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ZimZam

Missing on Hood

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Keeping a GPS warm and functional in that same 70mph gust can be a challenge. You have to keep it warm from the start and that involves zippers and strings and stuff.

I always put my map in a large ziplock folded open to the pertinent area and tuck it, (don't worry Sherri, I have to eat and there is no room left), in a large pocket.

I also keep my GPS and compass on different strings around my neck so I can get a bearing off the GPS, put it inside my coat, and follow the bearing by compass. I also used to have a Suunto watch/altimeter but it got wet.

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Back to the original topic:

Way to go Pitts and Co. for a happy outcome.

Oh yeah word to that. The fact that they walked off the mountain proves that they did not need a GPS to have a good and relatively safe time. Sorry if I was trying to sound pedantic.

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When navigating during aventure races I use a transparent map pouch on an elastic lanyard, preferably one that folds up enough to be stuffed in a pocket or waist belt pouch. Similarly, I keep my compass around my neck on an elastic lanyard.

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Back to the original topic:

 

Way to go Pitts and Co. for a happy outcome.

 

And feel free to post a TR on the spanking.

 

Yes. Please do post a TR in the Oregon Cascades Forum.

Your style of writing seems honest and fun.

Don't be intimidated by the infighting amoungst the natives. They only attack each other unless directly provoked.

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Lanyards are another very old and very useful invention.

don't worry, lover, I agree a compass is way more reliable, broadly useful, etc etc. I hereby affirm your worth and usefulness in this important discussion. I still don't own a GPS either. But the "ol' map blowing away trick" is a little unsettling. Ever tried to read one in 70mph gusts? I hope I never have to, but what if? Do tell me your deep thoughts, O great guru of the tried and true. I sit at your feet, humbly awaiting your condescension! Maybe you have them screenprinted on your shirt sleeves?

 

but seriously, what are some ideas for keeping a wind-sail of a map from blowing away? I'm sure some SAR folks have tips here, which would be useful to the two Hood folks, and to me as well.

 

one of my own tricks only works with my Gregory pack. my pack lid is clear plastic facing the inside of the pack, so a map placed in the lid compartment, facing the inside of the pack, can be read by opening the lid without ever removing the contents.

 

I fold my map (7.5 min quad) with the most critical parts of the route visible in one section that I can see all together. I then put the map in a ziploc.

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When navigating during aventure races I use a transparent map pouch on an elastic lanyard, preferably one that folds up enough to be stuffed in a pocket or waist belt pouch. Similarly, I keep my compass around my neck on an elastic lanyard.

 

I asked for condescension :confused:

 

Yes Pitts, please don't be intimidated, I'm not even a native! I'm just immigrant scum, here to take the jobs of hardworking Native Americans.

The "nastiness" is usually a joke, and it's always carefully directed away from those who aren't asking for it by name.

Welcome, I look forward to hearing more from you in the future!

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Hi. Just wanted to add that the map blowing away in the wind part was yet another fabrication by the media. We had our map the whole time, it just wasn't much good up on the glaciers if we couldn't see to get our bearings. It did, however, eventually disintegrate under the snow and ice it was constantly exposed to.

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The zip lock bag is a good one. I use a water proof clear plastic mag bag I picked up at REI, you can fit a whole quad with out folding it. They work great and more durable than the zip lock bag. Tired to find it on the REI web site but no luck.

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As a pro patroller at T-line, I find it unlikely that ski patrol had much to do with anything except finding your car in the parking lot. Glad you're alright.

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Mr Pitts, while I think it is great you survived this ordeal and I applaud your ability to walk out on your own, I find it amazing that the weather sites you got your information from did not mention high winds and possible rain and snow at 8,000 feet by noon on Monday. I know everyone is going to think I'm an ass, but I can't beleive I am the only one who recogized weather over the top of the mountain at 6am showing signs of the approaching storm to come. When you see the "hood" or the "jet stream" back off and try another day. Also, don't forget to check the avalanche conditions with the NWAC their weather and forcasts are damn good and might just save your life some day, that is if you carry the proper gear. Did you guys have any avalanche gear like a beacon, shovel, probe, knowledge?

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So, about 1/2 an hour later of slogging through snow we came accross a nalgene hanging from a tree with flagging around it and turns out it was a geocache. Right after we opened it up, the sheriff called me and we were able to give him exact coordinates. When I gave him our location, I asked him to look at a map and just give us a bearing and we could hump it out.

 

When I read this, my first thought was, "Hmm, they had a map, a compass, and just stumbled onto a geocache with a perfect UTM location. This should give them their exact map position, and from there they could have walked the short distance to safety."

 

More pondering. "Hmm, they did not do this because they walked off the boundaries of their map, or it was lost/destroyed."

 

So, thanks for the clarification about the map part. It's a good reminder for us all to 1) protect our maps with a baggie, plastic sleeve, etc, and consider bringing maps at 2 different scales of your climb. One large scale for the main route ,and one at a smaller scale for the "whoops we got off route and are now in new terrain."

 

BTW, Good thinking to know you had found a geocache. That was using yer noodle.

 

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Hello Traditional Mountain Climbers-

There is a discussion of the Basic Responsibilities of climbers and others, framed in a discussion of the:

"Oregon SAR Statutes and Traditional Responsibities".

 

This new thread was started during the first week in February in 2008.

--trad_guy

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>>>>i have seen someting happen to a cc.comer who had shit to say about others mistakes unfortunate events... seems to me he was stuck up on some mountain for 2 days waiting out a storm and ended up with a heli ride off. fortunatly in this case, and the one i am speaking of...everyone got down alive and in good shape.

 

I think more than a few of us have fantasized about being in Lammy's position, stuck in a tent with 2 climber chicks, providing the necessary support to each other to make it thru a sticky situation, etc. But reality is always differnet than fantasy.

 

In any case, I'm glad this turned out well for everyone involved.

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