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AsthmaticClimber

St. Helens True Summit Elevation Gain ?

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So I've climbed to the crater rim 4 times, but yesterday I made my way over to the true summit. Lots of down and up along the rim.

 

Climber's Bivy is at 3,740' and the summit is 8,365'. Going straight to the top is a total of 4,625'.

 

So my question is; with the ups and downs on the 0.25 mile traverse to the true summit, does anyone have an idea of what the actual elevation gain is? I'm thinking it would add 100 to 200 feet...not sure.

 

Any ideas?

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Does it really matter? Almost all hikes or climbs include a few hundred feet of "unaccounted" elevation gain.

Edited by RaisedByPikas

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Since I'm asking, yes it matters, to me. If it didn't matter (to me) I wouldn't have asked. If you don't know the answer then don't post.
So someone registers, makes their very first post, and comes off as a smart-ass on Day One.

Nice going, AC - you'll fit in here just fine. :)

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Since I'm asking, yes it matters, to me. If it didn't matter (to me) I wouldn't have asked. If you don't know the answer then don't post.

 

Since you don't know the answer, how will you be able to know if any purported answer anyone posts here is correct or not?

 

Speaking of which, the actual extra elevation gain is exactly 420.

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i actually have taken a gps and watched the amount of gain/loss on the traverse and it has amounted to 80 feet

 

however, my gps shows climbers bivouac parking lot @ 3,820 ft, making the total elevation gained exactly the same... in addition to that, there is a margin of error +- 50 feet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

note: none of the above actually happened

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Or 4:20 if you prefer.

:grlaf:

 

Dude this one time I climbed St Helens and like the top was way up there. Fortunately I made it down :toad:

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You guys crack me up. Smart ass? I ask a question and then I get a smart ass answer. Really?

 

Thank you for the people that did provide an answer.

 

If you must know, I'm keeping track of how my asthma does based on my elevation gain.

 

I'm not trying to be a smart ass, I just don't get why people respond if they don't have anything close to an answer.

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AC,

How does this:

Does it really matter? Almost all hikes or climbs include a few hundred feet of "unaccounted" elevation gain.
qualify as a smart-assed answer?

It is a statement of fact, albeit preceded by an interrogatory, which in my mind came off as non-threatening.

 

Following it up with this as your second-ever post:

If you don't know the answer then don't post.
certainly comes off as a tad snarky for a board n00b, IMHO. You're setting the stage for yourself to be considered a douchebag, and we have plenty of those here already, thankyouverymuch.

 

In answer to your last question, bazillions of people on this board make a habit of replying to posts that they don't know (or care) shit about. It's a way of life here. I respectfully suggest that you get used to it if you plan on spending much time here.

 

Oh, and welcome to CC.com! :wave:

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You guys crack me up. Smart ass? I ask a question and then I get a smart ass answer. Really?

 

Thank you for the people that did provide an answer.

 

If you must know, I'm keeping track of how my asthma does based on my elevation gain.

 

I'm not trying to be a smart ass, I just don't get why people respond if they don't have anything close to an answer.

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Thanks Sheep for your answer.

 

So, sorry if I offended anyone, I see how agitated people can get, but I was asking a question specifically about environment, nothing personal or anything I would consider one needing to know my psyche profile and why one would ask a question like I did.

 

Next time I'll put my entire reasoning (mental/physical/personal) for the question up front as to not offend anyone with my retort.

 

Respectfully -n00b

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:lmao: oh my. AC, I would take this thread's answer as: No, no one knows the answer to your question. I think you need to make another trip up there to determine the answer. Be sure to share your findings! If it turns out to be 420 feet, then I won't ban Dru.

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AC, welcome.

A word of perspective: cc.com is like the rest of the interweb. There are many treasures to find, but they are often hidden in mountains of trash. Happy hunting.

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i actually have taken a gps and watched the amount of gain/loss on the traverse and it has amounted to 80 feet

 

however, my gps shows climbers bivouac parking lot @ 3,820 ft, making the total elevation gained exactly the same... in addition to that, there is a margin of error +- 50 feet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

note: none of the above actually happened

I have no idea what you just said,

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This type of thing is actually a mathematically interesting question first proposed by the great Benoît B. Mandelbrot who died last week:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/How_Long_Is_the_Coast_of_Britain%3F_Statistical_Self-Similarity_and_Fractional_Dimension

 

Assuming you are happy with an approximate that ignores those factors, if you have a geeky side, you can get reasonably high resolution topographic data from several places on the web and should be able to write something to interpolate along your path along the rim.

 

Buying a good altimeter and climbing it again might be easier though.

 

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