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Gary_Yngve

favorite obscure classical composer/music?

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I am a woman who has very, very little body hair. What little I do have is blonde and pretty much invisible. Therefore, I consider body hair a very masculine trait and therefore sexy.

 

And I love music.

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Ah yes, Apocalyptica. Cellos playing Metallica! Colin queued some up the other night. Cool stuff. I'm drifting from classical, but he also had a performer he described as "the Bob Marley from Pakistan" who was cool too.

 

Lately I've been listening to Piazzolla at home and Grieg at work.

Got a really cool CD of Vivaldi's Four Seasons interleaved with Piazzolla's Seasons.

 

Can you recommend an excellent recording of Grieg's piano concerto? Bonus points if it comes with Schumann's piano concerto. I bought a CD many years ago and never got into it and have determined it's because the recording sucks (based on other works I've replaced). It's taken me a couple of years to learn to hear the difference in interpretation, and figure out what I like.

 

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...I consider body hair a very masculine trait and therefore sexy.

 

Then you'd be in overdrive if you ever came across me. :smirk:

 

By way of analogy, I have a friend and former climbing partner with whom I still keep in touch. When his girls were much younger, and I would come over for a visit, he used to tell them, "Don't feed the bears..."

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Lately I've been listening to Piazzolla at home and Grieg at work.

Got a really cool CD of Vivaldi's Four Seasons interleaved with Piazzolla's Seasons.

 

Can you recommend an excellent recording of Grieg's piano concerto? Bonus points if it comes with Schumann's piano concerto. I bought a CD many years ago and never got into it and have determined it's because the recording sucks (based on other works I've replaced). It's taken me a couple of years to learn to hear the difference in interpretation, and figure out what I like.

Come over to my house after a pub club and I'll play you the first movement of either the Grieg or the Schumann piano concertos on my piano!

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Come over to my house after a pub club and I'll play you the first movement of either the Grieg or the Schumann piano concertos on my piano!

 

My dream is for any of my kids to be able to do that. They're taking lessons now.

 

How long did it take you to get to that level of skill?

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Chopin for me. I have a lifetime goal of learning to play all of his works, but for now I've only knocked out a couple of Preludes, a handful of Nocturnes, and some Valses.

 

eta-oops-I just read the "obscure" part. I guess Chopin could be considered run of the mill, but he's still my favorite.

Edited by Mrs. G

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Do you find that climbing hard interferes with your violin? The next day after climbing hard interferes with my cello.

 

Yeah, my finger dexterity suffers a bit sometimes, and I have issues with my back and shoulders. But the bigger issue is being distracted by climbing and not having a consistent practice routine. you're at UW? Are you involved in the music program there at all?

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Chopin for me. I have a lifetime goal of learning to play all of his works, but for now I've only knocked out a couple of Preludes, a handful of Nocturnes, and some Valses.

 

eta-oops-I just read the "obscure" part. I guess Chopin could be considered run of the mill, but he's still my favorite.

Heavens! Don't call him "run of the mill"! Popular and exceptional. He wrote some very difficult piano pieces. I still remember my college room mate trying to master one of them and the expletives that would come out when he made a mistake.

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Honestly man! Consider your audience here! Do they look cultured to you?

 

lynyrd skynerd where i come from

Edited by pink

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Chopin for me. I have a lifetime goal of learning to play all of his works, but for now I've only knocked out a couple of Preludes, a handful of Nocturnes, and some Valses.

 

eta-oops-I just read the "obscure" part. I guess Chopin could be considered run of the mill, but he's still my favorite.

 

I love playing his minute waltz even though I butcher it bad.

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I know-he's not run of the mill, but he's probably one of the most recognizable classical compossers since many of his songs have been used in movies and commercials (the Piano is the best example). I figured that puts him way out of the obscure category, but he's still my fave.

 

I agree-he did write some demanding peices. I'm still trying to learn Fantasie Impromptu, which is 3 against 4 rhythm for about half of the song.

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I love playing 3 against 4.

 

I came up with a tune where I play alternating figures of 5 and seven against a drummer's 6 or 12. It rocks, but requires focus.

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Mother of god, I saw the Carmina Burana performance last night at Benaroya Hall. It started off with a solo violinist, then intermission and then O Fortuna to start things off. Wow, that was awesome...

 

Basically 100+ people singing, three soloists, and the full orchestra. Throw in primo seating and I could've cried at various points, it was so vibrant and powerful.

 

So if this ever comes to your neck of the woods, go. There may be better versions on iTunes, but I bought the Boston Symphony/Ozawa version and it kicks butt. Nothing like the real thing though, props to all the performers last night.

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Yeah, my finger dexterity suffers a bit sometimes, and I have issues with my back and shoulders. But the bigger issue is being distracted by climbing and not having a consistent practice routine. you're at UW? Are you involved in the music program there at all?

 

Yeah, CS PhD student at UW. No real affiliations with music dept, though I practice in their rooms when I have a piano accompaniment and I take advantage of listening to their recitals (dirtbags note that they often have nice food spreads afterward).

 

When I play too long, I also get a tightness in my left shoulder that causes numbness/poor motor in my left hand. Improving my posture has helped with it, although it still kicks in after 2-3 hours of casual playing or an hour of Bach's suites without rest.

 

Cello's been lying low for over half a year though with all the other occupiers of my time (graduating, teaching, climbing, job search, girlfriend, etc.).

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I know-he's not run of the mill, but he's probably one of the most recognizable classical compossers since many of his songs have been used in movies and commercials (the Piano is the best example). I figured that puts him way out of the obscure category, but he's still my fave.

 

I agree-he did write some demanding peices. I'm still trying to learn Fantasie Impromptu, which is 3 against 4 rhythm for about half of the song.

 

I love playing 3 against 4.

 

Any tips on practicing this other than working each hand individually? My Chopin book remains closed far too often because of this kind of thing, which I've never really been able to master.

 

. . . Carmina Burana . . . Nothing like the real thing though . . .

 

I was fortunate enough to play trombone for this several years ago and it was loads of fun.

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Mother of god, I saw the Carmina Burana performance last night at Benaroya Hall. It started off with a solo violinist, then intermission and then O Fortuna to start things off. Wow, that was awesome...

 

I went to the Saturday 2:00pm performance and was equally thrilled, except for one thing... That dirty whore of a percussionist didn't play the gong leading up to the last O Fortuna!!! He warmed it up and looked like he was getting ready to hit it, then he just decided not to! Did he screw it up for the night performance too? I think it may have been a retaliation towards the audience who insisted on clapping after nearly every soloist finished a section.

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Yeah, CS PhD student at UW. No real affiliations with music dept, though I practice in their rooms when I have a piano accompaniment and I take advantage of listening to their recitals (dirtbags note that they often have nice food spreads afterward).

 

I was at UW for a year before I transferred (it's a bad situation in that music dept).. but yeah, being slightly sore or injured makes it less motivating to put in lots of hours of practice.

 

And going to recitals for free food=Dirtbag points.

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Mother of god, I saw the Carmina Burana performance last night at Benaroya Hall. It started off with a solo violinist, then intermission and then O Fortuna to start things off. Wow, that was awesome...

 

I went to the Saturday 2:00pm performance and was equally thrilled, except for one thing... That dirty whore of a percussionist didn't play the gong leading up to the last O Fortuna!!! He warmed it up and looked like he was getting ready to hit it, then he just decided not to! Did he screw it up for the night performance too? I think it may have been a retaliation towards the audience who insisted on clapping after nearly every soloist finished a section.

 

Jeeperz, you'd think that we were a cultured bunch with comments such as this. :laf:

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Mother of god, I saw the Carmina Burana performance last night at Benaroya Hall. It started off with a solo violinist, then intermission and then O Fortuna to start things off. Wow, that was awesome...

 

I went to the Saturday 2:00pm performance and was equally thrilled, except for one thing... That dirty whore of a percussionist didn't play the gong leading up to the last O Fortuna!!! He warmed it up and looked like he was getting ready to hit it, then he just decided not to! Did he screw it up for the night performance too? I think it may have been a retaliation towards the audience who insisted on clapping after nearly every soloist finished a section.

 

Jeeperz, you'd think that we were a cultured bunch with comments such as this. :laf:

 

Who's to say the conductor didn't wave him off the shot?Don't hate the percussionist. He is the target of enough misplaced elitism and ire. He's like the punter on a pro football team.

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