Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
sk

Muffy owns skis

Recommended Posts

now what do I do??

 

seriously any advice sugestions or rude remarks are welcome. Please help Muffy learn to ski grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of skis? Have you skiied before? What is your objective in use of said skis (lift-served only, backcountry, ski mtnrg, etc)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
now what do I do??

 

seriously any advice sugestions or rude remarks are welcome. Please help Muffy learn to ski grin.gif

 

Get a leason, because you will not listen to your friends if the try to teach you...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Get a leason, because you will not listen to your friends if the try to teach you...

Get a lesson because you can seriously damage a friendship having a friend teach you how to ski.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Get a leason, because you will not listen to your friends if the try to teach you...

 

yes to getting a leash on, but Muffy should take lessons as well wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't opend tha box yet so I don't know what kind of skis... I do know they have tele bindings. I have never skied or anything even close. I have no idea what I am doing or even what is possible.

 

Feejee can you tell me where there are free lessons?? I would be into those grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds like Santa did really deliver these, given the air of mystery...

 

The basics of skiing, as long as your skis have metal edges, are simple, whether you have modern alpine bindings, tele bindings, or duct tape bindings. If you apply weight to the edge of the ski, it carves a turn. Take the weight off, and the ski (and skiier) fall downhill under gravity's influence in the direction of the most gradient.

 

The tele aspect will make things more difficult, as you will have to work harder to transmit your intention through the binding to the ski. However, if you do well on a tele setup, you will tend to be a better skiier overall because you can't cheat as much if you want to get down the hill gracefully.

 

Simple, right? Well.....

 

It may be you would have to throw yourself on the mercy of some benevolent friends to get started. After that, depending on how you feel about your progress and your overall goals, lessons are indeed a good idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I haven't opend tha box yet so I don't know what kind of skis... I do know they have tele bindings. I have never skied or anything even close. I have no idea what I am doing or even what is possible.

 

Feejee can you tell me where there are free lessons?? I would be into those grin.gif

 

Tele, eh? for your first time defanatly do not go on a powder day, go on 4-5 day packed snow. its easy just strap em on and go... down hill turning is not so easy. for that, get some practice on the groomers, or you will be very frusterated when you get out into some powder...

 

I'd give ya a lesson, but I don't think you will like me very much afterward, plus I'm not that great with my telemarking...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I haven't opend tha box yet so I don't know what kind of skis... I do know they have tele bindings. I have never skied or anything even close. I have no idea what I am doing or even what is possible.

 

Feejee can you tell me where there are free lessons?? I would be into those grin.gif

 

Tele, eh? for your first time defanatly do not go on a powder day, go on 4-5 day packed snow. its easy just strap em on and go... down hill turning is not so easy. for that, get some practice on the groomers, or you will be very frusterated when you get out into some powder...

 

I'd give ya a lesson, but I don't think you will like me very much afterward, plus I'm not that great with my telemarking...

if you are serious I would take you up on a lesson.we already went threw that part where we didn't like eachother tongue.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I haven't opend tha box yet so I don't know what kind of skis... I do know they have tele bindings. I have never skied or anything even close. I have no idea what I am doing or even what is possible.

 

Feejee can you tell me where there are free lessons?? I would be into those grin.gif

 

Tele, eh? for your first time defanatly do not go on a powder day, go on 4-5 day packed snow. its easy just strap em on and go... down hill turning is not so easy. for that, get some practice on the groomers, or you will be very frusterated when you get out into some powder...

 

I'd give ya a lesson, but I don't think you will like me very much afterward, plus I'm not that great with my telemarking...

if you are serious I would take you up on a lesson.we already went threw that part where we didn't like eachother tongue.gif

 

yelrotflmao.gifwink.gif

Like I said, My Telemarking is not that great and I haven't done it in years... If it were just alpine I could have you skiing black Diamonds and ripping through powder in a matter of a month or so... Your more than welcome to held into the mountains with us any time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sure bases are flat and tips and tails are detuned, especially if they are coming out of a box. The shop where you bought them can help you. Nothing is worse then trying to learn to ski on skis that aren't tuned properly. Then wax them so they are slicker than snot! Remember, there is a left and right to a tele ski.

 

Bend zee knees!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
will you come back and get me when you are done?? blush.gif

 

I'll even pick you out of the snow bank when you go flying head first into the snow... yellaf.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
will you come back and get me when you are done?? blush.gif

 

I'll even pick you out of the snow bank when you go flying head first into the snow... yellaf.gif

COOL bigdrink.gifbigdrink.gifbigdrink.giffruit.giffruit.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Make sure bases are flat and tips and tails are detuned, especially if they are coming out of a box. The shop where you bought them can help you. Nothing is worse then trying to learn to ski on skis that aren't tuned properly. Then wax them so they are slicker than snot! Remember, there is a left and right to a tele ski.

 

Bend zee knees!

you mean I havr yto know my left from my right?? Oh SHIT shocked.gifcry.gif this will be a long hard lesson I see cantfocus.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ooh...tele skis....that's my other new thing to learn this winter...gonna have my ski shop friend teach me how soon....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may want to consider returning the bindings for a rando setup. Having your first skiing experieince on tele gear can be tough.

 

Though whatever you do take a lesson first (an alpine lesson would be fine even if you're on tele gear).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely do take lessons;no sense wasting time trying to re-invent the wheel.Note that I said lessons,plural.One lesson will get you started,but there's quite a bit to it.QUITE a bit.A good way to do it is to really commit to it; go skiing as often as possible;start with a lesson,then go skiing by yourself three or four times( going just by yourself for at least your first few times will give you the uninterrupted focus and attention you'll need to feel and listen to your body,find your center,and let it all start to sink in) to digest and work on what you got from the lesson,then take another lesson,go another 3-4 times on your own,and so on,right through the season.

 

It will be easiest if you go lift-served skiing on the groomed,for two reasons: it's going to take awhile to get your ski legs and conditioning anyway,and riding the lifts will give you a rest break after each run,allowing you to focus on just the skiing itself.Second,the groomed surface will be much,much easier to deal with until you develop the strength and technique for off-piste.Don't be in too much of a hurry to go backcountry until your basic skills are pretty well in hand.There's a lot going on with the terrain,avalanche hazard,navigation,weather,etc. that are pretty damned unforgiving if you're not yet up to the demands it can place on you.The mountain and the snow will still be there by the time you're ready.Patience,grasshoppa.

 

Instructors?Unless your friends are expert skiers AND skilled,trained instructors,you really,really are FAR better off getting lessons from certified PSIA(Professional Ski Instructors of America) people.ESPECIALLY since you've never skied before.A good professional will be far more effective and efficient in taking you through the process in the correct sequence,and while they may eventually become your friend,to begin with they are completely professional, impartial,and endlessly patient in helping you through what can be very difficult and frustrating,and yes, dangerous,if you don't know what you're doing.They are there to see that your transition from ordinary human grub to the realm of the gods is as enjoyable and painless as possible, they're damned good at it,and they're not impatient to be off as soon as it looks like you're not going to break your neck, to go do their own skiing.Believe me,it is money well spent.Yvon Chouinard once said that all climbers are the product of their first 2 or 3 climbs.And if those were good experiences,it can make a huge difference in the kind of climber you become.That's equally true of skiing.There are too many sad stories of people whose friends took them out for their first time, and they wound up hating it,never doing it again,selling their skis.That is absolutely NOT necessary.And,after seven seasons,I still take at least a couple of lessons a year,and am planning to do the TeleClinic(mentioned below) again this June.

 

I'm not sure what's available in or near Eugene,but the best instruction I've had(and who I first started with) is Wyeast Nordic of Sandy,OR. Shelly Butler is the owner/head instructor and she is just excellent,fantastic.Her instructors are the very finest,such great people,and many of them have become my good friends over the years.It would be worth the nickel to give her a call and see whom she could recommend around Eugene,I'm certain she could steer you to the right people.Get in touch with her at:

 

Wyeast Nordic-Telemark,X-country

(503)622-4841

email:wyeast@transport.com

www.wyeastnordic.com

 

Shelly also holds a summer Telemark Clinic every year for 4 days in both June and July,on Mt. Hood,and I've been to it three times,including the first two seasons I was learning to tele.You can't beat it: a dozen or more the world's best telemark skier/instructors of long experience,impeccable credentials,delightful personality and warmth,and diamond examples of the elegant beauty and freedom that you yourself can and will attain as a skier and ski mountaineer.And all for about $135 for the four days,plus you have to buy your own lift tickets,as well as lodging and meals.Class sizes are purposely kept small,so there's a lot of one-on-one with the instructors,plus you ski with several different instructors over the 4 days, to get a very complete ,well-rounded overview and evaluation.Most of the time there will be, at most only 5 or so other students in your class,and sometimes it's just you and 1 or 2 others,which is like getting an all-day private in-depth lesson.Also,they video you every day and everyone gets to review it all together at the end of the day.With this kind of focus,you can really learn a lot and make great progress in building your foundation skills;it won't necessarily feel like it right there in class, but the next time you get out on your own or with friends,you'll know right away that something is way different.YEEEEEEEHOOOAAAAH!!! is the best way I know of to describe what that feels like.

 

OK,homework.Get the following books and just wear 'em out.

 

Free Heel Skiing by Paul Parker--the best,the Bible.

 

Ski The Whole Mountain by Eric and Rob DesLauriers--More adavanced,but it will quickly bring you up to speed on modern equipment and technique,and give you something to look forward to.Excellent chapter on backcountry.

 

Allen and Mike's Really Cool Telemark Tips(109 Amazing Tips to improve your tele-skiing)--by Allen O'Bannon and Mike Clelland--Yes,it is really cool,very funny(great cartoon illustrations,very clear)and spot on solid.

 

Allen and Mike's Really Cool Backcountry Ski Book-same authors;everything you need to know about becoming a sane,safe and saavy backcountry old salt.

 

Guide books: Oregon Descents--by David L. Waag

 

BackcountrySki! Oregon--by Christopher Van Tilburg

 

These are both excellent,and give a good overview,as well as evaluation and ratings of difficulty of tours and routes.They'll keep you out of trouble so you don't get off into areas that are over your head before you've got the skills and experience to handle them.

 

Magazines:

 

Backcountry

 

Couloir

 

Off-Piste

 

Abandon

 

Also there are great websites such as TelemarkTips,Turns All Year,and others you can find through the Freshiez forum on another great website known as cascadeclimbers.com(!)

 

Can't think of much else for now.Any further questions,feel free to PM or e-mail me.Best of luck,best of snow,hope to see you out there.

 

wave.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow; mtguide sure gave you lots of great resources.

 

just want to add that you should definitely take a lesson from a certified instructor. it will make all the difference in the world. well, maybe not ALL ... but you'll be skiing better and looking better than all of your friends in no time. wink.gif

 

also, i don' t think you answered bobinc's question about what you wanted to do with your skiing.

 

the first thing you're going to have to do is buy boots. this is the most important thing you're going to do. (taking a lesson is the second most.) what you want to do will determine what kind of boots you get ...

 

or did those come in the box too? (LOL!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hang on. Do they have cross country bindings or tele bindings? Are they short and fat or long and skinny? If the latter is true, much of the advice above no longer applies.

 

RIP IT UP! LOL!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×