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Bandit

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About Bandit

  • Rank
    journeyman
  • Birthday 07/01/1957

Converted

  • Occupation
    Disco Dancer,Shucking Oysters,Hucking Meat
  • Location
    Crystal Mountain, Washington
  1. Not a good start to the week

    6 9 1200 22 97 36 46 55 353 6 9 1300 19 95 31 45 57 353 6 9 1400 21 97 29 42 57 353 6 9 1500 21 97 35 45 54 353 6 9 1600 20 97 28 47 61 353 6 9 1700 21 96 43 54 71 353 6 9 1800 17 96 32 49 62 353 6 9 1900 14 95 24 45 65 353 6 9 2000 8 91 24 42 61 353 6 9 2100 6 91 11 37 55 353 6 9 2200 8 92 22 44 57 353 6 9 2300 9 93 34 48 59 353 6 10 0 10 93 39 49 59 353 6 10 100 10 93 36 51 61 353 6 10 200 12 94 27 45 59 353 6 10 300 12 94 7 29 45 353 6 10 400 14 95 4 11 24 353 --------------------------------------------------------Here are the weather facts up at Muir for the times of the hike. High winds and cold temps were brutal.
  2. Yes, another easterner gonna climb Rainier

    Pick a weather window of high pressure. Many climbers have been stranded high on Rainier in late season storms. Don't be like the Mt. Hood climbers.
  3. Favorite ski tune shops?

    Greenwater Skis Louie and Jim. Best ski tuners ever.
  4. Respect for others on Rainier

    No, not a patroller. A lift op with patroller friends.
  5. Respect for others on Rainier

    Ya sure. Ok! LOL!!
  6. Respect for others on Rainier

    Jesus H. Did you mates pat each other on the ass and sit around the head lamps and sing "Kumba Ya"?
  7. Respect for others on Rainier

    Like I said in my post. Quit lolly gagging and get the hell out of the way. High side, low side, who cares. Move your turtle ass over. JONG's like you, put other people in danger. Stay in the indoor rock climbing gym and show off your plum smugglers to all the 16 yr girlies, girly man.
  8. Respect for others on Rainier

    You have it backwards. If you are the slow party, you need to be aware of slowing the party behind you. Move your turtle butts over and let the faster crew pass. Ever play golf? The polite thing to do is to let the faster golfers play through. If you are playing slow , the marshall will get on your ass to speed up. Maybe they should have ranger marshalls to whip the slow asses to go faster. Slow = rude, if you don't move over. Fast = in shape, traveling light, etc. Use common sense Jugs, and quit being a lolly gagger. You're too worried about posing with all your new ,, latest REI gear. Go light, and leave your FOH book on the shelf.
  9. Respect for others on Rainier

    Well said, mate. I would add, that if you don't like the crowds, then go climb on the west side, like The Tahoma Glacier. Think out side the box and you might enjoy yourself, instead of whining about others mishaps. Rock Guy is correct. Come to Rainier prepared. Do your apprenticeship on Adams and Hood, then come to Rainier.
  10. Lost: Gloves near Pebble Creek

    I have an extra pair of gloves you can use. Hopefully someone will return your Marmot's.
  11. Wanted: partners for Sun-Tues

    Check your pm's Pandora.
  12. Muir snowfield

    The map and compass are good as long as you have an altimeter watch to know your altitude. Without knowing your altitude it doesn't do much good to have the GPS or compass. You have to know the precise altitude to make the correct compass changes to stay on course. Better yet go on a sunny day. Stay on the boot path. Bring wands. If the weather turns sour. Turn around immediately, and follow the boot path down. It's happened to me in a foggy condition. You couldn't see one foot ahead of you. We just followed the boot path down.
  13. Camp Muir - first timer

    Good point. A precise direction change at the correct altitude will give you much comfort in knowing you are on route. Along with a compass or GPS, one should also have an altimeter watch. Usually, the route is wanded by the NPS, but if you get off the boot path, you need skills to get back on. It's very important to know your altitude. If all else fails. Hunker in. This is where appropriate clothing and shelter come into play. Or dig a good snow cave. I like a tent, because it's easier to stay dry. Don't have to dig much. Hunker in, fire up the stove and watch the storm pass. It can be an exciting time or it could mean death. The choice is yours. Come prepared, be prepared and possibly retreat if need be. Come back another time if all else fails.
  14. Muir snowfield

    The most recent report says hypothermia may be the cause of death. One guy found with shorts on and the other with cotton clothing. Like they say, "COTTON KILLS". Leave the cotton at home for those comfy nights in your pajamas. Only synthetics , poly, even your grandfathers old polyester socks are better than cotton. Once your cotton clothes get wet "FORGET ABOUT IT". Just say no to cotton.
  15. Muir snowfield

    It's tricky coming down from Camp Muir in a storm. Sometimes it's better to hunker in and wait for a clearing. Looks like they got trapped above a cliff band and tried to retreat. Probably got fatiged, disoriented, no food, etc. Bad scene. I've been up at Camp Muir on my B.D. on July 1st. Got there in 70* weather in shorts and t-shirt. 30 minutes later in starts to snow big , wet ,heavy snow flakes. I asked the RMI cook if I could slip into the shack to put my shells on. If I didn't have extra clothes, I would have been in a world of hurt. Mt. Rainier is unpredictable at any time of year . Come prepared. Be prepared to rretreat. You can always come back another day.
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