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What age to start kids skiing?

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I have a 3 1/2 year old. He wants to go and I found him some skis (still need boots). Will he learn anything or is earlier better?

How old were you when you learned?

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My 2 nieces and nephew all started at 3 years. This was surprising since my sister is overly protective to the extreme (easy for me to say since I am not a mother). This year at the age of 8, my niece skied her first double diamonds. My sister currently rents the kids gear seasonally instead of buying it.

 

At 4, my parents stuck me in the ski center's daycare. Apparently I cried bloody murder and pouted until they set me free and gave me skis. It was a bad approach since I still cry & pout if I don't get to the mountains enough. I was not allowed on the chairlift for the first few days. Instead, I was taught by hiking up with my gear and pizza-slice-skiing down what appeared at the time to be a massive hill next to the lodge…I quickly learned. The T-bar was the most terrifying though riding the one at SkiBowl now brings a stupid grin to my face. Great memories.

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I have three kids and they all started between age 3-5. I found 3 was too young, and 4 or 5 worked better, but it depends on the kid, and as with all (internet) advice YMMV.

 

My youngest is 10 and has been skiing double-black diamond slopes for 2 years now. He is better then me on the narrow wooded stuff now (like Wild Katz at Stevens). :-/

 

Good luck and have fun!

 

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my boy started this year at 4yo. I don't know if he would have taken the instructions as well before that. So the best age is very dependent on his/her take on teachers. My boy is a bit of a rebel.

 

We had a season pass at stevens that had unlimited lessons. This helps a lot as the first 4 lessons are not much learning involved. That would hurt to pay the regular price. Wherever your local hill is, I would look into such a deal.

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Will he learn anything or is earlier better?

 

i don't understand your question above: "will he learn anything"?

 

if he wants to go, take him. have fun and see what happens. be smart about supporting his endeavor, and remember, it's about him not you.

 

we took our just-turned-3 yr old out for the first time, and she had a blast! we just walked her up the hill a bit, had her tell us when she wanted to go, and man she loved it. tomorrow was either climbing or skiing, and guess what she picked. next time out it'll be probably be the discovery chair at crystal.

 

i'm sure she would have had just as much fun at 2 1/2, or 10 1/2, meaning i don't think there's any magic age for having fun in the snow!

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if he wants to go, take him. have fun and see what happens. be smart about supporting his endeavor, and remember, it's about him not you.

Sound advice - keep it fun and the learning will happen. Specifically: pick good weather, keep their favorite snacks in your pocket, make sure clothes are comfy and warm, be super patient and prepared to go inside or home whenever goal #1 isn't happening.

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taking my boy out to daisy chair at stevens for the afternoon today. no teacher. fun day ahead fur sure. yeah it is about spending time with the little ones.

 

If your question is about value for lessons, then you have to ask if the child is able to take directions well from strangers.

(why is it that children take directions form strangers better than their own parents?)

Edited by genepires

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My boy started at 3. Backcountry XC skiing @ Mt.Hood..

He loved it...was a natural on skis...

 

Now he's 8 and skis with a pack up to 8miles on the most difficult trails and lots of backcountry..

 

I didn't ski until I was 20....! My parents weren't skiers...

Edited by Scoobyclimbs

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If he wants to go, then he is ready. I have taught skiing for over 20 years. SOmetime between 3 - 5 is right. THere are 3 year olds that can conquer the green slopes within a few weeks, and 5 year old that aren't ready.

 

Plus one - he wants to.

 

Get him on ice skates or roller blades if you can. That developes the internal and external rotator muscles that just do't develop from walking in a straight line.

 

Wait for a sunny, warm day. Give him to a pro. Go away so he can listen to someone else without performing for you. Give him the promised reward.

 

For a 3 year old, my expectations are 45 minutes of magic carpet work, 15 minutes of snow agnel/snowball fight/snowman building. Then you are ready for 45 more minutes of work. Day one, maybe master the straight run and the gliding wedge. Day two you can get those stops working. Day three - begin to turn. Once the turns and stops are there, the kids will then generally begin to tolerate a while day - 2 2 hour sessions on the snow. After 1 - 2 days on the bunny slope, they will graduate to the gentle greens. The learning curve really ramps up when they get that mileage in.

 

Be sure their gear fits right and they are well fed and rested. Then they have the fuel to be successful.

 

THe following year, you will have a fun partner to ski with. THen your issue will be how to keep them from doing the crazy stuff......

 

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