"Freedom of the Hills," and taking any and all classes or other instruction available.

 

I'd still say "go out there and have fun," but I'd offer the caution: "be careful; people die."

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I grew up in Alaska and started doing more and more serious "hikes" with no knowledge until I had some very close calls that scared the hell out of me.

 

Next step was read (aka STUDY) Freedom of the Hills, Snow Sense and Wilderness First Aid, get as much formal training as possible (avy and rescue stuff is hard to learn yourself) and then if you really want to climb hard struggle through the learning curve asap and get a solid experienced partner.

 

Be careful but don't be too scared to go out on a limb, its the only way to really get better!

Edited by jg_eddie

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I just started reading/learning as much as I could, and started going up. I had to drag non-climber friends along for courage at first (which will generally get you about halfway there). The best place to meet people to climb with is on summits... talk to everyone, shake hands, swap business cards/facebook names, and start networking. Be aggressive about staying in touch and inviting people on climbs. Once you have other guys to go with, the rest falls into place- shared gear, shared knowledge, shared experience will all take you to better and better places.

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Galcier skills are best learned in a course or workshop, though you can practice some items straight out of FOH with a few friends.

 

Another way to gain experience is by going on non-technical outings and gradually head into steeper and more rugged terrain. You don't have to be on Mt Rainier to practice self-arresting. Buy the Scrambles book and go when conditions allow. Start logging some miles. Hook up with like-minded partners. The Mounties are made for people like you, but there are other ways to go too. It all depends on your personal style. The bushwhackers are good peeps BTW.

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