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SemoreJugs

Respect for others on Rainier

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Absolutely true, I have been given dirty looks on the seldom occasion that I may pass someone. Slow? move over and deal with it.Don't be pissed at others for your lack of conditioning

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Maybe you are hard of reading? We moved out of the way for ANYONE faster. But just because you are faster does not give you the right to be disrespectful. Has it occured to you that maybe you climb too fast for the route you are on. You know there will be slow people, so why not go elsewhere? Or blaze your own boottrack up the mountain.

Or start earlier so you dont have to pass anyone. Thats what I would and will do from now on when I feel like the crowds are dangerous.

 

It sounds like you need more of a challenge anyway. But maybe you enjoy feeling superior to the "slow JONGs". How's that working out for you? Do you feel good about yourself by denegrating others? Joking about being a silly greenhorn is one thing, but saying fuck-off is quite another. Not even Alex Lowe was born with an ice ax in his hand.

I guess you never get passed. Whos your sponsor?

Maybe you go to Rainier to feel good about yourself by comparing yourselves to newbies because you cant keep up with people at your experience level? I think you are really weak and afraid inside. You might not even know it yet, but one day you will realize this, and that will be one hell of a reckoning. It happened to me.

 

Good Luck to you.

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always happy to let you pass. Just please be safe about it. We didnt knock rocks and ice down on you from above. So dont do it to us if you get above.

 

Thanks

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This thread is cracking me up! yelrotflmao.gif

 

I do get sick of the "I'm faster/better than you so get the fuck out of my way" attitude though. When passing or being passed on route, both parties share the responsibility for figuring out how to do it safely. If you zip past another party without even saying hello then you're being a jerk. On the other hand, if you ask to pass and the other party refuses or gets all bent out of shape, then they're being jerks.

 

In my experience, 99% of the time I've asked to pass a slower team, they've allowed us to slip by and there are no hard feelings.

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I was up on the emmons this weekend, and despite the crowds I had a good time and everyone I came across was quite friendly.

 

On the walk from Schurman to the Flats my buddy and I were the first to come across a fellow in the middle of trying to pull his ropemate from a hole about twenty feet down. He was kinda busy holding his buddy's weight, so we dropped our gear and got an anchor set up, I yarded his pack out while he started prussiking. A few minutes later another team walks by...first guy assumes we're practicing, but the second guy asks if this is 'for real', I ask if they wouldn't mind sticking around and they were happy to do so. We all got on the rope and yarded the climber out of the hole and all three of our teams camped near one another that night.

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I was up on the emmons this weekend, and despite the crowds I had a good time and everyone I came across was quite friendly.

 

On the walk from Schurman to the Flats my buddy and I were the first to come across a fellow in the middle of trying to pull his ropemate from a hole about twenty feet down. He was kinda busy holding his buddy's weight, so we dropped our gear and got an anchor set up, I yarded his pack out while he started prussiking. A few minutes later another team walks by...first guy assumes we're practicing, but the second guy asks if this is 'for real', I ask if they wouldn't mind sticking around and they were happy to do so. We all got on the rope and yarded the climber out of the hole and all three of our teams camped near one another that night.

 

Jesus H. Did you mates pat each other on the ass and sit around the head lamps and sing "Kumba Ya"? yellaf.gifcry.gif

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I was up on the emmons this weekend, and despite the crowds I had a good time and everyone I came across was quite friendly.

 

On the walk from Schurman to the Flats my buddy and I were the first to come across a fellow in the middle of trying to pull his ropemate from a hole about twenty feet down. He was kinda busy holding his buddy's weight, so we dropped our gear and got an anchor set up, I yarded his pack out while he started prussiking. A few minutes later another team walks by...first guy assumes we're practicing, but the second guy asks if this is 'for real', I ask if they wouldn't mind sticking around and they were happy to do so. We all got on the rope and yarded the climber out of the hole and all three of our teams camped near one another that night.

 

Jesus H. Did you mates pat each other on the ass and sit around the head lamps and sing "Kumba Ya"? yellaf.gifcry.gif

 

If you feel compelled to ridicule the kind of behavior exemplified by Pete_A et al above, you are pathetic. Not only that, but you are standing up for the worst tendencies among mountaineers, while he stands for the best. So there.

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What makes you think people are going to change when they get to the mt? People are assholes on the road, in airports, in the malls, at REI, at the ski resorts and on and on and on.

 

If you want to avoid the assholes stay home.

 

Aaron

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I was up on the emmons this weekend, and despite the crowds I had a good time and everyone I came across was quite friendly.

 

On the walk from Schurman to the Flats my buddy and I were the first to come across a fellow in the middle of trying to pull his ropemate from a hole about twenty feet down. He was kinda busy holding his buddy's weight, so we dropped our gear and got an anchor set up, I yarded his pack out while he started prussiking. A few minutes later another team walks by...first guy assumes we're practicing, but the second guy asks if this is 'for real', I ask if they wouldn't mind sticking around and they were happy to do so. We all got on the rope and yarded the climber out of the hole and all three of our teams camped near one another that night.

 

Hi Pete!

That was me in the hole, Snowball! Thanks for helping me out of that Blue Ice Cavern to Hell! Thanks to Drew as well as my strong partner Jerry. Thought i was going to die when i started falling straight down with the full acceleration of free fall.

 

Never fallen into a crevasse before. First time, but i never thought it was going to be like that. Glad to be roped-up even on that "benign" stretch between Camp Schurman and Emmons Flat where there is a million foot prints all over the place and where people casually walk unroped because its "safely wanded". hellno3d.gif

 

Many lessons learned that day. After setting up camp, i got my head back together and we topped out the mountain with y'all that night. Will post a full TR soon on the incident.

fruit.gif

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someone said 'leave earlier if you don't want to be held up'

 

well...I decided to do the DC earlier last week. The team I met up with at Muir was by my side. We all were up at 10:45 and left by 11:30. A team of 9 from Stanford, CA wanted to be the first on the trail so they left a few before us. I knew they would hold us up and would slow us down...sure enough they did. They were almost to Cathedral Gap by the time we left Muir and we caught up to them at Ingraham Flats. They didn't let us pass until the mid section of the Cleaver. They ended up turning around at that point and wasted an hour of our time.

 

If you're a slow party and you see that you are holding up a team behind you, step off the trail or give a motion to pass on the side. It isn't an ego thing.

 

We still summited in 5 hours, but if that team hadn't of slowed us down we could have made it in well under 4.5 hours.

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I couldnt agree more. I always yield out of courtesy and respect to faster parties. Please pass me if you are faster! I only ask that you pass safely and in respect (its a two way street).

 

Thats the whole point of my post. For 99.9% of all climbers, there is always gonna be someone more skilled, wiser, faster; and conversely, there will definitely be people with less experience, slower, dangerous because of their inexperince, etc.

 

So lets share the mountains when we encounter one another. It would be great to have a wilderness experience every time you go out, but thats hard to achieve if you want to climb "classic" routes. Lets try to reserve the attitudes for the spray board. Remember, the mountain and rock has been there much longer than we have been. We are fortunate and priveledged to climb there. I dont care if you are a friggin sherpa, death applies to all--its the great equalizer. We are insignicant compared to the mountains. Just think, if Rainier had consciousness, it would erupt in laughter with all the little "tiffs" that these ants climbing on it engage in. If she wanted, maybe she would decide to brew up a fierce storm up high where the faster, "more worthy" parties were just to make a point. All the slower parties live. Faster parties die. its all relative.

 

Granted, usually it is the newbies that blow it (its a sharp, deadly learning curve), but sometimes some of the greatest climbers have gone out in not-so glorious ways. Goran Kropp met his end on a "lowly" 5.10 trad climb at a crag one step away from an outdoor climbing gym. Alex Lowe died in an avalanche while doing a routine scouting for a bigger objective.

 

Death is always one step away and does not discrimate based on status: sponsorships, AMGA certifications, badassness, summit lists, Search and Rescue, ski patrolls, etc.

 

Death does however have a craving for over-inflated egos. Beware!

 

Just some perspective and sanity...

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yep, if you want the experience but don't want to fight the masses, climb in the off season. The objective is harder and there isn't a soul around to save your ass if you eff up

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Hey, Semore....I agree with you. We were coming down the mountain after a successful climb on Sunday. When we reached the "rok wall of doom" a group of climbers were stalled on that nasty rock. It took them a good deal of time to get off the rock. In the meantime other groups of climbers arrived. The only thing we could do was wait until those ahead cleared before we could go.

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