Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Jelf

fledgling trad rack

Recommended Posts

Also, just keep an eye out for sales. Full sets of nuts go on sale all the time and so do the sets of Metolius TCU's. Just stick with some standard sizes and work to odd things like tiny cams and huge cams only when you have routes that require them.

 

Can't go wrong with .75, 1, 2 and 3 Black Diamond cams if you do decide to throw down for some.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
push in, pull out... just like Mr Jimmi

 

hmmm i dont' have a Jimmi so that explains why i don't get it. acter some discusion it seems like the issue is not so much that i can't get the tri cam out as it is that my ropegun places shit too high for me to reach from the good stance. nuts and cams i can generaly coax out of the crack with one hand... not so much the tri cam. live and learn and keep trying :moondance:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just be sure to bring the #11 hex. It's good for throwing at goats, inattentive belayers, and ropegun's who place pro to high :eveeel:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm i dont' have a Jimmi so that explains why i don't get it

 

you should learn to be more hands on...works great for you and your partner.

 

i can generaly coax it out of the crack with one hand...

 

sounds like you are on your way, practice makes perfect!! have fun!

 

I scooped this page from another web site

 

Sink the pink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have placed a pink tricam on almost every pitch I have lead. My red tricam only gets used half as much.

Different technologies do differnt things. Tricams are bomber in horizontal cracks, flared cracks and pockets where often times, nothing else would have any hope of sticking much less holding a fall.

If you haven't mastered them, you are doing too many long runouts or not enough hard climbing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For example, the Metolius nuts work way better in flared cracks.

 

How would any nut ever work in a flared crack? You still need some constriction.

Aha, I'm glad you asked. Cracks are three-dimensional creatures. You can have constriction in the x-axis and flare in the y-axis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know where you could borrow a jimmi for practice.

 

:moondance: luckily so do i

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the rule of Tricams is to be the one to place 'em.

 

Here is a rack I am sure you folks can empathize with, it is my "I Forgot the Rack Rack".

Forgot_the_Rack_Rack.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tri Cams rule. They are a really good thing to have doing alpine routes since they don't weigh you down like the same set of cams.

 

will someone pretty please teach me how to remove a tricam???

 

thank you :moondance:

 

The pinks and reds are notorious for getting stuck, but there are couple of ways of working them out.

 

1. First I try getting behind and under the rocker on the tricam with a nut tool and twist to lift the rocker, forcing the spike down. Once loose try hooking around the spike and pull out out the tri-cam.

2. You can also try getting in front and on top of the rocker with your nut tool and twist to force the rocker down. Pull the tri-cam out while holding down the rocker with your nut tool.

3. For over cammed tri-cams bang the hell out of the bottom of the rocker.

4. For squeezed in tri-cams try 1. and 2., cuss like a mofo, scrape your knuckles, cuss even more, then yell up to your partner to get it on rappel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretend your fingers are chopsticks and the tricam is sushi and just lift it out of there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

easy start... set o' nuts...mid-range hexes. Learn how to place those, and add cams as you need them for routes. That way you learn to place passive pieces (easier to evaluate placement)at a level well below your sport-climbing limit ergo decreasing your chances of falling on a crappy placement. Add time and money and you're climbing hard stuff on a complete rack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember to carry your open mind in addition to a full rack. Many, many times upon many times have I used slings, webbing, and prusik cords to sling and improvise protection. In semi and off-width you may find or can carry and start placing chalk stones (rocks) in wedged in the crack. Sling 'em, stand on 'em. Watch Crouching Tiger and see what you get from the scene wher Li Mu Bai bests the girl with a stick vs the sword Green Destiny and translate that to climbing. Use the obvious, but many times we do not leave that opening as apparant.

 

Talking to some old timers they used to carry stones and large machined nuts to place in cracks and thus slung them.

 

Stay alert and open to or create the obvious. Sometimes technology doesn't replace old school nor technique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to remember is that around here there aren't many true splitters, so with a little practice it's easier to place and faster to evaluate a good nut than it is a good cam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×