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jpb19752001

Top Rope Getup

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Hello. Aspiring rock climber, looking to get out to some of the local crags for some top rope practice. Does anyone have any recomendations on what to carry for setting up top rope anchors? Not placing bolts, but for tying into existing hardware, trees, etc. I guess it depends on where I go, but is there a core set of gear that I could take along to be prepared for anything? Thanks. smile.gif" border="0

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hey ya your rght it does depend on where you go.I think a good TR gear package would consist of: 4 locking biners 4 sewn slings ( medium size) 2 3m lengths of 1"-1.5" webbingThe latter is for fat trees.that should probably take care of most anchors you encounter.

cheers jesse

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Jesse's package will do for most locations. Some locations may require up to 30 feet of additional rope or webbing, for trees or other anchors that are well back from the edge. However, if you set something up with a long sling or rope from the anchor to the locking biners serving as a pulley, be aware that in some situations the whole rig can sweep back and forth and send rocks on your head.

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1 experienced climberhis or her rack and equipment

a belay device for you

best way i know of getting a rope up on something hard you want to try. smile.gif" border="0

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I really wouldn't recommend trying to figure out how to set up a TR, even on bolts/other fixed placements, without having someone who knows how to do it there to talk you through the process, and to inspect your work. I imagine the books you are looking at make it look pretty commonsensical, and a lot of it is, but if you screw this up, you could easily kill yourself. Don't you know any acual climbers you can get to come out with you? Can you bribe them? smile.gif" border="0

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my question is whats the deal with so many lockers??? i think that i only carry two at all times...one for my belay device and one for the anchor all other biners would work fine....

i say this for a couple reasons

1. the chance of your locker failing is minimum to none. so just back it up with a reg biner

2. lockers are more expensive then regular biners

3. two opposed gate biners would work well for a top rope as well

i think all this triple reduncy is a bit much and can confuse some beginners.....

keep it simple.

other thing that i think you should consider for tr practice it too prctice always checking yours and your friends knot before going up!!!!!!!! making sure that each others harness is doubler backed.....these are two of the most important skillz wether lead climbing or top roping.....

last thing i will spout off is that some locking biners work better then other for this application. petzel pear shaped works well!!

have fun!!!

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I recommend you buy a set of Smiley's Wedgies Nuts-- they have been on sale at REI-Outlet for a long time. Nuts are by far the most important piece of protection you will use. There are several Black Diamond Hexes on sale there as well. These are also very useful. It takes skill and intelligence to set up a belay with natural protection, but it is an essential skill and will start you on your way to a leading rack.

I agree with Erik that when starting a rack it is preferable to have MORE biners (cheap D's or Ovals) than a few NICE biners (expensive locking or wire gate). Go for volume-- get as many as you can. Bare essentials I'd say 5-10 biners plus two lockers.

Buy a cordalette: 20 - 40 feet of 6-7mm cord, tied in a loop ( with a double fisherman's knot). This is very useful for building anchors.

Do you have a rope? You will abuse your first rope so get something thick (10-11 mm).

With respect to the recent accident report, I have to recommend you buy a helmet. This protects you from falling loose rock as well as the inadvertent knock on you mellon.

When I was 17 I taught myself how to climb. I read books and then tried it out in the field. I constantly harrassed other climbers bugging them to check my anchors, etc. to confirm the safety of my system. My friends and I bribed experienced climbers with libations to get them to teach us what they knew, but there is nothing compared to going out and figuring shit out on your own.

Climbing is dangerous. If you are stupid or have poor common sense then don't try to teach yourself. If however, you have a good mellon then by all means learn in small steps, constantly check your knots, harness, gear, and have fun.

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don't team up with erik, he's sketchy... tongue.gif" border="0

You can use lots of different stuff to set up top ropes. Get John Longs book "Anchors," he lays out several different scenarios depending on the anchor types available. One thing I'll mention:

Do not TR straight through the links on chain anchors. This just puts needless wear on them, causing them to become thin and sketchy, needing replacement(just like erik). Use your own gear instead. Have fun, be safe. Note the recent accident report, this kinda shit happens.

Oh yeah, be carefull(ie. don't do it) about setting up TR's where loose rock might be knocked down on people below. This includes lots of crags near North Bend and Vantage. Better to just politely ask other climbers to lead up and set up the TR for you. Many folks would be more than happy to do this.

[ 02-25-2002: Message edited by: Lambone ]

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quote:

Originally posted by Lambone:
don't team up with erik, he's sketchy...
tongue.gif" border="0

[ 02-25-2002: Message edited by: Lambone ]

well i will admit that i do not live up to gym standards, but then again bone, he is asking about real rock....ever climbed some?? it's fun!!!!

[big Drink]

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Did you say the gym was the ONLY place to learn to climb and (Mountaineer?) safely? I guess nobody prior to vertical world climbed safely!

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quote:

Originally posted by Lambone:
The gym is the only place to learn anything about how to rock climb and mountaineer safely.

Yeah so much plastic in the mountains. rolleyes.gif" border="0

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Good thing Beckey had them gyms to learn in back in the 40's. God knows how unsafe he would have been otherwise. rolleyes.gif" border="0

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Hey, don't be so discouraging. JPB just wants to go out and have fun, and with a small amount of common sense he (or she) can probably go out and do so. As a pup, I went out and set up top ropes with friends of mine who also knew nothing about climbing and I was only dropped once.

JPB - read some books on climbing anchors and go climbing with someone who knows what they are doing if you can, but if you can set a top-rope anchor on a big tree, and if the rock you are climbing upon is not some pile of loose breakable crumbly junk (better yet if it is climbed often), and if there aren't loose rocks sitting around the cliff top or dangerous terrain at the bottom, you will probably live. Just be sure you have somebody show you and your buddies how to belay.

[ 02-25-2002: Message edited by: mattp ]

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how about this cause everyone thinks that old timers won't help the new fish....i'll take you out and show you the ropes if you want just email me and we can set something up!!!

then again i am not an old dog, but have tried climbing for sometime......and i still think it is fun!!!

erik

(the tr puns were not intended in above post)

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quote:

Originally posted by Lambone:
The gym is the only place to learn anything about how to rock climb and mountaineer safely.

Nice troll!

right up there with your comment on "The Freedom of the Hills" being full of garbage Lambone.

I say the gym is the only place to learn how waste your life away; safely of course. Stay away from the gyms and go to the mountains.

jpb19752001 - the first reply sounds apropriate in addition to a rope, harness and belay device.Try to go with erik, use your head and you will be fine. smile.gif" border="0

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Thanks, I was hoping to get someones attention with that.

However, I'd argue that climbing in the gym is much less a waste of precious life than sprayin on the computer.

And one other thing...I been climbin since I was a freshman in high school, and I've seen more people get hurt in the gym in the last two years than I have seen in all that time. Falling broken holds, bad belayers, poor spotting techniques, rope failure (not the gyms rope), pulled tendons and burnt lips from hot coffee. the only time I've been injured climbing was when I got dropped in the gym. Gym climbing is not much safer than climbing outside.

[ 02-26-2002: Message edited by: Lambone ]

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quote:

Originally posted by Lambone:
And one other thing...I been climbin since I was a freshman in high school, and I've seen more people get hurt in the gym in the last two years than I have seen in all that time. [...] Gym climbing is not much safer than climbing outside.

Lambone,

I have a questionnaire for you:

1. Are you stating above that it is dangerous to go climbing in a climbing gym?

2. Are you implying that, in specific, the Vertical World in Seattle is a dangerous place to climb?

Chuck

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Yes, infact it's posted on a big sign right when you walk in the front door. This sign is a standard CGA "Climbing is Dangerous" warning, and posted in gyms throught the country.

Either way you look at it, thirty feet off the ground is the same whether outdoors or indoors. Climbing is inherently dangerous no matter where its done.

Our equipment isn't dangerous, accidents occur through user error. As in people involved with accidents don't tie in right, belay properly, or know how to spot correctly.

Any other questions on your list?

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I'm curious about your report of "rope failure". I understand it was not the gym's rope. Did someone snap a rope on a lead fall at VW? If so, any more details? If not, what happened?

[ 02-26-2002: Message edited by: chucK ]

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