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MissQ

Camp Muir - first timer

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Didn't think there would be a sign like 'Danger, you're on a glacier' but never know.

 

Although I don't think they have experience specifically for navigating white out conditions, we all have training at navigating by compass in low visibility conditions from Scuba diving experience.

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Funny that you mention burgers and beer b/c that is what the brother says he's going to eat on the way up:

"It's gonna be cheeseburgers and beer dude"

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Didn't think there would be a sign like 'Danger, you're on a glacier' but never know.

 

Trust me, some people expect this, and are affronted when the signs don't appear. Interesting related reading here in almost any issue.

 

Although I don't think they have experience specifically for navigating white out conditions, we all have training at navigating by compass in low visibility conditions from Scuba diving experience.

 

This should help. Find and download the "Get Your Bearings" page that KK referred to on Page 1 and carry it with you. You might also be able to pick one up at the Ranger's sign-in office if you arrive when they're open. Get your blue bags there, too.

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Kurt,

 

You're correct in your assumptions...we are tenting it (I guess the reservations were a waste?) and I am new to snow...be as condescending as you see fit smile.gif Are there signs (natural or man-made) to warn you if you're heading too far in the wrong direction?

 

To echo what others have already said, "No" and "No".

 

No, your reservation wasn't a waste. You now have peace of mind that you have a spot and you're there legally. If you were to get your permit the day of your outing, it would've been free (I think you probably paid a $20 "reservation" fee?) but chances are all the allocated spaces would have already been taken and you would've been SOL.

 

And no, except for the obvious gaping holes in the snow and 75 degree snow slopes, there are no signs that you've wandered the wrong way. That's why people are telling you not to wander around up there in a white-out.

 

If you go past Camp Muir... you've gone too far! Just stay on the flat of the Muir Snowfield and you'll do OK.

 

The problem folks encounter up there is that as they're heading up, it's not really apparent that they are making kind of a long sweeping left turn. So... when they come down, they just come straight down the fall line of the slope... which does NOT lead them to where they want to go. You have to make a conscious "right turn" as you come down. It's obvious in nice weather, not so obvious when you can't see where you're going.

 

And don't let that last 1000 vertical feet wear you down. You WILL eventually get there... it just SEEMS like it's taking forever.

 

-kurt

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I wasn't kidding in my TR when I said 700 people. I have never seen that many people on one hike before. Japanese tourists. Extremos totally geared to the gills. Old folks out for an afternoon stroll. Mom, Pop, and the kids. The Swedish Bikini Team. Snowboarders. Skiers. Mountie brigades. More than one person carrying their baby up in a baby backpack thinger. All following a boot track bigger than I-5 past wands placed every 50 feet all the way up to Muir.

 

Of course, if it is dumping snow or they haven't put out wands, then it could be different for you.

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Now the real question is, do you know how to use them? evils3d.gif

 

Some versions that I've seen others employ have been quite hilarious...

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On a nice, warm summer day ... it's like little lines of ants walking up what seems to be and endless hill. smile.gif

 

Look for a favorable forecast to potentially avoid route finding problems (but be prepared if weather moves in quickly) ... and by all means ... wear your sunscreen!

 

Be prepared and have a great time!

 

Brianna

 

5795IMG_5939_S_.JPG

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Now the real question is, do you know how to use them? evils3d.gif

 

Some versions that I've seen others employ have been quite hilarious...

 

 

Sure she does. She just hands the bag to her brother after finishing her business and says "You take care of it since we woulda been up here 2 hours earlier if it wasn't for your sorry..."

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Sure she does. She just hands the bag to her brother after finishing her business and says "You take care of it since we woulda been up here 2 hours earlier if it wasn't for your sorry..."

 

yelrotflmao.gifyelrotflmao.gifyelrotflmao.gif Now that's one I haven't seen yet! yellaf.gif

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Funny that you mention burgers and beer b/c that is what the brother says he's going to eat on the way up:

"It's gonna be cheeseburgers and beer dude"

 

Maybe you should go to Squamish instead, that way you have the chance to climb and eat the same thing.

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It is as likely as not that you will have gorgeous weather and many other people on the route with you. But if you are at all concerned about weather, you might just post back here as the date gets near and just ask if anyone with some experience feels like going along with you, even if it's just a day trip for them to accompany you up to Muir. There are a ton of folks on this board who have done this trip many times, who are always up for a slog up the snowfield if breakfast and/or beer (preferably at the same time) is part of the deal.

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It is as likely as not that you will have gorgeous weather and many other people on the route with you. But if you are at all concerned about weather, you might just post back here as the date gets near and just ask if anyone with some experience feels like going along with you, even if it's just a day trip for them to accompany you up to Muir. There are a ton of folks on this board who have done this trip many times, who are always up for a slog up the snowfield if breakfast and/or beer (preferably at the same time) is part of the deal.
thumbs_up.gifbigdrink.gif

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I was wondering if anyone would be up for that but thought 'what experienced climber wants to spend a day hangin out w/ a bunch of kooks trying to get to Muir' but I never thought of beer as bargaining power! I will def put a post up when the date gets closer and mention pints of Guinness included smile.gif

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...and mention pints of Guinness included smile.gif

 

Guinness?? My radar just locked on. thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

 

Do ya think you could bring along some Fat Tire as well? That way, I could make Black & Tans... bigdrink.gif

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A look up the snowfield from the side. Taken on a bluebird day in July of last year.

 

Large photo is here . You can make out a faint boot path.

Edited by KaskadskyjKozak

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One thing that I have done in the past when I been expected to guide people of questionable fitness level is that I take them out on a tuff hike close by with no exposure or risks. If they don't make it I haven't wasted my time and money on a failed climb.

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1282MuirClusterfromKautz04.jpg

 

I took this photo last June while doing a conditioning hike and caching some gear for an attempt the following weekend - and the crowds in this photo were light compared to the megacluster we witnessed next weekend.

 

So - in good conditions routefinding shouldn't be a problem - but I've been up there in spring when some wicked weather has blown through and even familiarity with the route, map, compass, bearings - GPS, etc and experience using them in low visibility conditions navigation was still quite a challenge.

 

Sounds like you are doing your homework and preparing so you should be fine.

 

Enjoy yourselves up there.

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A few years ago we passed a conga line of National Guardsmen who were heading to Muir as we were leaving. Must have been 50 or more of them out on a day trip. Most in jeans and sneakers. None wearing crampons or using ice axes. Some wearing socks as gloves.

 

Didn't look like they were enjoying themselves much.

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Donald Rumsfeld would have told them "You don't hike to Muir with the equipment you'd like to have, you hike to Muir with the equipment you've got. Now put your socks on your hands and stop complaining!"

 

Wonder how much mileage I can get out of that quote.

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