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JasonG

Taping feet on long approach/deproach

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Just wondering if folks have a certain brand of tape that they use for taping feet when using thermo liners (which don't appear to breathe). Normally my boots are fine for a long day out in the hills, but sometimes when I have had to walk a few miles on trails (think exit to Garibaldi Neve traverse) I get some raw spots. The standard athletic tape seems to sweat off rather quickly...but maybe I've just been using the wrong stuff?

 

Have others had this issue, and what have you done? Other than getting out more to toughen the feet that is. . .. ;)

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Leukotape. There's nothing better that I've ever tried. Expensive but it'll stay on for a few days if you dry and clean your feet before application.

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Jason, swing by your local drugstore and pick up a bottle of Benzoin Simple Tincture. I've carried a small plastic bottle of it in my first aid kit for years. Before applying moleskin or tape on my feet I sparingly rub a little of the tincture on the area of foot in question, let it dry for a minute, then apply the moleskin or tape. The tincture greatly enhances adhesion, but not to point that you'll remove skin when you remove the moleskin/tape. I regularly apply it on day 1 of a muli-day ski or climbing trip and it will stick throughout.

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Benzoin is a good idea but, also, the quality of the tape that you buy may also be a question. When I used to hike for a living I used to go to a medical supply place on First Hill (the "medical district" in Seattle) to get tape that was far superior to the stuff available at most places.

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Great suggestions all! I have tried various types of duct tape over the years and it doesn't seem to stick as well as athletic tape. In my experience, liner socks seem to bunch after a lot of skinning and they rarely are long enough to cover to the top of a ski boot (at least the ones I have seen typically).

 

I will try and seek out some higher quality tape and will try the Benzoin also. Thanks for the quick feedback everyone!

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In my experience, liner socks seem to bunch after a lot of skinning and they rarely are long enough to cover to the top of a ski boot (at least the ones I have seen typically

Wigwam / Ultimax makes liners which are almost knee high.

 

Thin liners plus a mid-weight sock has been my recipe for staying blister free on everything from touring for turns to 40km in a day death marches.

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One thing that has saved me from blisters is runners socks. They are made up of two thin layers which I wear under a thicker sock. I haven't had any problems since I started using them, even with heavy mountaineering boots.

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In my experience, liner socks seem to bunch after a lot of skinning and they rarely are long enough to cover to the top of a ski boot (at least the ones I have seen typically

Wigwam / Ultimax makes liners which are almost knee high.

 

Thin liners plus a mid-weight sock has been my recipe for staying blister free on everything from touring for turns to 40km in a day death marches.

 

the liners i use come up about mid-calf, but i don't ski, just hike/climb... so for my purposes/boots, they give me a nice frictionless barrier. no blisters, even on my slightly too-big plastics. no tape to roll up/fall off/bunch up.

 

started using liners in the army... i'm sure real "liners" existed, but we used our dress socks as pre-history liners, and it solved most guys' blister problems so well that it just became the standard method. thin wool under thick wool- all sliding happens between sock layers instead of between skin and sock.

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I am a "heavy sweater", and in my experience foot perspiration is a primary contributor to blisters. I have found that using "Certain Dri" antiperspirant for several days before a climb or long approach reduces foot perspiration almost completely. With perspiration reduced or eliminated, any tape will adhere better. I have recently begun using Leukotape, which adheres very strongly, resists any moisture, and the adhesive doesn't gunk up my expensive wool socks, like Duct tape does.

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I got some Leukotape and tried it out on the Wapta last week. Wow! That stuff sticks like no other, staying on for the duration of the trip. Thanks for the suggestion, I have found the right tape.

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I also find that rubbing some of the athletic tape sticky stuff on the area in question before taping helps it stick way better. I assume that's because you're getting rid of any oils on the skin.

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In the really tough situations apply tincture of benzoin first, then the leukotape over the top.

 

Yes, I have done so on a few occasions. The best of both world's in my opinion.

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