Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
mts4602

Trad Climbing - Getting Down

Recommended Posts

If you are climbing an alpine route or a route that doesn't have permanent anchors and you have to rappel down, do you always have to leave a sling or some other piece of gear behind? It seems like there has to be some other way. I can't see climbers leaving slings everywhere every time they climb a route.

 

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you are climbing an alpine route or a route that doesn't have permanent anchors and you have to rappel down, do you always have to leave a sling or some other piece of gear behind? It seems like there has to be some other way. I can't see climbers leaving slings everywhere every time they climb a route.

 

Matt

 

The other choice is magic....so yes go buy some rap tat and buy the dark stuff so its not visible from space...save the red slings for other stuff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

many alpine routes only need a couple raps to get where you walk off. Also, double ropes are a good idea for alpine as fewer raps are needed.

 

oh yeah, one "trick" is to use a tree without a sling but this wears the bark off the trunk when you pull the rope. So this is not a very environmentally conscious activity as should be saved for the most dire situations.

Edited by genepires

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get some quicklinks or real rap rings and stick them on your harness so that you avoid the pesky problem of stuck ropes. Not to mention that pulling rope through webbing will destroy the webbing. . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can't see climbers leaving slings everywhere every time they climb a route.

You're new to climbing, right? Go do the South Face of the Tooth, not only is every tree wrapped with a mile of brightly colored webbing, gear is stuck on nearly every pitch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oh yeah, one "trick" is to use a tree without a sling but this wears the bark off the trunk when you pull the rope. So this is not a very environmentally conscious activity as should be saved for the most dire situations.

 

Not to mention you don't want to get sap all over your rope. So, it's a lose-lose. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can't see climbers leaving slings everywhere every time they climb a route.

You're new to climbing, right? Go do the South Face of the Tooth, not only is every tree wrapped with a mile of brightly colored webbing, gear is stuck on nearly every pitch.

 

Never climbed trad. I live in KY and climb in the Red River Gorge. There are permanent anchors on all of the sport routes so I've never had to deal with the issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

technically, not the fastest way down. The fastest way down is not advised.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You got some mighty fine "trad" lines inn the gorge there. Although, not alpine... Eastern sky bridge ridge is my favorite. The "inhibator". ahhhhh....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't have to carry enough gear to replace the entire rappel route - on the most popular routes around here, there's been enough traffic that you're maintaining already existing rap anchors by REMOVING old, ugly, untrustworthy tat and replacing it with a bit of your own, newer, trustworthy stuff. That's what makes 6 mm and 7mm cordelettes so perfect: they're cheap to replace, you'll always have one or two for anchors on the way up, they're cheap to replace, you can cut them into smaller pieces for rappel anchors on the descent, and they're cheap to replace!

Having a couple of quicklinks or "leaver-biners" is wise as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×