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Maine-iac

mountaineering boots/packs

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Hey all, i am trying to find a great pair of mountaineering boots, and i am just wondering what people recomend, this type of website is much better than rei.com or backcountry for info. Also i am in the market for an alpine backpack. What do people recomend??

 

-Thanks

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I have and like the Scarpa Charmoz GTX boot. Lots of others like the La Sportiva Trango's various models. These I would think are only 3 season boots so you would have to further define your season needs and type of routes. I would use my Charmoz's for 3 season scrambling. see http://www.mec.ca

 

 

Although the fit would have to be the first priority I like the Deuter 32-42 litre packs with mesh back, built in rain cover, ice axe loop, dual trek pole loops.

 

Have fun shopping

Allan

http://www.geocities.com/truedino/scramble.htm

Scrambles in the Cdn Rockies, Colorado, and Christian Apologetics

Edited by mtnview

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I recently got the sportiva Glacier RSS and am very pleased with these hybrid-crampon compatible boots.

 

I bought and returned several packs and found the REI 40L was the most comfortable with a moderately heavy load. it isnt the lightest pack or the most breatheable back, but it has gear loops, straps for tools and I just generally found it to fit well.

 

I had the deuter 40L for a week and liked it but the weird hip pads lined up with my kidneys rather than my hips; that pack got everything right except the torso length(they only offer it in one size) if you try it, load it up with what would be your max load and wear it for a few hrs.

 

I personally was very disappointed with the new osprey packs. They did away with the lumbar pad completely on the new packs, opting instead to just extend the mesh back all the way down. I dont think they will carry a moderate to heavy load very well at all. Can anyone prove me wrong on this conjecture?

Edited by 111

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So, it depends on what type of climbing you're going to do. If you're going to be doing lots of rock climbing in you boots, mixed with snow and ice, you'll want a pair of stiff leathers, like the La Sportiva Nepal's, or a lighter pair like the Trango's. If you're doing lots of glacier slogging or steep ice, you'll want a good pair of plastics, like the Scarpa Omega or the Koflach Arctic's. As for a pack, the Arc'teryx Bora's are pretty good, but my favorite is the North Face Prophet 65, the older one. It's the perfect alpine pack. Gregory makes some good ones too.

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With the limited info, I would say:

 

Pack - choose one about 55 - 60 liters, that will get you through most. Check out BD, Cilogear, ...

 

Boots - for an all around boot, I would look at an insulated leather (e.g., La Sportiva Lhotse). Of course if you are serious you will want multiple boots and the insulated leather will work its way to the bottom of the heap. If you could have 2 boots, I would recommend 1 plastic (e.g., Scarpa Omega) and 1 lightweight leather (e.g., La Sportiva Trango Extreme or Trango S). There are lots of other similar options, and it will depend on your foot and availability. Check out La Sportiva, Scarpa, Mad Rock, Garmont, Kayland

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I am a use a TNF Spire 38 for single day climbing or multiday non climbing trips and seems to work fine for me. I also use a Dakine Heli pro pack for summer and times when I carry my splitboard when you just can't skin anymore...

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http://mchalepacks.com/

 

You've got Dan Mchale, one of the world's best resources for quality packs, right there in Seattle. It's worth the wait for a fitting. If you convince him you're serious about buying a pack he might consider letting you use a 'loaner' for a little bit so you can decide which features you like and dislike.

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Black Diamond Revelation is a very practical technical pack for climbing. It is available in 35L an 45L.

 

I use some Wild Things packs because they are damn tough but they may not fit some as well as others.

 

+1 for the Bora series as well. They seem to be the most capable (load wise) pack out there. This is just my experience though.

 

 

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http://mchalepacks.com/

 

You've got Dan Mchale, one of the world's best resources for quality packs, right there in Seattle. It's worth the wait for a fitting. If you convince him you're serious about buying a pack he might consider letting you use a 'loaner' for a little bit so you can decide which features you like and dislike.

 

Don't forget the details here! You also gotta have a few $$$$ for the McHale. I think it starts at $500, and goes up from there.

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You know, reading through this thread, it reminds me: There is not a single pack or boot combination that is univerasl for everyone.

 

This is the crux of this spot. You have to set a defined set of rules when shopping for gear. Look at what you want to do. There is no "one size fits all" piece when it comes to boots and packs.

 

Hell, I use four different packs, three different boots, two different snowboard boots, three boards, and on and on.... (don't even start thinking about sleeping bags or ropes...)

 

having friends with the same problem helps.

 

 

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I'm in a similar situation, where I'm shopping for a pack and boots. My question is more about WHERE to touch and feel these things...

 

Where in the Seattle area is a place I can try on a pair of Millet Onesport, Olympus Mons, or Koflach Arcis, or Trango's? Don't even mention REI...they rarely have these type of boots in stock.

 

I've tried on lots of packs so that's not a problem for me.

 

I have also resigned to the fact that I will need multiple boots. :)

Edited by dreimer

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http://mchalepacks.com/

 

You've got Dan Mchale, one of the world's best resources for quality packs, right there in Seattle. It's worth the wait for a fitting. If you convince him you're serious about buying a pack he might consider letting you use a 'loaner' for a little bit so you can decide which features you like and dislike.

 

Don't forget the details here! You also gotta have a few $$$$ for the McHale. I think it starts at $500, and goes up from there.

 

I don't have the $$$ for a McHale but I have heard that a McHale pack is the final word in packs. Again, if you have the $$$$ for it.

 

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check out feathered friends in seattle. they always seem to have the climbing gear I can't find anywhere else. a bunch of the companies, ie OR, Patagonia, Marmot, have stores in seattle area, and sometimes you can find stuff there. otherwise, try second ascents in ballard. it's kinda hit or miss for them, and it's all used stuff, but you can usually find some gear in pretty good condition. hope that helps.

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Since we're talking about boots, I have a question too: Everybody seems to say plastics are the thing if I want to do stuff like rainier, and something like the trangos is better for stuff in the cascades. The trango bit I understand, but plastics sound like they'd be...well, plastic, inflexible, clunky, etc. If I'm gonna be walking up a glacier, don't I want my boots to flex a bit? Any leather boots that are good for stuff like rainier, hood, etc? Something like La Sportiva's Nuptse or something? I apologize if the answer is actually obvious, I am a newbie about mountaineering.

 

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Plastics suck ass. They come into their own only when it's really cold. You can get a very cheap used pair of plastics for the rare times when you'll use them, but unless you're going to be out in really cold temperatures (10 F or below for extended periods for me), don't bother getting a pair of frankenboots.

 

If you're going for only one pair of boots, the Trangos, Garmont Charmoz, or similar type of light mountaineering boot will be the most versatile for high season cascade climbing. Buy some supergaitors and you can use them on Rainier, even in winter, too. These light weight boots work well on trail, snow, and rock. As always, the most important feature of any boot is how well it fits your foot.

 

If you want a stiffer, more insulated boot to climb more technical ice, and extended winter conditions etc, the Trango Ice Evo, Asolo Cholatse, and competing 3/4 - full shank boots will all leave plastics in the dust on any terrain.

 

Pro Mountain Sports in the U district is a good shop to check out climbing gear selected by experienced alpinists.

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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http://mchalepacks.com/

 

You've got Dan Mchale, one of the world's best resources for quality packs, right there in Seattle. It's worth the wait for a fitting. If you convince him you're serious about buying a pack he might consider letting you use a 'loaner' for a little bit so you can decide which features you like and dislike.

Don't forget the details here! You also gotta have a few $$$$ for the McHale. I think it starts at $500, and goes up from there.

 

I don't have the $$$ for a McHale but I have heard that a McHale pack is the final word in packs. Again, if you have the $$$$ for it.

For $500 I can get a lifetime supply of Golite Jams, put them in a giant tissue dispenser, and just throw them away when they blow out. Or spend 5 minutes repairing minor tears as they happen. Having said that, mine's been durable.

 

Did the McHales ever come down in weight? They used to be pretty heavy. I don't carry my sleeping bag, pad, and bivvy sack around with me on day climbs, so I don't see the point of an extra 3 to 4 lbs of pack weight around unless I'm hauling the solar powered mini-fridge up to base camp.

 

Granite Gear also makes good, light packs. I recently bought a Marmot pack, and it's got MADE IN CHINA BY PRISONERS written all over it. Gregory has also gone the prison labor route, although their pack weight has come way down. Expect immediate seam blowouts, though. Mountain Smith still has that anvil for a logo...and it's still apropos.

 

 

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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Did the McHales ever come down in weight? They used to be pretty heavy.

Ten years ago I had Dan build a pack to my specifications that is relatively light. It is built on the SARC pattern but has no zippers in the body, no Cordura, only light pack cloth, and a relatively narrow, simple hip belt with a single buckle. The pack weighs about 4.5 pounds and carries weight as well as any Dana Designs, ArcTeryx, or Gregory that I have used and climbs better than the Cold Cold World Chaos or Wild Things Andinista. It is also incredibly durable and has shown almost no wear in 10 years.

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In September I climbed Mt. Shuksan. I did not have my own boots, had to rent some (a mistake I will never make again), and was told plastic Koflach Degre boots were the cats ass. What a mistake; after 15 miles round trip in those plastic boots my feet were totaled. I know the entire trip would have been more enjoyable with good boots. I since bought a pair of Asolo mountaineering boots that are around 4 lbs and have hiked 20 miles and they are comfortable right out of the box. Invest in a pair of good boots like the La Sportiva Trango or Asolo.

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At REI I was told the quality of boots has decreased markedly over the last 5 years as a result of outsourcing. Has this been generally observed?

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I have been wearing boots for work, hunting, hiking, and now climbing for more than thirty years, overall. It is my opinion that boot technology has advanced greatly over the years, and if you buy a quality product it should be every bit as good or better than what was available a few years ago. This seems to be the trend with all technical type gear.

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