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rock-ice

Rainier Prep Climb

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A friend and I who are climbing Rainier the weekend 3rd were planning on going for a prep climb to make sure he's truly ready this weekend. It was our intention to climb something like Adams or Little Tahoma, because they are fairly non-technical, but provide a good workout. Only one problem, my pal can't get friday off work for a long drive and approach hike. So, my question is does anyone know of a good non-technical day climb in preparation for Rainier.

Thanks

P.S. Is it at all practical to climb Little Tahoma in a day.

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Baker via Colman Demming isn't a bad idea. Saturday drive (3 hours from SEA) to TH, hike in and bivvy, Sunday climb and out. Or do it in a day.

 

Mailbox Peak, while not a "climb" is a nice way to gain 4,000 feet over 3 miles. Do it with a pack for extra! fun.

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If you've got the weekend, which it sounds like you might, do Glacier via Sitkum. It's in real nice shape, and it's a good workout. Do it in a day if you feel spunkier, wouldn't be too bad with light packs...

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Sorry, I didn't even mention it the reason I was looking for a day climb is because I have to be back by Saturday night even if that means late.

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Shuksan/Sulphide: I've met several people who left the trailhead at midnight, summitted by 8, and were back at the cars by noon. Climbing the summit pyramid does require 3rd - 4th class rock scrambling skills, though.

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Well, you could still give Glacier a go, if you really wanted a workout. It'd be 25-30 miles and 8000 feet up and down, but one hell of a shakedown cruise, with very few technical problems. You could also start hiking in later Friday night, since it's only 1.5 to 2 hours to the trailhead. If you want approach beta, PM me.

 

Other than that, for day climbs -- Whitehorse? Maybe too technical. Baker, as fred suggests, could definitely be done in a day, and a shorter one than Glacier for certain.

 

m

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I'd argue that Glacier peak is nowhere near 30 miles round trip....more like 20. I't be fun with a super light pack.

 

Eldorado Peak, car to car. Doesn't get you the elevation, but it's a loooong way straight up from the road. If you can start super early and return to seattle before dark, you're probably in good shape for Rainier. The route is mostly non technical, though you do peer into some crevases. Have fun!

 

[ 07-25-2002, 03:39 PM: Message edited by: Lambone ]

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you want altitude or just a workout? if you just want the latter and are pressed for time you could just do mt. si 2 or 3 times in one day. you could also just go up to muir (and maybe ingraham if they'll give you climbing permits for it) - that'll also get you more psyched for summiting.

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quote:

I'd argue that Glacier peak is nowhere near 30 miles round trip....more like 20. I't be fun with a super light pack.

Well, as I recall, it's about 10 into Boulder Basin. Tack 3 to 5 miles on to get to the summit, and that's pretty close to 30. Given the pace we were going and the time it took us, it sounds right to me...

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yeah maybe...sure does feel like 35!

 

I got a message from a fella who basicaly did the Frostbite car to car, with a short nap on the summit. impressive!

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[Eek!] yar! that's a long frickin' day... if i closed my eyes on the summit after all that hiking i'd probably be woken up by the hordes the next morning...

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Lambone,

Thanks for the Eldorado idea! I am taking a serious look at driving up after work Friday and getting a ways up the trail that night. One question. The becky guide says the trail heads difficult to locate. So, I'm concerned about arrive in the dark and not being able to even find the trail. Any advice?

Thanks

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The trailhead is not dificult to locate. It is a very obvious trial. Park, the walk back down the road (back the way you just came) for about 100 yrds. Some people say 50ft, but I don't know what the hell they are talking about, its at least a full 60m rope length. Anyway, make your first right on the well beaten trail.

 

The tricky part comes after you cross the big log that has fallen over the river. From there head more or less straight following the signs of obvious bushwacking, and be carefull of the tree branches that will try to kill you and steal your pack. Once back to the main trail the rest is pretty straight forward up to the talus fields. From there you are on your own.

 

It is pretty steep most of the way and I can't recall many good bivi spots. I would sleep in the car untill about 2 or 3am and then head up with the lightest pack possible.

 

Very beautiful place to visit. Have fun!

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Going up the Coleman-Deming is a good way to do Baker in a day. Just bivi in the forest at the trailhead. Eldorado via Roush? creek is very good too. Either way can be done in 12-16 hours. Glacier would take longer for most, I havent done it in a day but friends have, but the first 6 miles in is just a hike.

If you can do either Baker or Eldorado in a day you (or your friend) are ready for Rainier. Mailbox is good too if you dont have much time to drive from Seattle. It is more about how much elevation gain you get in a short time rather than how much distance you can cover over a long time when it comes to training for Rainier IMO. [big Grin]

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I've done Glacier Peak in a day, and it's a very long slog. Much longer than Sulphide glacier, Eldorado, or Baker, I think.

I bet if you hauled your friend up and down Glacier peak in a day, to "see if you're ready for Rainier" he'd say, man, this climbing stuff sucks!

What about Mt. Daniel? It's a good, full day, with some glacier travel, interesting scenery. Or Hood, for that matter, though the drive down and back is a drag. You'd probably want to leave town at midnight.

Either one of those would be far more interesting than Mailbox, or three laps up Mt. Si (though that would have a certain zen attraction to it. If you've got the self-discipline to do THAT, you can probably make yourself do just about anything.)

 

The problem with Little Tahoma, as I've whined about elsewhere, is that you have to register, and you can't register before 9:00 AM. Other than that, it seems like a pretty practical one-day climb, and people do it fairly frequently.

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I've actually done Daniel in a day as a training climb. I carried about 3 times as much stuff as nessicary to make it sufficently grueling.

 

As for this weekend I would gladly leave around midnight to get up Hood, Eldorado or Little Tahoma. The only problem will be convincing my friend that climbing several thousand vertical feet on no sleep is really as fun as it seems (and will be worth it on Rainier).

Thanks for the suggestion.

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What about the slog up South Spur of Adams? That would seem to be an easy choice for a day "hike" and get some elevation under the belt.

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My research indicates the most common form of training for Rainier is to talk about it as much as possible. If you can climb the Tooth, with less than 2 bivies, and post a Trip Report in less than 14 hours, you are ready for Mt. Rainier.

 

If you think the Tooth is not crowded enough, go do the hike to Camp Muir twice or all of Mt. Adams once, the latter being favored for altitude. leave tonight and you will home for dinner tomorow.

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Yes, climbing Little Tahoma is possible from the east side of the park in one day (don't know about the Paradise side) and would be an excellent prep climb. Also check out K Spire if approaching from the east.

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