Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   11/10/22

      Help keep cascadeclimbers.com going!  Please consider donating so we can keep this site going.   We have set expenses right now but no revenue.  We do hope to getting a sponsor to help out, but for now we just need funds to upgrade the site and pay for hosting and licensing. See the "DONATE" tab in the top menu.
Sign in to follow this  
i_like_sun

Workout Splits

Recommended Posts

1. Ride bike too-from work 5X a week (20 min each way).

2. Lift 0-4 X. Hit whatever is next on the list, if I can remember.

3. Run 0-1 X.

4. Kayak, ski, or climb 1-2X.

5. Boulder/Climb 1X per week if there's a facility close enough.

 

Try to get enough to eat, get enough sleep.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how to ecxell at being mediocer

 

My training philosophy can be summarized as follows:

 

aim low and overachieve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been pretty depressed lately because my PT told me not to run or even pool jog til my achilles tendonitis went away. Running is my stress outlet and with midterms here I'm going crazy. i envy everyone who is getting to do cardio right now. Biking feels good again though, and i'm swimming laps today... but nothing is as good as running. i love it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been pretty depressed lately because my PT told me not to run or even pool jog til my achilles tendonitis went away. Running is my stress outlet and with midterms here I'm going crazy. i envy everyone who is getting to do cardio right now. Biking feels good again though, and i'm swimming laps today... but nothing is as good as running . i love it.

 

So true, so true. Hang in there, girl. You'll be back in those running shoes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i envy everyone who is getting to do cardio right now.

 

me too :cry:

 

at this point it is so hard to keep the stupid cast on. a week and 2 days to go and then i might be able to wear shoes. i am thinking it might be a while longer til i can climb

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

How much do you eat?

 

 

I eat a lot, and I am not thin by any stretch of the imagination.

I've seen you in real life and you're right, you don't look thin. You look solid and healthy! :tup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been pretty depressed lately because my PT told me not to run or even pool jog til my achilles tendonitis went away. Running is my stress outlet and with midterms here I'm going crazy. i envy everyone who is getting to do cardio right now. Biking feels good again though, and i'm swimming laps today... but nothing is as good as running. i love it.

 

 

Oh Mythos, I certaily feel the pain! My doc. told me "not to exercise for a month" back in December..... yeah.... whatever.....

 

I've been in [the] pool too! I've found it to be super nice after lifting.. It cools you down and just feels "theraputic".

 

Have a great day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

How much do you eat?

 

 

I eat a lot, and I am not thin by any stretch of the imagination.

I've seen you in real life and you're right, you don't look thin. You look solid and healthy! :tup:

 

 

Arch, you mean people from this site are "real"? I'm not convinced...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes :) Lets write a book ;)

 

for reals, everytime i start training hard and thinking i am going to get something going and i am going roxor... i get injured or violently ill. i am thinking the universe is telling me something. not really sure what. but it's something.

 

the title of our Cult should be

 

"how to ecxell at being mediocer"

 

and our research can start with "the Theory of Good enough"--some lady already wrote that book ;)

 

Ok, so this is my third post in a row.... what the hell...

 

Yeah, I did it AGAIN last week! I was workin' out consitantly every day, feeling stronger and more energetic every few days. Then come Wednesday afternoon, I decide that a super tough Eliptical workout is a fantastic idea (this is after 40 min. of lifting plus 20 minutes of swimming). Yeah not so much. I used to get away with carelessly pushing my body as hard as possible..... but not after what happened a few months ago..

 

Now I've been screwed for like 5 days.... idiot...

 

We could title the our book "How To Stop Fucking Up"

 

:lmao:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I_like_sun, how long is it going to take you to find a different program, what you are doing is not working for you. If you have to use a machine or if you have to work out for more than 10 minutes with one movement do something else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. It is getting better..... slowly.

 

I seem to revert back to the old patterns only when I am stressed and run down to begin with. Its like the brain decides to get up and leave...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes :) Lets write a book ;)

 

for reals, everytime i start training hard and thinking i am going to get something going and i am going roxor... i get injured or violently ill. i am thinking the universe is telling me something. not really sure what. but it's something.

 

the title of our Cult should be

 

"how to ecxell at being mediocer"

 

and our research can start with "the Theory of Good enough"--some lady already wrote that book ;)

 

Ok, so this is my third post in a row.... what the hell...

 

Yeah, I did it AGAIN last week! I was workin' out consitantly every day, feeling stronger and more energetic every few days. Then come Wednesday afternoon, I decide that a super tough Eliptical workout is a fantastic idea (this is after 40 min. of lifting plus 20 minutes of swimming). Yeah not so much. I used to get away with carelessly pushing my body as hard as possible..... but not after what happened a few months ago..

 

Now I've been screwed for like 5 days.... idiot...

 

We could title the our book "How To Stop Fucking Up"

 

:lmao:

 

 

:moondance: we can write it when we figure out how to do it ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I go to cult meetings three to four times a week.

I climb in the gym twice to three times a week.

I usually stack these activities. For example, last night I climbed for about an hour doing moderates as fast as I could, and then did the cult wod in 11:10 as rx'd.

 

I spend another workout slot or two doing sport specific and agility training, one of the tragic flaws in the cult. One of the workout slots goes to pulldown training and one goes to stairmaster training.

 

I hate running. Nonetheless, I do try to get out and run every month or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A thought for those who are on the bench with foot injuries(Muffy, Knottygirl?): a hardcore-runner friend of mine who was derailled by injuries this year found that Bikram yoga went a long ways toward filling that void that was created when she lost her running.

 

Seemed like the workout was intense enough to feel satisfying in that way that running makes one feel, as compared to the way biking or swimming feel like obvious "substitutes" (making one miss that running buzz all the more.)

 

Having not tried the Bikram myself, though, I can only relay her experience with it. She said it also really helped with the healing and detoxing, so turned out to be a win-win for her.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems to me that almost everyone I know that runs ALL THE TIME is dealing with achilles tendentious, iliotibial sydrome, plantar fasciitis, or hip problems. I just don't think that running miles [everyday] is healthy!

 

Personally, I freaking LOVE to run, but I can't do it all the time - I lose muscle mass too fast. I've found that if I do less frequent, but much higher intensity runs I get far more out of it, AND I save my achilles...

 

For cardio, I've read a lot of research that describes high intensity circuit training as one of the best forms (meaning about a 40 minute session of resistance training will full body movement patterns with very little rest). It stimulates more muscle mass and elicits a better endocrine response for lean tissue growth than simple long distance endurance training. It may seem backwards to what a climber would want to train for, afterall we are endurance athletes, but building up a solid base of lean muscle and strength is being proven in studies to enhance actual endurance performance and increase cardiovascular capacity.

 

I know I haven't posted any references, so if anyone is interested I could post a couple study titles on here.

 

There, ramble over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...but building up a solid base of lean muscle and strength is being proven in studies to enhance actual endurance performance and increase cardiovascular capacity.

 

I know I haven't posted any references, so if anyone is interested I could post a couple study titles on here.

 

Yes, I'd be interested in studies that show that building a base of muscle and strength will enhance endurance. Do you have some sources? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It seems to me that almost everyone I know that runs ALL THE TIME is dealing with achilles tendentious, iliotibial sydrome, plantar fasciitis, or hip problems. I just don't think that running miles [everyday] is healthy!

 

Personally, I freaking LOVE to run, but I can't do it all the time - I lose muscle mass too fast. I've found that if I do less frequent, but much higher intensity runs I get far more out of it, AND I save my achilles...

 

For cardio, I've read a lot of research that describes high intensity circuit training as one of the best forms (meaning about a 40 minute session of resistance training will full body movement patterns with very little rest). It stimulates more muscle mass and elicits a better endocrine response for lean tissue growth than simple long distance endurance training. It may seem backwards to what a climber would want to train for, afterall we are endurance athletes, but building up a solid base of lean muscle and strength is being proven in studies to enhance actual endurance performance and increase cardiovascular capacity.

 

I know I haven't posted any references, so if anyone is interested I could post a couple study titles on here.

 

There, ramble over.

 

Looks like these guys LOVE to run, too. Too much. :eek:

 

ldbruncaughlin103099.gif

 

I think you're onto something with your research, I_like. Asking some good questions. :tup:

 

Too much of any one exercise is likely to be counterproductive eventually. Running is a particularly slippery slope--those endorphins are suweeht-- but even yoga has it's share of overachievers who push too hard and pay the price.

 

If you want to play hard, you've got to rest hard. No matter how much "mass" you acquire, a shortened, fatigued muscle is weak. Long is strong.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MMMM, yes. Long, lean, supple, strong and mean! Thats when muscles are their sexiest!

 

I wasn't implying that we all go become stiff meat heads....... Actually, its my personal experience (and there is research here as well) that working on strength and flexibility [at the same time] is one of the best things you can do for a muscle. Basically, by doing too much static stretching you lengthen the muscle, yes, but it actually becomes weaker in the process - its ability to contract forcefully and accurately is reduced. And on the flip side, if you don't work with a full range of motion muscles get too tight and too short - again, they dont' fire properly and they are at risk for tears.

 

I had an experience a few years ago when I was constantly stretching my hamstrings. They started out super tight, but eventually they became too lax, and they weren't firing at the right times. I began to have some serious knee pain and some mild tendentious in my biceps femoris insertion. For rehab, I did slow and controlled straight-legged deadlifts in a full range of motion (along with a complete strength and conditioning protocol). It retrained my hamstrings to fire properly and I am actually far more flexible now (and 100 times stronger).

 

Sherri, you seem to know quite a bit about this stuff. What is it you do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how does a hamstring fire, let along fire at the wrong time? I don't know what that means. It sounds like you're trying to tune my VW. :confused:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crossfit baby! www.crossfitportland.com

 

Basically the best overall/core strength/metabolic workout, in a way fun/competitive group. Check it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Sherri, you seem to know quite a bit about this stuff. What is it you do?

 

Learn from my mistakes. :blush: Trailrunning is my main thing, but now I also roadbike and swim for cardio to balance things out. Used to just run, run, run, with no stretching or anything "soft"(ie -yoga, massage, trigger point therapy, etc) then got some nasty injuries in my back and hamstring. Not fun. :( Taught me some good lessons, though.

 

Now I'm stronger AND longer(ie-flexibility and relaxed muscles).

 

Sounds like you're getting it figured out, too. We all learn in our own ways, in our own time.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
how does a hamstring fire, let along fire at the wrong time? I don't know what that means. It sounds like you're trying to tune my VW. :confused:

 

 

A muscle "fires" in response to an action potential from a neuron. Basically, the "contraction signal" is sent down your spinal cord from the motor cortex in the brain and out to the working muscle. The greater the amplitude of that signal, the more motor units will "fire", and a greater number of muscle fibers will contract. Generally speaking, bigger signals will elicit bigger responses in muscles. It is an "all or nothing process" - meaning there are no "halfway contractions". The only thing that changes is the number of individual "firing" muscle cells.

 

So when I said that my hamstring wasn't "firing at the right time", I am talking about WHEN this whole contraction cascade happens. In order to properly stabilize joints during movement, muscles have to work together and equalize each other's force vectors. So what was [probably] going on, was that my biceps femoris was not contracting at the right time in order to provide that posterior (from the rear) force on my tibia. That way, my knee joint was slipping slightly anterior (to the front) and placing stress on the tendon of that muscle and my ACL (explaining my tendonitis and throbbing knee joint).

 

Did that help at all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×