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Josh Lewis

Is Mount Stuart Technicle?

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My God.. I just read some of his TR's. I thought I sometimes did weird things in the mountains.. but never like THAT!!!!!!

Wierd things.... like what?! Now you gotta remember, I'm one of the craziest guys I know. Nowatleast I accept that I'm crazy, and I'll probably always be crazy! Gahahahhahahahhahaha! Perhaps yout jealous that you didn't get to have several crazy adventures.... man I love being me! Although sometimes it's well fun. The crazier it gets, the funner it gets!

 

I am very jealous of your skillz Josh... I wish I climbed as hard as you...

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evolution is dead if Josh doesn't go to aconcogua. the big mountains have a way of thinning out the gene pool.

 

I, too, am a huge fan of evolution.

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I am very jealous of your skillz Josh... I wish I climbed as hard as you...

It was a joke... :rolleyes: I haven't climbed much any ways... :( .... yet.

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Always settle for Aconcagua?? Josh you need to learn some respect. Mountains, and your choices in them, could kill you in a minute.

How are you expecting to get up Aconcagua or Denali if you are having issues on much smaller mountains? You should re-read all 9 pages and your other various posts and see what other vastly more experienced people are suggesting to you.

 

I don't expect to do those without lots of climbing experience.

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Great thread Josh, be careful of fame though. Don't climb to impress anyone else, it will get you in trouble quick.

 

Really good story, the biking to Columbia Peak. Don't listen to the naysayers, it sounds like you're doing okay, just be careful. You have been learning from your mistakes correct? You learned that a foam pad is necessary when bivying on snow. And it sounds like you knew when to turn around which is important.

 

Let me point out some other mistakes you're making, because I don't think you realize them.

 

The cramping and susceptibility to cold is from dehydration, you need to drink more water. Drink before you eat cuz water absorption goes down when you eat, and maybe shed layers quicker before you sweat. You should be down to just shorts on a summer approach if you start to really sweat. Drinking water from streams is taking chances, I do it all the time, but some argue against it cuz of giardia. Usually the melt right at the bottom of snowfields and glaciers is safe. But 6 water bottles and carrying 9 pounds of water on Rainier is way too much, you need a small stove, and melt snow as you go.

 

Taco Bell is garbage food, it's not in a top notch athletes diet. IF you're going to eat fast food, Taco Time is a little better. But any fast food has way too much salt which doesn't help with hydration. At your age it's ok after a climb but it's not a positive thing before a climb or on a bike approach.

 

Look at the weather forecast before you leave home and pay attention to it. If you're online here posting you can go online and get a weather forecast.

 

There's nothing wrong with Cascadian Couloir on Stuart. Sure it's the walk-up but it's a good thing to do the walk-up first if you're ever going to do a technical route on Stuart, that way you know the descent which is the most important part of any climb.

 

When you talk about finding the trail after crossing snow on Columbia, that's called routefinding instinct. You need that near the top of Stuart because it sort of winds around some obstacles near the top on the summit ridge. Always look back as you go up, so you know what it looks like going down, especially as you go around obstacles, turn corners etc.

 

Maybe think about a bivy sack when the weather is ok, lighter than a tent.

 

I wouldn't even do Stuart if it's going to rain, lightning and rockfall even in the Cascadian, and low visibility off route can put you out on steeper ground when you're coming down.

 

At your age and experience I wouldn't try to do Stuart in one day. Make it at least two and that's not counting any bike approach LOLZ!

 

I would avoid Rainier unless you've got at least 2 or 3 experienced adults on the trip. And that means a high level of experience. The objective hazard is just really high, and the fitness level is tough for a 16 yo. Rainier is at another level compared to the other volcanoes. And clue Taco Time ain't the training fuel for Rainier.

 

And while your bouncing around the house for a month between climbs, stop procrastinating and fix the brakes on your bike. Alpine climbing is about having your gear straight as much as it is about anything.

 

Did you have all the pack weight on your back when you were biking? If you did that's the hard way to go and wastes a lot of energy. Get just a little cheapy rack and put all your heavy stuff in a sleeping bag stuff sack and bungie that on the rack.

 

 

Thanks for your long response. I already know the rule not to climb to impress someone, it gets me in a whole lot more trouble then I expect... well atleast with you guys. Yes, I have been learning from my mistakes. I learned the snow pad the hard way, it's not luxury.

As for the water, a majority of the Mountain Loop Highway I biked without refills. At Columbia Peak I nearly ran out of water, exept a half full bottle which I had to use to melt snow, so I knew I was dehydrated. It was a frightening experience up there, literally dreaming someone was rescueing me, only to wake up shivering knowing that no one knew where I was. As for shedding layers, I was in shorts and no shirt going up, I had zip off snow pants. I did not drink from creeks although I was very tempted on the way up and down, especially on the way down due to low water supply.

 

As for 9 pounds being too much on Rainier, I drank it all before making it to Camp Muir. I drink more water than the average person, during a school day I would say I drink about a gallon a day if not more. I also over heat more than the average person, which is why I love snow~!

 

As fir going to Taco Bell, it was cheap, I had 5$ or so during the entire bike ride, and I had to make it last. I left a part of the story out when cramping up in the tent on Columbia Peak in the pouring down cold rain when the burritos were taking there toll if you know what I mean which made the moments even more torture.

 

As for checking the weather, I did, they said partly cloudy and perhaps a little worse, which I knew could mean storm up there, but I was so determined that the weather would not scare me away!

 

As for the advice about Stuart... Thanks! I'll have to keep that in mind when observing the upper part. Stuart would be crazy in bad weather which is why I plan on looking at the forcast ahead of time.

 

As for Rainier, well now that I have good odds next year, why not shoot for that. This year I was discouraged when I was out of the osat group so I did not train a whole lot, although I did do a few things. And I would go with experienced people.

 

As for the rack idea.... how much do they cost? I indeed had the pack on my back. I appreciate all your advice! Cheers Josh Lewis.

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fyi, regarding food.. if you want to go cheap, don't buy fast food. learn to make your own. for the road, wraps, couscous, fruit & nuts, etc. at home, rice, beans (soak dried ones), veggies.. way healthier too.

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I guess I could always settle for Aconcagua

 

haha maybe its just me but I thought Aconcagua was pretty challenging...

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haha maybe its just me but I thought Aconcagua was pretty challenging...

It is! And who says I won't be able to do it ever? By the way, I love challenges...

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fyi, regarding food.. if you want to go cheap, don't buy fast food. learn to make your own. for the road, wraps, couscous, fruit & nuts, etc. at home, rice, beans (soak dried ones), veggies.. way healthier too.

 

Definitely a good idea.

 

If you have to eat stuff on a budget, Taco Bell is the worst you can get. Even McDonalds is better (but I wouldn't recommend it unless it's necessary!).

 

My suggestion is, buy some beans and rice, then melt some cheese over top of them, and sprinkle seasoning on it if you want. That's similar to Taco Bell food, except it is actually very healthy for you- it has a lot of protein and usable carbs that you can burn before a trip.

 

I always bring fruit bars- dried fruit is great for a snack. If you need some, the fruit bars I eat are like $0.25 each if you buy a box of them at Costco.

 

As for water, a good trip leader will give you a chance to stop and filter water if necessary. If anyone has a SteriPen UV filter (like the one I have), it only takes 90 seconds to filter a liter of water- just make sure someone has a Nalgene bottle so that the filter can fit. You can stop at a stream whenever you need to filter water. Filtering water at camp is also necessary.

 

Before a trip, make sure that you have fruit, protein (meat or cheese), and a couple of snacks. Don't go entirely on snacks- anything made by Little Debbie is bad for you. Only bring one or two crap things like that. Remember how I had my one Oreo-cake bar? That was it- everything else was at least reasonably healthy in my food bag. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are good food too.

 

I would suggest peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, rice and beans, cheese, dried fruit and nuts, cereal, oatmeal, and just a little bit of junk food.

 

-Mark

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Wow Thanks Mark, at first when I was reading that, I thought this guy's a nice guy with great advice, then I realized it was my friend... As for the little debbies... ok you caught me on that one. As for you saying McDonalds is cheaper... really? A half pound bean and rice borrito was about 1.29$.... at McDonalds you can get better deals? Hmmmm if so, let me in on the deal.

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Fer cryin' out loud... quit sprayin and go climb something...

Solo? I'm out of partners, not exactly the greatest idea... but I could go scrambling.

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Fuck no, man!!!1 We just hit 10 pages. Now, at last, we can talk about global warming!!!1

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As for you saying McDonalds is cheaper... really? A half pound bean and rice borrito was about 1.29$.... at McDonalds you can get better deals? Hmmmm if so, let me in on the deal.

 

I didn't say McDonalds was cheaper, I said it wasn't AS BAD as Taco Bell. Still bad, though! Don't eat any of that crap if you can avoid it.

 

-Mark

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Ok. So you said beans and rice... and some kind of fruit bar, now all I need is Homer Simpson's fruit bar maker... :laf:

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Hey peepul, we're only SEVEN posts away from getting off this page (page 10).

Can we PLEEEEEEEEEEZE start talking about global warming now???

 

Where's that beyotch minx when you need her, eh? :rolleyes:

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Global warming is melting all the snow this year. Get up there quick to be the last one to see it.

I flew over Stu on Tuesday the 21st.

I marked the route.

Yellow is hiking.

Orange is where you have to pay attention to route finding.

Stu1.jpg

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Hey peepul, we're only SEVEN posts away from getting off this page (page 10).

Can we PLEEEEEEEEEEZE start talking about global warming now???

 

Where's that beyotch minx when you need her, eh? :rolleyes:

 

I had some Taco Bell stuff and I think by reaction to it may contribute to climate change.

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I gets the feeling that this "kid" everyone is trying to advise does a lot of fishing and dates a girl named "Amber".

 

800px-Trolling_drawing.jpg

 

b5ba3e15-5d3a-48ed-b2c9-9c0400e0227d.jpg

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