Jump to content

3 Lost on Mount Hood


cluck

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 1.3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

a few years back i climbed up mt cuerno (17000ft) in winter alone up and down 80% ice,with no ropes, in a developping snowstorm, with 1l water and a bar.what i brought was 2;40 marathon fitness, acclimatisation to 22000ft, sharp tools and some faith. what we bring is always relative. another time i was climbing mt washington (6000ft) with 50 lbs of gear and got blown off, spent 5 days out until choppa came......i had to pray , but it came... gear,prep,etc is no garantee .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a few years back i climbed up mt cuerno (17000ft) in winter alone up and down 80% ice,with no ropes, in a developping snowstorm, with 1l water and a bar.what i brought was 2;40 marathon fitness, acclimatisation to 22000ft, sharp tools and some faith. what we bring is always relative. another time i was climbing mt washington (6000ft) with 50 lbs of gear and got blown off, spent 5 days out until choppa came......i had to pray , but it came... gear,prep,etc is no garantee .

 

Thanks for sharing. You are a hero.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If not a climber, it's difficult to understand how much gear is essential to get up a technical route on a big mtn. Besides clothes, food, fuel, bivi sac and sleeping bag, you really shouldn't forget:

Harness

Helmet

Ice screws (6-8 total)

Pickets (3-4)

Ropes (usually 2, 60 meter 9 mil)

Slings to set up belays, anchors

Carabiners (many)

2 technical ice tools each

Crampons

 

There's more I'm probably forgetting at this late hour. My point is that this isn't a hike!! It would be impossible to lead a pitch of 60 degree ice with 2 weeks of "extra" food and fuel. To suggest such is just plain ignorant of what Kelly, Brian, and Nikko were attempting to accomplish.

 

We are surly now, I'm beginning to feel like our lifestyle is being questioned or put on trial by a gaggle of "expert" naysayers. I stand by our buddy's gear list, have no reason to believe that I'd have done or taken anything other than what they did on this trip. This is how these mtn's are climbed, period. Generation's of climbers world wide have perfected these techniques. On every piece of gear we buy there is a disclaimer that starts with, "Climbing is dangerous............"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...Besides clothes, food, fuel, bivi sac and sleeping bag, you really shouldn't forget:

...

 

That depends on many factors such as how many parties in a team, how skilled and experienced, which mountain, which route, what kind conditions, to name a few.

 

But yes the right keyword is "no guarantee."

 

Edited by mrd
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lambone, Shini, and Layton: we have been trying for the last few days to keep this thread relatively free of the tit-fot-tat and similar distractions. One climber was found dead today. We are all saddened by this turn of events. Please, if you feel the need to debate somebody about MRE's or something, go to another thread.

 

Matt,

Because of the recent press that informed the general public of our existence, cc.com has been invaded by a horde of people who don't climb, or who don't climb in the Cascades. They have perverted our forums to a degree even we ourselves have never reached. Worse yet, they clutter up our threads and waste our time reading though their ignorant and blatantly un-educated posts to learn anything of material value to the subject.

In MontanaPup's words, "tell Matt they've hijacked entire website." Layton's analogy of gawkers at an accident may describe it best.

 

Please lock this thread. Force the new arrivals to disperse. Better yet, please PM them and give them some ground rules - like where the bloody hell Newbies and Sprayers should post their thoughts. But lock this thread - its value has been lost in this worthless clutter. To which I'm going to start adding to in volume.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Going to bed.

 

I'm a Troll? I searched, and this means I am an uneducated lurker.

 

I grew up in a spot so remote, we had a Scout Camp on my Farm.

 

I would go out with what I could carry for a month at a time over summer breaks. We'd have to look for squirrels and rabbits to eat (Hard to find in the wild, but not in the suburbs).

 

I've even made Turtle soup many times, and eaten Brain sandwhiches more than I'd want to admit. GroundHog and Raccoon are the worst, too much fat and Grease. I called it at Possum, I won't eat that stupid ass tree climber.

 

I do live to eat acorns, but you have to leach(soak) them in water for a wek first, as they have tanic acid that will shut down your digestive system.

 

I LOVED going out in snow waist deep, and building a snow cave to sleep in. We used to build a fire, get the snow to start to melt, then put it out to freeze into an ice dome on the first night.

 

I did this all the time from grade school, thru high school, and kept doing this thru college. Started doing again as a father of 2 boy scouts now living in the subburbs.

 

So F!ck you if you think I'm a poser. I've made more than my fair share of traps, and gutted and skinned and preserved plenty of pelts. Pour that salt down the RacoonTail.

 

I also used to turn in the Groundhogs ears for 50 cents. I bought another box of 50 .22 shells with that 50 cents for the bounty every week.

 

If I hadn't met and married my wife, and had my 2 boys, I'd hang all the time above the treeline.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you a mountain climber or a hillbilly out in the sticks? How many rabbits and turtles lurking around glaciers at 11K? I know nothing about this sport other than what I've learned in the past week, which ain't much but for some stuff about snow caves. Didn't even know what a snow cave was before Wednesday, and yet I see nothing that banter has in common with what these three men were doing. Now excuse me while I go look for a mountain climbing website that discusses the importance of having a BB gun at the top of Mt. Hood. In the mean time, tell Dolly I said hi.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Going to bed.

 

I'm a Troll? I searched, and this means I am an uneducated lurker.

 

I grew up in a spot so remote, we had a Scout Camp on my Farm.

 

I would go out with what I could carry for a month at a time over summer breaks. We'd have to look for squirrels and rabbits to eat (Hard to find in the wild, but not in the suburbs).

 

I've even made Turtle soup many times, and eaten Brain sandwhiches more than I'd want to admit. GroundHog and Raccoon are the worst, too much fat and Grease. I called it at Possum, I won't eat that stupid ass tree climber.

 

I do live to eat acorns, but you have to leach(soak) them in water for a wek first, as they have tanic acid that will shut down your digestive system.

 

I LOVED going out in snow waist deep, and building a snow cave to sleep in. We used to build a fire, get the snow to start to melt, then put it out to freeze into an ice dome on the first night.

 

I did this all the time from grade school, thru high school, and kept doing this thru college. Started doing again as a father of 2 boy scouts now living in the subburbs.

 

So F!ck you if you think I'm a poser. I've made more than my fair share of traps, and gutted and skinned and preserved plenty of pelts. Pour that salt down the RacoonTail.

 

I also used to turn in the Groundhogs ears for 50 cents. I bought another box of 50 .22 shells with that 50 cents for the bounty every week.

 

If I hadn't met and married my wife, and had my 2 boys, I'd hang all the time above the treeline.

 

OMG - this is one of the most unintentionally hilarious posts I have ever read. Thank you ShiniGami for the humor in light of such a bad situation. You're like Borat for CascadeClimbers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Going to bed.

 

I'm a Troll? I searched, and this means I am an uneducated lurker.

 

I grew up in a spot so remote, we had a Scout Camp on my Farm.

 

I would go out with what I could carry for a month at a time over summer breaks. We'd have to look for squirrels and rabbits to eat (Hard to find in the wild, but not in the suburbs).

 

I've even made Turtle soup many times, and eaten Brain sandwhiches more than I'd want to admit. GroundHog and Raccoon are the worst, too much fat and Grease. I called it at Possum, I won't eat that stupid ass tree climber.

 

I do live to eat acorns, but you have to leach(soak) them in water for a wek first, as they have tanic acid that will shut down your digestive system.

 

I LOVED going out in snow waist deep, and building a snow cave to sleep in. We used to build a fire, get the snow to start to melt, then put it out to freeze into an ice dome on the first night.

 

I did this all the time from grade school, thru high school, and kept doing this thru college. Started doing again as a father of 2 boy scouts now living in the subburbs.

 

So F!ck you if you think I'm a poser. I've made more than my fair share of traps, and gutted and skinned and preserved plenty of pelts. Pour that salt down the RacoonTail.

 

I also used to turn in the Groundhogs ears for 50 cents. I bought another box of 50 .22 shells with that 50 cents for the bounty every week.

 

If I hadn't met and married my wife, and had my 2 boys, I'd hang all the time above the treeline.

 

Please go away.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you a mountain climber or a hillbilly out in the sticks? How many rabbits and turtles lurking around glaciers at 11K? I know nothing about this sport other than what I've learned in the past week, which ain't much but for some stuff about snow caves. Didn't even know what a snow cave was before Wednesday, and yet I see nothing that banter has in common with what these three men were doing. Now excuse me while I go look for a mountain climbing website that discusses the importance of having a BB gun at the top of Mt. Hood. In the mean time, tell Dolly I said hi.

 

you can stay i like you :moondance: i will even teach you to crag if you like. i haven't laughed so hard all week :lmao:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...Besides clothes, food, fuel, bivi sac and sleeping bag, you really shouldn't forget:

...

 

That depends on many factors such as how many parties in a team, how skilled and experienced, which mountain, which route, what kind conditions, to name a few.

 

But yes the right keyword is "no guarantee."

 

Please go away.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lambone, Shini, and Layton: we have been trying for the last few days to keep this thread relatively free of the tit-fot-tat and similar distractions. One climber was found dead today. We are all saddened by this turn of events. Please, if you feel the need to debate somebody about MRE's or something, go to another thread.

 

Matt,

Because of the recent press that informed the general public of our existence, cc.com has been invaded by a horde of people who don't climb, or who don't climb in the Cascades. They have perverted our forums to a degree even we ourselves have never reached. Worse yet, they clutter up our threads and waste our time reading though their ignorant and blatantly un-educated posts to learn anything of material value to the subject.

In MontanaPup's words, "tell Matt they've hijacked entire website." Layton's analogy of gawkers at an accident may describe it best.

 

Please lock this thread. Force the new arrivals to disperse. Better yet, please PM them and give them some ground rules - like where the bloody hell Newbies and Sprayers should post their thoughts. But lock this thread - its value has been lost in this worthless clutter. To which I'm going to start adding to in volume.

 

I agree

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If there is any need for a trained Critical Incident Counselor to provide support to the rescue teams or family please drop me a line off list.

 

I don't know about that, but there is now clearly a need for one here. This has been a quite unbelievable discourse almost to the point where the first thing that needs to happen at the onset of any future incident is to immediately lock down forum membership to a moderated sign-up mode. Separate sign-up links for family, incident team members, the media, and general public could be established and requests quickly reviewed. A moderated primary incident thread could also be established as well a read-only thread Incident Team notices could be post to. That would be a hellish burden on the CC.com moderators, but it would seem something is needed to control the clueless spray and circus of sudden interest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nope, Mike is definitely not all bad. He's a heck of a good climber and we like him around here. Lambone is OK, too. What I saw was a thread that we have been trying to maintain as an information-sharing discussion (with some disctractions here and there) rapidly accelerating toward off-topic banter and quip. I cut out a handful of posts and suggested that elsewhere on the board we maintain opportunities for any and just about all of the comments somebody would want to post.

 

But here we've been talking about the incident, the search and rescue effot, reporting news, and speculating about events. If you want to argue about the ten essentials or call each other idiots there are indeed other discussions on this very website for that purpose.

 

A special place where I can call idiocy - really?!?!?!?!?!?!? I'm there! Bye for now.

 

Please go away.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes Matt and Michael, I agree, it feels to me like this thread has been taken over by non-climbers, and maybe that is okay. It has been a good source of information. Unfortunately, it looks like this thread is a goner and has degraded to the point of being an injustice to the original intent of tracking the status of three climbers lost on Mount Hood.

 

For non-climbers - As far as fast and light goes, non-climbers just don't get it! This is not a put down. Even climbers don't generally get it at first, until they've suffered enough to. There is a saying that is often applied to mountaineering/alpine climbing and it is "weight is the enemy". This is, with respect to technical climbing, universally true. Again, if you are not a climber, you won't get it and you never will unless you become one and this fact frustrates many of us who are climbers. This doesn't mean going unprepared, but it means going with the minimum of what you can reasonably expect to need. What that minimum is is a team / individual decision. It is part of the nature of the mountaineering experience and it is one of the many judgment calls that must be made. I always consider the possibility of an injury, but pray that it doesn't occur – even in good conditions an injury in mountainous terrain is a serious matter.

 

Matt, this is an attempt to appease non-climbers, but will probably just add fuel to the fire. If you feel it doesn't belong feel free to delete it.

 

This thread has degraded badly. I'm sorry for those that have come here for useful information and status.

 

And I am sorry for the families and friends affected by this tragedy, my thoughts and prayers are with you. Thank you again to all those involved in the rescue effort – stay safe.

Edited by gary_hehn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.



×
×
  • Create New...