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JayB

Online (The Climb) Question

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I've seen this climb rated at III 5.10b R, and although I'm cool with the III, the 5.10, and the R (up to 5.8R, that is), I've got a way to go before I'm cool with a 5.10b R pitch. So the question is - is the R rated stuff on the easier pitches - pretty typical for slabby stuff - or does the R-stuff happen on the business pitch? Thanks in advance for any info.

 

[ 07-09-2002, 08:01 PM: Message edited by: JayB ]

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Relax primo! it's all good when you want it to be good. Now offline, that was a WHOLE different deal alltogether. Translate = onlime safe for 5.8 runout leader. Offline = safe for 5.9 runout leader. My own PEARSONAL views and interpolations.

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In my opinion (and I've only climbed On Line three times; others have done it many, many more times), the .10b thing is overstating it. Maybe .10a or .9+. Just follow the instructions in Nelson/Potterfield Vol. II for the crux (i.e. start traversing up and left above the little lip after the second bolt -- don't go straight for the third bolt unless you want to make it harder on yourself). As for the "R" rating, it's BS. You won't find bolts every 15 ft., but most likely you won't freak either. You should take cams to 1" for the occassional overlap. As for the grade III, I think that is overstating things too. If your beta is from Smoot, know that he may never have climbed the route. I think The Kone is overall harder.

 

Have fun!

 

John Sharp

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Speaking on the smoot guides-

 

I think he is more of a rock climber from rumors. I have traded emails and stuff with him. Seems like a nice guy no doubt. But how are you an author of books pertaining to a bunch of climbs you have never done [Confused] The information may be ok or may be dubious. I guess working for the lawyer group that you might know how to dodge plagiarism well. [laf] That said bring on the controversey. I used to like sharing the information with him until I realized that he is not a subject matter expert in mountains or on many rock climbs from doing them. Sure secnd hand info is ok........

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My info is only second hand, but I have heard much of his is the same. I do like the topos that he used in his Static Point section, though. Wouldn't use his books for Darrington anymore.

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He is now authoring alpine books. I saw one today. I would be that some of the contributors would be better authors mvs, alex, danielpatricksmith, philfort, dberdinka, and others... Nothing to get bent out of shape for on my end. All knowledgable people. However why rely on someone that does not have real experience there is my thoughts.

 

Experience out there counts in more ways than one.

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quote:

Originally posted by Cpt.Caveman:

Why not send your info to Fred Beckey
[Confused]

Hear hear! I was climbing at Darrington last weekend, using mattp's excellent topos, and was reflecting on the inferior info in the Smoot book I borrowed from someone at the base. It seems to me that the all-in-one guide for this state can't really be done by one person, its just too much stuff. You might be able to pull it off it someone was the editor and had different authors for different crags, because a great guide requires both intimate knowledge and a genuine passion for the area. This led me to thinking that Mr. Perkins needs to finish a set of topos for all of Darrington. What do you say Matt, need a little project for all your spare time? Anyway, the way this all connects to Caveman's last post, was that I wound up reflecting on who will take Fred's place? [Eek!] Now, I don't know Jeff Smoot, and I'm not slamming the man, but I think he would like to be it, and I'm just not sure he has the resume for the job. Nelson and Potterfield have churned out a nice couple volumes, but those books in no way replace the encyclopedic splendor of the three volume bible, and in fact I think they've done for a fistful of climbs what Fifty Crowded Climbs did for the likes of Liberty Ridge and West Ridge of Forbidden. I don't have an answer, just a mild free floating anxiety...

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I think Ray Borbon shoul d write a guide to selected routes of Da Toof. Sure to be a Mountaineers Best Seller.

 

The nice thing about that Kearney selected guide is that he's done every climb in it. Oh yeah and the description of Burdo "hanging on an overhanging finger crack with one hand and scrubbing lichen from it with the other" [big Grin] while leading in the Wine Spires.

 

Why aren't there Beer Spires? [big Drink][big Drink]

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Regarding Jeff's alpine guide, he climbed the Monte Cristo area peaks, the Gunn/Merchant/Baring set, the peaks around Mt. Rainier, Sahale, Hidden Lakes, Big Chiwaukum [sp], Cashmere. Those are the ones I know off the top of my head. I think it's a good book (but I did contribute to it so I'm biased). There are certainly mistakes somewhere, but I got the impression he paid great attention to detail. Jeff also has a website where corrections are posted(climbingwashington.com).

--Michael

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JAYB,

 

the runouts on online are mellow. the 'hard' part of the route is protected.

 

truthfully i didnt even know it had a runout rating. though like everyone said i think the route grade is a little inflated.

 

still a great route and well worth doing. nothing like multi-pitch sport climbing. [Razz]

 

[big Drink]

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I don't disagree with the posts above (it is probably not 5.10b, not "R" and not grade III), but if you are worried by the prospect of leading "runout slab" I believe you will find On Line to be "thought-provoking." While there, check out some of the other routes: like Shock Treatment (harder) and Fuddhatt/Kill da Wabbit (more varied climbing). On a hot day, expect to get completely baked.

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quote:

Originally posted by mvs:

Regarding Jeff's alpine guide, he climbed the Monte Cristo area peaks, the Gunn/Merchant/Baring set, the peaks around Mt. Rainier, Sahale, Hidden Lakes, Big Chiwaukum [sp], Cashmere. Those are the ones I know off the top of my head. I think it's a good book (but I did contribute to it so I'm biased). There are certainly mistakes somewhere, but I got the impression he paid great attention to detail. Jeff also has a website where corrections are posted(climbingwashington.com).

--Michael

Yeah I am pretty sure his alpine experience is limited and there is no way I will ever contribute to a plagiaristic guy that does not really climb. That said I would like to see him climb some real routes and write about them [Roll Eyes]

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Matt has it right. And for the record, when I was there with Erik and his pal last year, we got completely baked about five times. And it wasn't even that hot.

 

=;-)

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Please send all info on how to climb in the Picket Range. I have never been to any of them and want to make money by writing a book [Roll Eyes][Moon]

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What MattP said.

 

But I'll add more words [big Grin] .

 

"thought provoking": There is plenty of time on the route where the leader will be 15-30 feet from his/her last pro. Most of that time he/she will not have any holds that will save him/her should his/her feet slip. At what I think is the crux he/she will be clipping a bolt probably 20 feet from the last one. Hint: that may not be the crux spot for the second. I have led Online 3 or 4 times and have never fallen, but have had thoughts provoked every time.

 

Grade III??? I must insert a [laf] . Perhaps if you factor in the approach. BUT, if you don't have any route-finding or traffic problems and leave Seattle after a nice breakfast, you can be home for dinner (and climb BOTH Online and Offline). The only way Online is gonna take you more than 3 hours or so is if you get Big Ledge Syndrome and do a lot of "wingeing" (tm Glen) due to all the thoughts provoked.

 

It could happen [Cool] .

 

Oh yeah, and Smoot's book are good in general, but often have problems with details. Don't use the Smoot directions for getting to Static Point. I think it says something like "walk up a dry streambed" doesn't it? Hint: you don't walk up ANY streambeds to get to Static Point.

 

Finally, bring a big chainsaw and cut out the big log on the approach road for us.

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quote:

Originally posted by Cpt.Caveman:

Yeah I am pretty sure his alpine experience is limited and there is no way I will ever contribute to a plagiaristic guy that does not really climb. That said I would like to see him climb some real routes and write about them
[Roll Eyes]

I don't think he'll care if you withhold your information, Cavey. [Roll Eyes]

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quote:

Originally posted by mvs:

quote:

Originally posted by Cpt.Caveman:

Yeah I am pretty sure his alpine experience is limited and there is no way I will ever contribute to a plagiaristic guy that does not really climb. That said I would like to see him climb some real routes and write about them
[Roll Eyes]

I don't think he'll care if you withhold your information, Cavey.
[Roll Eyes]
Yeah I did not think so either.

 

However I cant justify buying a book off someone that has no real knowledge. Ask him if he's ever climbed NR stuart or Rainier more than once? I bet not. Oh yeah mike I dont like you. You're a weenie. Hope to give you a friendly alpine greeting next time we meet. [Moon] bitch

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quote:

Originally posted by chucK:

Finally, bring a big chainsaw and cut out the big log on the approach road for us.

What's the legality here? Since I live right down the road, I have been thinking about taking that log out after work one day. I don't know if special rules apply due to the watershed thing, or what. Anyone know? With a little work, that road could be passable again.

 

Greg

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So has Beckey climbed every route on every peak in the Cascades? [big Grin]

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quote:

Originally posted by Dru:

So has Beckey climbed every route on every peak in the Cascades?
[big Grin]

Anyone can copy topos from someone else's book. [Roll Eyes] Then claim to be an expert.

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Cavey,

I could tell stories about trying to provide information for him and I share some of your misgivings about Jeff's attention to detail, his methods and what I imagine to be his motivations -- but one thing I think you should recognize is that there is probably nobody who could assemble an accurate guide to all rock climbing areas in the state, Cascade scrambles, peak-bagger routes, and volcano's from California to Canada. As a guidebook author, Jeff's biggest problem is probably that he tries to do too much and that Falcon Books seems to encourage him to do so.

Matt

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quote:

Originally posted by Cpt.Caveman:

quote:

Originally posted by Dru:

So has Beckey climbed every route on every peak in the Cascades?
[big Grin]

Anyone can copy topos from someone else's book.
[Roll Eyes]
Then claim to be an expert.

Here is the beta for Chestbeater Direct on Horsecock Spire.

 

Begin at unclimbable overhang. Turn it on left via mixed free and aid moves into an open book then climb up obvious gully to a small shrub. Belay then launch into a series of tenouous but well protected mantleshelves to a double monodoight undercling. Move left, slinging horsecocks with spare slings, to a roche moutonee, and climb slabs andcracks up short walls to a great gash. Worm into gash and belly crawl downwards until a belay can be arranged with difficult protection. The next lead is best avoided. Four similar pitches on looser rock complete this classic excursion. Best done after sbnow melts but before bug season. Take a large rack and kletterschue.

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Mattp,

 

I like your political correctness it is entertaining. Anyway I dont think anyone is capable either. However to notify the public about my feelings which others share I feel obligated to expose some things.

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